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  • ot: tunnel digging as a hobby

    Anyone?

    It is from "Tunnel-Digging as a Hobby (Aug, 1932)" By Modern Mechanics. The other pages are about various strange homes (one is a hanging home, etc ...)
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harrison_Gray_Dyar,_Jr.

    According to Pamela M. Henson, they got Dyar in a bit of trouble: During the 1920s Dyar's most peculiar hobby came to light. When a truck fell into a labyrinth of tunnels near Dyar's old home in 1924, newspaper speculation attributed these to World War I spy nests, Civil War trysts, and mad scientists. Eventually Dyar accepted responsibility for the tunnels and similar works behind his new home, saying he found relaxation in digging underground. The brick-walled tunnels extended for hundreds of feet and measured six by six feet.


    More photos (just three) here http://thelocation.wordpress.com/201...rue-d-c-story/
    Last edited by Elninio; 03-22-2012, 09:49 PM.

  • #2
    Im curious. Is there any more to the article?

    rock~
    Civil engineers build targets, Mechanical engineers build weapons.

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    • #3
      Yeah, I can see where this is headed. First we have a couple of adventurous members here that construct their own tunnel network and then they will be back wanting advice about how to get their Bridgeport mill down to the lowest level.
      Cheers,
      Gary

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      • #4
        well its a novel solution to the lack of space we all suffer from
        .

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        • #5
          Getting it down is the easy part. It's getting it back out when you move...

          There's gotta be a better method than a shovel and bucket brigade to get the dirt out. Are there small tunneling machines you could build and then use an elevator to remove the spoils?

          Also, how big of a hole can you make before fear of collapse?

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          • #6
            Getting it down there will be easy. It will be the post on how to get grandpa's mill out after paving over the yard entrance 10 yrs later that will be entertaining.


            Jim types faster

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            • #7
              Now that you updated the information, I can see that getting the Bridgeport down will certainly not be a problem. As the truck driver found out, just get near the tunnel and everything just goes down, down, down.
              Cheers,
              Gary

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              • #8
                Originally posted by gcude
                Yeah, I can see where this is headed. First we have a couple of adventurous members here that construct their own tunnel network and then they will be back wanting advice about how to get their Bridgeport mill down to the lowest level.
                I remember a while ago there was a guy on cnczone who had the head of his VMC rise up into a closet , because it was so tall.

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                • #9
                  I believe that this is a hobby that's very popular with the Mexican drug guys. Most tunnels run in a north - south direction... mostely north

                  Joe B

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Mcgyver
                    well its a novel solution to the lack of space we all suffer from
                    Yeah, I can see that, but somehow going vertically from the mill to the lathe and then the workbench sounds like a lot more work. And what happens when you drop a screw? Now you gotta go down three floors to look for it!

                    I think I still prefer a horizontal layout.
                    .
                    "People will occasionally stumble over the truth, but most of the time they will pick themselves up and carry on" : Winston Churchill

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                    • #11
                      I suppose if you lived in the right kind of place... having to blast rock apart to get anywhere might attract a bit of attention. Still, it's amazing what a single person can do given enough time and dedication.

                      However, one look at the above picture shows the basic problem. While even a bug doctor can dig a 6' wide tunnel, it takes some serious engineering to make usable space. Getting a room down there, something at least 16' wide or better and not with a forest of support poles, is going to take some special skills. With some decent planning, it might be possible to dig small working tunnels to build what will be the ceiling supports, then excavate the room underneath.

                      Mining engineers likely know a bunch of ways to do this with relative ease. I suspect, over the years, more than a few engineering types have done this, and not had trucks fall into their designs.
                      http://fixerdave.blogspot.com/

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Jim Shaper

                        There's gotta be a better method than a shovel and bucket brigade to get the dirt out. Are there small tunneling machines you could build and then use an elevator to remove the spoils?

                        Also, how big of a hole can you make before fear of collapse?

                        You really need to live in an area where the ground is suitable, such as Coobar Pedy in Australia where the ground is somewhat like stiff cheese...

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                        • #13
                          I think my late Grandfather had this tunneling bug!!
                          When he retired, him and Granny moved from their big house into a small, 2 bedroom house.
                          The new home had no basement. And being in Kansas (Tornado alley), Grandpa wouldn't stand for that!
                          So he rigged a conveyor belt to the bed of his truck, and began digging.
                          He dug-out a 2 room basement, 8 ft. deep, and lined the walls with concrete.
                          He was in his early 80's when he did it, and he did it all by himself, and all by hand.
                          I was impressed.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by KiddZimaHater
                            I think my late Grandfather had this tunneling bug!!
                            When he retired, him and Granny moved from their big house into a small, 2 bedroom house.
                            The new home had no basement. And being in Kansas (Tornado alley), Grandpa wouldn't stand for that!
                            So he rigged a conveyor belt to the bed of his truck, and began digging.
                            He dug-out a 2 room basement, 8 ft. deep, and lined the walls with concrete.
                            He was in his early 80's when he did it, and he did it all by himself, and all by hand.
                            I was impressed.

                            See, thats always what put me off digging out the crawlspace of my last house, I wanted a conveyor so I wouldn't have to drag buckets of dirt through the house and it would be a lot of tedious work, where as the digging itself would seem slightly more fun and less tedious.


                            Also one of these would be nice.. little larger and metal of course, so it does not wear out. But siting down and doing it with my arms would be so much nicer then using a shovel. Then just plop on on the conveyor and outside it goes. I could see myself doing it a couple hours a day easily
                            Play Brutal Nature, Black Moons free to play highly realistic voxel sandbox game.

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                            • #15
                              My land up north is a drumlin field, so there's all kinds of giant boulders poking out everywhere. I have several shallow draws cut through the hillside as well, and it'd be freaking cool to have a cave in the side of one of them.

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