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  • #31
    Artful, you are right about the axis of the pivot being inline with the front tire contact point for neutral steering of the rear end. The way I explained it was in error. The idea remains though about being able to steer the rear by varying the angle of the pivot axis.

    You would probably start with the pivot axis inline with the front tire contact patch, then vary the angle to test the effect of steering the rear end. If one were to make this part adjustable on the frame, you could always weld it up solid once the proper setting was found. Same for the steering tube angle. If doing this results in a heavier frame than is acceptable, then you could always make up another frame with the correct angles built-in.

    This might be seen as wasteful of material, but without having been able to go through a trial and adjustment process, you would never know if your design had the potential to be improved or optimized.
    I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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    • #32
      Darryl, after writing my last post I have been thinking if it is true (about the neutral point)?

      If the steering is turned while the front part is vertical the contact patch will move off the vehicle centreline due to the castor angle of the front wheel (or maybe that should be called 'trail' on a bike?). So there would be some steering effect on the rear at low speed when the front is vertical but maybe it will even out once the vehicle is moving and the front leans? I cant quite figure it out but either way I feel this would be insignificant or at least within the rider/driver's scope to allow for.

      This is a very interesting subject and it may be necessary to braze up a simple test vehicle!

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