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  • A New Spitfire

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...#ixzz1rBML6YTI


    "You didn't climb in one. You put it on. You didn't fly it. You simply pointed it in the direction you wanted to go."


    I was the right airframe and the right powerplant come together just when it was needed most. It is so far past "form follows function" that it is a flying piece of art.

  • #2
    Very cool.

    Hopefully the owners won't let it be used for low level aerobatics at air shows and be able to keep it around for a long time.

    Steve

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    • #3
      The Supermarine Spitfire and the Dehaviland Mosquito are my two favorite aircraft. There is an original Spitfire hanging from the ceiling of the Museuim of science and Industry in Chicago. They got it right after WWII.

      .

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      • #4
        So if it has been restored to original spec, does the engine have a Tilly Orifice or is it original spec? He mentioned 400mph in a dive so I'm assuming he's got the "modified" engine as he didn't stall out crash and die.
        "The Administration does not support blowing up planets." --- Finally some SENSIBLE policy from the Gov!

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Grind Bastard
          So if it has been restored to original spec, does the engine have a Tilly Orifice or is it original spec? He mentioned 400mph in a dive so I'm assuming he's got the "modified" engine as he didn't stall out crash and die.
          I always thought it was "Mrs Schillings Orifice" or was her name Tilly


          small polo mint shaped device it the carb to stop fuel starvation when inverted



          Stuart

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          • #6
            I thought the plane only cut out for a few seconds when it was pushed over into a steep dive,and the carb floats lost it momentarily. The Germans were fuel injected,and did not suffer this problem,using it as a way to escape a spit.

            The British learned to roll the plane inverted before a dive to eliminate the problem.

            Also,I think spits could reach 600 MPH in a dive,but I don't at all blame the restorers for not pushing this point!

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            • #7
              Also,I think spits could reach 600 MPH in a dive,but I don't at all blame the restorers for not pushing this point!

              I think that resulted in airframe damage. AFAIK the P47 Thunderbolt was the only WW2 piston driven fighter to routinely break the sound barrier in a dive with no resulting airframe damage.

              Comment


              • #8
                Gorgeous rebuild -- kudos to the British team!

                No blue Rustoleum used in that restoration
                "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Blackadder
                  I always thought it was "Mrs Schillings Orifice" or was her name Tilly


                  small polo mint shaped device it the carb to stop fuel starvation when inverted



                  Stuart
                  Beatrice "Ms. Tilly" Schilling.

                  Just an interesting note... several of my engineer-heroes/inspirations hail from the UK.

                  "Tilly" is one of them. Thomas Tuohy is another.

                  Sadly, both of them have "left to work on other projects" which is rather sad... but hey. We wouldn't be here discussing this without their work.
                  "The Administration does not support blowing up planets." --- Finally some SENSIBLE policy from the Gov!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Tommy Flowers is another.
                    .

                    Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Beautiful job - I never knew it was going on and Biggin Hill is only about 12 miles away.

                      My dad had a rearview mirror from a Spitfire and it was the one non-personal thing I really wanted to keep when he passed away. Sadly, I never did find it among his things.

                      Incidentally, when I lived the other side of Gravesend there lived next door an old guy called Horatio Suckling. He had lived there since the 30's and told me about the day he found a famous WW2 fighter pilot called Ginger Lacey asleep (drunk) against the back wall of my house. He took him in to his parents and they made a big fuss of him and cooked him breakfast. It was a bit of a moment for me as I had read a story of 'Ginger Lacy - fighter pilot' in a boy's adventure book as a child.
                      Last edited by Peter.; 04-07-2012, 07:56 PM.
                      Peter - novice home machinist, modern motorcycle enthusiast.

                      Denford Viceroy 280 Synchro (11 x 24)
                      Herbert 0V adapted to R8 by 'Sir John'.
                      Monarch 10EE 1942

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                      • #12
                        For those who haven't seen this pretty entertaining clip starring a Spitfire scaring the heck out of a reporter:

                        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KEnOeITKZAA

                        Steve
                        Last edited by SteveF; 04-07-2012, 09:26 PM.

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                        • #13
                          A minor correction: the problem with the Rolls-Royce Merlin engine cutting out in the Battle of Britain was not fuel starvation, but over-enrichment under negative g conditions. i.e. when pushing the nose down for a dive.

                          The short term tactical answer was to enter a dive ‘off one wingtip’.

                          Eventually the SU carburettor was modified to make it g-tolerant, but the interim solution was to use Miss Shilling’s….er... restrictor, as has been mentioned. The brilliant lady (subsequently Mrs Naylor) identified that what was happening was that when the float temporarily became ineffective under negative g, the engine was being grossly overfuelled. The carb was fed by two fuel pumps, each able to deliver 20% over maximum demand. (There were two in case one failed). Excess flow was diverted by a relief valve. Miss Shilling developed the restrictor to limit the maximum flow to just above maximum engine demand.

                          Some consider that the rival Daimler-Benz approach using direct fuel injection was obviously better. Well, R-R deliberately avoided direct injection at that stage of development for two reasons. First, bearing in mind the Merlin was a compact high performance engine, they knew that they could get extra power with a carburettor, by virtue of the fact that it allowed the latent heat of evaporation of the fuel to give the equivalent of a 25degC reduction in charge temperature, giving a useful improvement in compression ratio. The other reason for preferring carbs was that Rolls were unhappy about having lots of small bore steel pipes and joints carrying pressurised fuel, with the risk of failure or leakage and fire.

                          None of this comes from my own head, but from one of a series of excellent books published by the Rolls-Royce Heritage Trust, in this case The Merlin in Perspective - the combat years by Alec Harvey-Bailey. Another superb companion from the RRHT is Rolls-Royce Piston Aero Engines - a designer remembers by A A Rubbra. These are high quality books, packed with illustrations and first-hand recollections, and to my mind are very good value for money.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Weren't there some people basically building brand new Spits and calling them restorations because they used one rib out of an elevator or rudder. Pushing the "This is my Grandfather's Axe" thing just a little bit by calling them reconstructions.
                            Forty plus years and I still have ten toes, ten fingers and both eyes. I must be doing something right.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Asquith
                              A minor correction: the problem with the Rolls-Royce Merlin engine cutting out in the Battle of Britain was not fuel starvation, but over-enrichment under negative g conditions. i.e. when pushing the nose down for a dive.

                              The short term tactical answer was to enter a dive ‘off one wingtip’.
                              Thanks for clarifying this.

                              Eventually the SU carburettor was modified to make it g-tolerant, but the interim solution was to use Miss Shilling’s….er... restrictor, as has been mentioned. The brilliant lady (subsequently Mrs Naylor) identified that what was happening was that when the float temporarily became ineffective under negative g, the engine was being grossly overfuelled. The carb was fed by two fuel pumps, each able to deliver 20% over maximum demand. (There were two in case one failed). Excess flow was diverted by a relief valve. Miss Shilling developed the restrictor to limit the maximum flow to just above maximum engine demand.
                              The legend goes she had "a similar problem" with one of the bikes she designed/raced on. Don't know if that part is true or not, regardless it's a fun story.
                              "The Administration does not support blowing up planets." --- Finally some SENSIBLE policy from the Gov!

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