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Old Bport vise or chinese angle lock?

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  • Old Bport vise or chinese angle lock?

    I have an old bport vise and a chinese angle lock knock off. The bport is a little buggered up and the chinese is new. Which should I use, which one to sell?

  • #2
    I like the angle locks better. They don't lift.

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    • #3
      Grab a DTI and see which is better. Worn out and abused B'port vs decent Taiwanese is a very different question than pristine B'port vs poorly made Chicom.

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      • #4
        I've already indicated the angle lock. It's less than a thou off. I'll check the Bport tomorrow. Thanks!

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        • #5
          The better Chinese anglelock clones out of the box are usually about as accurate as a BP vise in good shape but it's Kurt based design is definitely superior and repeats better. A worn out PB vise is worn out, period.

          My experience with theimport lock down vises is they're accurate enough and they work well but the cast iron used in their construction is soft. It wears easily. If you're running lots of identical parts this may be a factor in your purchase decision.

          For the home guy, if you like old classy stuff, get a used Bridgeport vise and restore it to new condition, put it on the shelf, and treat it like a museum piece. Meanwhile use the import vise for every day. The beauty of these import vises (and the Kurt and the better clones) is an experienced man on a surface grinder can restore one to like new accuracy in a couple hours.
          Last edited by Forrest Addy; 03-22-2012, 02:53 AM.

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          • #6
            I have one of each. I prefer the bridgport simply because it doesn't have an exposed lead screw. The bed of the vise is solid all the way across, and I can use the bed as a surface to locate my parts on the Z axis. The anglok had a big groove in the middle, which forces me to clamp parts off center in a lot of cases, which isn't really too good for the vise. I took my bridgeport vise all apart and remachined all the surfaces, made the gibs nice and snug...it works well enough for what I do.

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            • #7
              I would probably go with the chinese one since you already have it. The thing I noticed on these vises is if you replace the screws that hold the fixed jaw on, (assuming yours is the same as mine) with decent cap screws it makes a huge difference. Put an indicator on the fixed jaw and see how much it moves when you tighten it, if you haven't done this before it may really surprise you.

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              • #8
                In the event that you have say 0.010" (yep - that much) moving jaw up-lift, put a thin strip of 0.010" shim under the job near the fixed jaw before you tighten the moving jaw.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Budz100
                  I would probably go with the chinese one since you already have it. The thing I noticed on these vises is if you replace the screws that hold the fixed jaw on, (assuming yours is the same as mine) with decent cap screws it makes a huge difference. Put an indicator on the fixed jaw and see how much it moves when you tighten it, if you haven't done this before it may really surprise you.
                  I'd check to see that both jaws were flat and vertical too.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by lbhsbz
                    I have one of each. I prefer the bridgport simply because it doesn't have an exposed lead screw. The bed of the vise is solid all the way across, and I can use the bed as a surface to locate my parts on the Z axis. The anglok had a big groove in the middle, which forces me to clamp parts off center in a lot of cases, which isn't really too good for the vise. .
                    This is the design that beats them all imo. I had some issues I had to grind away, but what a vise....and that's from someone whose other vise is a new Kurt

                    http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/showthread.php?t=53212

                    Doesn't help the OP much....my opinion is unless the china vise is waaaay off it'd go with it over the older style. That lifting and tapping down of work is just something you never want to go back to once you used one that doesn't work that way. The unusable centre section is a i agree a pita - can't set work on it (have to use a parallel), more of a pain to clean in that it collects swarf etc...buts its the lesser of two evils; they hold more securely and they don't lift.

                    why not try both and you decide?
                    Last edited by Mcgyver; 03-22-2012, 07:57 PM.
                    .

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Mcgyver
                      .....................................

                      That lifting and tapping down of work is just something you never want to go back to once you used one that doesn't work that way.

                      ..................................................
                      I've always used the "tap down" method as I use a phosphor bronze "dolly" (about 2" diam x 4") to do it as I can hear or feel whethet there is a "hollow" (sound) or "hard" (down). Then I check to see if the parallels are tight or not.

                      I only tighten my vises with the heel of my hand ("dead hammer").

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                      • #12
                        remachining a grizzly vice; http://www.docsmachine.com/projects/4vise/4vise-01.html

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                        • #13
                          that's a good reminder! Mine supposedly was from Taiwan and doesn't show the extreme problems Docs does....if its one of those china vises, its not even fair to sell it, door stop maybe? . I don't think they are all that bad - the Glacern is from there and guys seem to like them.
                          .

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                          • #14
                            Wow! Elninio's website amkes you think twice about import vises. I'm thinking that some sellers of imports monitor the quality of what they sell. Anyone want to report on an import that looks decent on close examination?

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