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  • Compressor recommendations

    I need expert advice on Compressors.
    I'm in the market for a shop compressor, and don't know which brand to buy.
    I need at least 6 CFM's at 90 PSI to run my die grinders.
    And I'd like to get a large one with a 60 or 80 gallon tank.
    Kobalt (Lowe's) has received bad reviews.
    There's also Campbell-Hausfeld, Husky (Home Depot), Craftsman, Dewalt, Horror Freight, etc.
    So many brands to choose from.
    What do you guys recommend? And how dependable have your compressors been?

  • #2
    Some additional brands to consider
    • DV (aka Devair and Devilbiss)
    • Ingersoll Rand
    • Speedaire
    • Quincy


    If you are interested in validating your anticipated CFM consumption, take
    a look at pages 9-10 here:
    Information Bulletin IFB-01
    March 2007
    Devair

    "This booklet is primarily geared to assist both Distributors and
    Customers in determining air demands in a shop, and designing
    a compressed air system to suit."


    Some other resources:
    Time spent looking at commercial and industrial quality compressors can
    provide insight that is useful in evaluating consumer grade equipment.

    .

    Comment


    • #3
      Ingersoll's booklet

      .

      Comment


      • #4
        I have a Campbell-Hausfeld, Medallion Series "Professional" (no less) from Home Depot, that's been running fine for at least 15 years now.

        It's the 30gal tank. It claims 9.1CFM @90 psi and 11.5 @ 40.
        Lynn (Huntsville, AL)

        Comment


        • #5
          I'm not sure 6 cfm is large enough to run a die grinder they are air hogs! Typically a 5 hp 2 stage air compressor producing app. 18 cfm will run quite abit using a typical die grinder. Just fyi....

          Comment


          • #6
            The die grinders i've seen require around 4-5 cfm.

            Comment


            • #7
              My experience in hindsight.

              I bought a single stage 5HP IR from tractor supply several years ago. I would not do that again. I have a bead blast cabinet that is my largest demand. About 15 years ago I bought a Senco twin tank two stage wheelbarrow type compressor that worked very good. If you have a fairly large tank a small compressor will meet most usage demands. Even with the blast cabinet the actual duty cycle is not that continuous.
              Byron Boucher
              Burnet, TX

              Comment


              • #8
                A large storage capacity is good, the Amish in my area use those BIG "Bullet" shaped horizontal tanks for their air storage for both their shops and houses.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Robo
                  I'm not sure 6 cfm is large enough to run a die grinder they are air hogs! Typically a 5 hp 2 stage air compressor producing app. 18 cfm will run quite abit using a typical die grinder. Just fyi....
                  A larger capacity system will be cheaper in the long term as even though you are only wanting to run die grinders now , later you will find that more tools are added and you once adequate compressor cant hack it .
                  Michael

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Most published air tool usage rates are based on "average cfm" not their "peak" or "real" cfm. I'm telling you from experience if you try to run a die grinder with a 6 cfm air compressor you are going to be disappointed....they use alot of air.

                    If you are going to invest I would buy a small 2 stage air compressor or a "true" 5 hp commercial unit and be done with it. They can be had fairly cheap if you're patient.
                    Last edited by Robo; 04-21-2012, 09:28 PM.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Quincy is considered by many to be the ultimate in air compressors, but Debilviss, IR, and Speedair also make fine equipment. Two stage is much more efficient than single, but does cost more.

                      Most of the big box store compressors will give marginal performance. I have a Craftsman 1 1/2 HP portable unit for when I need air outside of the shop, but it really does not perform well. My shop compressor is one I built myself with a Debilviss twin cylinder single stage pump from the Surplus Center and a used 65 gallon tank from an old automotive lift. It does very well unless I'm sandblasting, then I have to wait & let it catch up.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Regarding grinding. Consider whether an electric die grinder like the Dewalt
                        DW887
                        or DW888 might be substituted for some or all situations where an
                        air-powered die grinder is used. I have a few brand name die grinders
                        and several imports fitted with a selection of burrs, drums and wheels.
                        However, I picked up a DW887 for heavy work.

                        As noted, heavy die grinding consumes a lot of air. Air is expensive,
                        electricity less so. Electric d-grinders are bulkier, but if the roughing work
                        can be managed with one of these, then intermittant detail work with a
                        air-powered die grinder can be powered by a lower capacity compressor.

                        An issue with buying more capacity than routinely required is that then
                        every time air is required, the big motor has to be powered up. A
                        work-around is to have two smaller compressors. This approach, using
                        a couple of portables together with an extra receiver/tank served my
                        hobby needs until recently when I purchased a higher capacity stationary
                        machine.

                        .

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Supplemental to the previous post.

                          I have no personal experience with them, but the Foredom Flex Shaft
                          grinder
                          has many satisfied users. This might be a suitable
                          substitute for an air die grinder on fine detailing work.

                          .

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by KiddZimaHater
                            I need expert advice on Compressors.
                            I'm in the market for a shop compressor, and don't know which brand to buy.
                            I need at least 6 CFM's at 90 PSI to run my die grinders.
                            And I'd like to get a large one with a 60 or 80 gallon tank.
                            Kobalt (Lowe's) has received bad reviews.
                            There's also Campbell-Hausfeld, Husky (Home Depot), Craftsman, Dewalt, Horror Freight, etc.
                            So many brands to choose from.
                            What do you guys recommend? And how dependable have your compressors been?
                            What you are after is a compressor that has a good "free air delivery" at the compressor (outlet) as there will be line (pressure and volume) losses until it gets to the tool which requires the 6CFM and 90 psi at the tool while the tool is under load.

                            Here is my compressoror -

                            http://i200.photobucket.com/albums/a...mpressor_1.jpg



                            which is pressurised to 10 Bar (145 psi) and has an air input (suction) of 8.65 CFM but only has a free air delivery (FAD) of 4.15 CFM.

                            With a big demand such as a 3/8" x 10"/min plasma cutter it is struggling - but gets there as I ease up when I hear the compressor.

                            With air tools that require 90 psi at the tool I set the regulator to 130psi. Its marvellous how much the relulator (air line) pressure drops when a demand from say an air grinder or an impact wrench is put on it.

                            My compressor has been 100% reliable and does all that I want of it.

                            Larger compressors require a lot more power which may mean up-grading a single-phase circuit or installing 3-phase power (the better option if you have it).

                            If you intend to get an air-blast gun/cabinet, work backwards from the cabinet requirements toward the compressor.

                            Here is my next compressor.

                            https://www.machineryhouse.com.au/C506

                            It is big enough for a small air-blast cabinet and can handle my plasma cutter easily. I am independent of shop power and can work with it any where on the property - outside is easy.

                            Here is a small sand-blast cabinet - note the air requirements.

                            https://images.machineryhouse.com.au/S288/0/700

                            https://www.machineryhouse.com.au/S288

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by oldtiffie
                              What you are after is a compressor that has a good "free air delivery" at the compressor (outlet) as there will be line (pressure and volume) losses until it gets to the tool which requires the 6CFM and 90 psi at the tool while the tool is under load.

                              Here is my compressoror -

                              http://i200.photobucket.com/albums/a...mpressor_1.jpg



                              which is pressurised to 10 Bar (145 psi) and has an air input (suction) of 8.65 CFM but only has a free air delivery (FAD) of 4.15 CFM.

                              With a big demand such as a 3/8" x 10"/min plasma cutter it is struggling - but gets there as I ease up when I hear the compressor.

                              With air tools that require 90 psi at the tool I set the regulator to 130psi. Its marvellous how much the relulator (air line) pressure drops when a demand from say an air grinder or an impact wrench is put on it.

                              My compressor has been 100% reliable and does all that I want of it.

                              Larger compressors require a lot more power which may mean up-grading a single-phase circuit or installing 3-phase power (the better option if you have it).

                              If you intend to get an air-blast gun/cabinet, work backwards from the cabinet requirements toward the compressor.

                              Here is my next compressor.

                              https://www.machineryhouse.com.au/C506

                              It is big enough for a small air-blast cabinet and can handle my plasma cutter easily. I am independent of shop power and can work with it any where on the property - outside is easy.

                              Here is a small sand-blast cabinet - note the air requirements.

                              https://images.machineryhouse.com.au/S288/0/700

                              https://www.machineryhouse.com.au/S288
                              Tiffie, looks good but dont leave any unleaded fuel in the carby if you are not going to use it for a while as you will have to replace the seals and clean all the dried crud out before it wiil start .
                              I have a three cylinder compressor with the same motor and it will handle most of my requirements out of the shop.
                              Michael

                              Comment

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