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  • Where to begin??

    Hello All,

    I dont know if this is the right place to post this sorry if it is. Anyway, Hello! lol.

    I am welder by trade and I have always wanted to learn the machining side of metal working. So I made calls to the local vocational/technical schools around, guess what, nobody offers an adult course(of course) Well I did find one about 2 hours away, I am honestly thinking of making the drive in the fall. But if that doesnt happen, can anyone suggest some good books I should have on the shelf? Or where to begin? I have found Mr.Pete on you tube, but thats about it.

    I am wanting to learn all that I can about machining, it has fascinated me for a long time, and now since I am buying my own place I can actually set up a decent shop!

    Thanks,
    Chris

    P.S. I dont own any machines as of right now.But that is in the works...soon!

  • #2
    Originally posted by Tamper84
    Hello All,

    I dont know if this is the right place to post this sorry if it is. Anyway, Hello! lol.

    I am welder by trade and I have always wanted to learn the machining side of metal working. So I made calls to the local vocational/technical schools around, guess what, nobody offers an adult course(of course) Well I did find one about 2 hours away, I am honestly thinking of making the drive in the fall. But if that doesnt happen, can anyone suggest some good books I should have on the shelf? Or where to begin? I have found Mr.Pete on you tube, but thats about it.

    I am wanting to learn all that I can about machining, it has fascinated me for a long time, and now since I am buying my own place I can actually set up a decent shop!

    Thanks,
    Chris

    P.S. I dont own any machines as of right now.But that is in the works...soon!
    hi there
    I am an agricultural engineer to trade and have always been interested in machining as well.
    I have recently started to gather up some machine tools ,had the chance to buy a mill a couple of years ago and snapped it up and I am currently restoring a lathe which i had in storage for about a year.. (willson slant bed lathe, thread on this site.)
    i have downloaded as much as i could off of the internet,collected books and watched as much on utube as i can.. but am still learning and it gets frustrating when things go wrong or you waste some tooling with wrong speeds and feeds etc. and have no one to show you the best way to do things. so keep asking questions on this site, lots of help here
    here are some sites i found usefull
    .http://homepage3.nifty.com/amigos/index-e.html
    http://www.projectsinmetal.com/lathe-carriage-stop/
    http://www.john-tom.com/John-tom2Sized.jpg
    http://start-model-engineering.co.uk/
    Tom....

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    • #3
      until you can get access to machines, yours or a schools, the best thing you do is read read read....books mags whatever. I've been machining for 15 years but thinking about it and learning for 30 When you get machines its becomes second best thing you can do to advance your skill, but only slightly, and still very important. Maybe subscribe to the magazine? buy a used high school sr text? read read read.

      With a bunch of learning under my belt from all that reading, machines to work on and full of enthusiasm I'd not have the patience to get through a course unless it was one those "come on in and use the machines and ask if you need help". Not much of a course guy...but everyone's different.
      .

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      • #4
        The Internet Archive has hundreds of old machinist books that can be downloaded for free. The newer ones are still very relevant.

        Also "how to run a Lathe" Southbend

        Machine shop Practice by Moltrecht Industrial press

        Hsm and Machinist Workshop magazines Village Press (this forum sponsor)
        The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

        Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

        Comment


        • #5
          Darrel Hollands videos put out by the AGI (American Gunsmith Institute) are expensive but not as much so if you consider tuition, driving expenses etc.
          A significant advantage is being able to revisit topics as the need arises.

          The videos sold by our host are also good but don't go into as much depth. The videos from MIT and You Tube will also help get you started.
          Byron Boucher
          Burnet, TX

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          • #6
            Thank You all for the help. I was hoping to get into a course somewhere so I at least know the different parts of the machines (maybe lol) and also, what to look for when purchasing some machines. Knowing my luck I would buy a piece of junk lol! Thanks for all of the links and the book suggestions.


            Thanks,
            Chris
            Last edited by Tamper84; 04-11-2012, 07:12 PM.

            Comment


            • #7
              Someone here must have a link to MIT -(the Massachusits-spelling, Institute of technology) i think it is , they had some great videos,, then of course there's all the videos tubal cain has on here, quite good.

              Try Googling those two, Think Tubal Cains was something like "Pete222".?

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              • #8
                here is a link to videos from MIT on machining [free]

                http://techtv.mit.edu/videos/142-machine-shop-1

                Comment


                • #9
                  Thanks Bill for posting that, i knew someone here would have it!!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I wouldn't like to try to learn without having the machines ..it would be very dificult..

                    I don't think I would pick anything up ..just by watching videos etc alone ..
                    Ii think you sound so keen ..that you should just go out and purchase the machines you need first ......then learn.
                    Best thing, I think ...is find someone on here who is near, to take you on for a couple of hours and teach you a bit , whilst working on a real machine .

                    all the best.markj

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by loose nut
                      The newer ones are still very relevant.
                      wait what?

                      ----
                      Proud machining permanoob since September 2010

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                      • #12
                        "Tubalcain" (mrpete222) on YouTube has dozens and dozens of nice beginner videos on all sorts of machining subjects.

                        He used to be a shop teacher so he does a very thorough job explaining things.....
                        Last edited by T.Hoffman; 04-11-2012, 08:02 PM.

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                        • #13
                          Thanks guys. I have been watching tubalcain's videos on you tube. I know I have to get in front of a machine to actually learn, just didnt know about books and such. And if anyone on here would like to give classes I would love to learn, I am in South east ohio, about 30 minutes south of Wheeling WV lol.

                          Oh I did find another local school that has Tooling and Machining in there programs, Im just waiting to hear back from them about adult classes. Again thank you to you all!

                          Thanks,
                          Chris

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by madwilliamflint
                            wait what?

                            The newer ones from the '20"s are still relevant, in most ways, for working in a home shop.

                            Basic machining, at least for amateurs, hasn't changed much. Not talking about CNC and the newer carbide speeds and feeds etc. Threading is still threading, turning is still turning.
                            The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

                            Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I don't think you can do much better without a machine yet, if you watch the videos and read, read, and re-watch the videos.

                              Some pretty basic starting out info there, along with excellent reference stuff like terms etc for procedures, tooling descriptions etc. Good Stuff!

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