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  • 1936 Assembly

    I suspect this has been posted before, but it is 10 minutes of fascination.

    http://www.dump.com/assemblyline/

    Pops

  • #2
    Looks like a huge potential for loss of limb on that frame riveting floor!. It is fascinating to watch.

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    • #3
      anyone know what the music is called ..i fancy that on my next video .

      all the best.markj

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      • #4
        Great clip thanks
        Of all the things I've lost its my mind I miss the most

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        • #5
          Excellent. I never did get a good look at the emblem. Does anyone recognize the brand of the car?

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          • #6
            "Master Hands (1936) Chevrolet Manufacturing"

            Full version here (27 minutes):-
            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8bT6t...eature=related

            Cheers

            .

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            • #7
              So how soon did you take to figure that it was Chevy's they was building? I knew as soon as I saw the Knee Action Front suspension.
              Can you imagine standing there and every 4 seconds or so, dropping in three rivets in their holes like that poor guy was, and doing that for 8 or 10 hrs a day!
              Great video thanks for sharing.
              _____________________________________________

              I would rather have tools that I never use, than not have a tool I need.
              Oregon Coast

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              • #8
                they were built so solidly ..its a wonder they ever wore out ..

                that knee action suspension looks like it would weigh as much as one of todays engines

                all the best.markj

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by aboard_epsilon
                  they were built so solidly ..its a wonder they ever wore out ..
                  Yes they had more metal in them, but it was inferior to what we use today. The tolerances were also much wider (sloppier) than today which is why we can get 250,000 miles out of an engine.

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                  • #10
                    Yes, i noticed the pistons were only machined on the top face ...the rest was just cast..

                    wonder what that large muffin type thing was, that they were inserting hundreds of pins into.... it was part of a sand casting

                    all the best.markj

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                    • #11
                      Interesting video, thanks much for posting that!!

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                      • #12
                        Really wild that the whole assembly line was made to put together just that ONE chassis..... couldn't build any other one unless everything was changed.

                        I thought the semi-automation was pretty cool.... the "bird head" riveters, all that material and complex machinery to assemble one type chassis. carriages and jigs and carriers sliding this way and that, who figured that all out? Those factory engineers had an interesting job.
                        2730

                        Keep eye on ball.
                        Hashim Khan

                        Everything not impossible is compulsory

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                        • #13
                          I was alarmed watching one guy place rivets, standing between the machines, and getting them in just before the machine advances and sets the rivet. Then watching carefully I saw that the ones being set were not the ones he placed - he was about 4 rivets ahead. That's a much better plan than expecting a guy to pull his hand out just before the head comes down.
                          .
                          "People will occasionally stumble over the truth, but most of the time they will pick themselves up and carry on" : Winston Churchill

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                          • #14
                            That was a great period in our history. It was a time when everyone who wanted a job could find one. Although they didn't pay much, it was enough to keep familes together.

                            The early Chievrolets were great cars, too. They had a wonderful engine and were very-well built. My uncle was a Chevrolet dealer in Columbus, Ohio from the 1920's to the 1960's. I even got a ride in the very first production Corvette that he ever got at his dealership.

                            .

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by aboard_epsilon
                              wonder what that large muffin type thing was, that they were inserting hundreds of pins into.... it was part of a sand casting.
                              -Not sure if they were inserting pins, or just using pins to clear vent holes. (And maybe holding more in case they dropped a pin all the way through.)

                              But in any case, those were lifters.

                              Doc.
                              Doc's Machine. (Probably not what you expect.)

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