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What's wrong with this Bridgeport?

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  • What's wrong with this Bridgeport?

    Hi,

    Looking to pick up a J head Bridgeport for hobby use. Found a newer model, for sale. It's got a problem. As stated in the ad:

    "Being sold as parts repair
    Sold as is where this is for parts repair
    “Head Quill Feed is locked” Head Runs but Gears Quill Gears are engaged"

    I asked for clarification, "Are you saying that when you power up the head, the quill begins a power down feed, and can't be stopped?"

    He sent back: "yes it is lock on . needs to be taken apart and looked at. this is being sold as parts repair."

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/110863508952...#ht_1055wt_974



    Does anyone here have a good guess as to what's wrong, and how difficult/much is this going to cost to fix?

    I like projects, always like fixer-upper machines. But I'd hate to spend more on this than just buying a decent running machine....
    1934 South Bend 9" lathe, Tradesman 16 speed drill press, Grizzly 4x6" band saw. (Sad, I know...)

  • #2
    think the lever is over in power down feed mode .

    see it at the side of the oiler half way down the head ..

    so all that is required is to move the lever the other direction .


    edit forget that .......its out of power feed ..

    but there is another lever the otherside ..if left in power down feed locks the quill .

    doubt its going to be as simple as that though.

    could be something to do with the Quill spring if not the lever.


    all the best.markj
    Last edited by aboard_epsilon; 04-22-2012, 04:30 PM.

    Comment


    • #3
      I can't imagine that it would cost more than $100 to perhaps $200 to fix, and some time. The photos show that the feed gear is set to the "disengage" setting. I don't see any closeup of the up-neutral-down selector and finally the clutch(?) setting, but there are the three ways of disconnecting the quill drive from actually moving the quill. Drive gear, direction selector, clutch.

      None are terribly complicated or expensive.

      It's probably something as simple as the key way for disengaging the feed drive gear is gone or broken and no one has disengaged the clutch or located the neutral position. Not a lot of things that can go wrong, and all are fairly cheap to fix.

      Good luck.

      Comment


      • #4
        Nothing that can't be fixed. How's the rest of it? Start with scrap price.

        Comment


        • #5
          It's possible the engage mechanism is assembled wrong and is in when it shows out. Or the pin holding the engage gear is broke and the gear stays engaged. What ever the fault, it is worth looking into if the rest of the mill is not worn too much. Chances are the problem is small. One can always remove and not use the power feed.
          Krutch


          Mentally confused and prone to wandering!

          Comment


          • #6
            That looks like a steal!
            The table's clean, no dings.
            It comes WITH a digital readout.
            Looks like its in goood shape.
            Just tear apart the quill feed, replace any broken parts, and you'll be a happy camper.

            Comment


            • #7
              As a worst case scenario, good J heads arent that expensive to buy used nor are they rare. I prefer a step pulley over the Varispeed head, and those can be had in good shape for <$300.
              "I am, and ever will be, a white-socks, pocket-protector, nerdy engineer -- born under the second law of thermodynamics, steeped in the steam tables, in love with free-body diagrams, transformed by Laplace, and propelled by compressible flow."

              Comment


              • #8
                Worst case scenario it will run without any of the power feed gubbins, mine has been like that for 8 years or so, just never got round to needing or fixing it.
                .

                Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



                Comment


                • #9
                  If you can get it for cheap, I'd jump on it. There is an abundance of literature and knowledgable people on the internet who could help you.

                  When I got my Webb Mill (Large BP clone) the downfeed worked but it was intermittent. Small wonder. When I got it home, I didassembled the head completely and found that one of the two gears on the end of the worm cradle had three broken teeth. I replaced both gears and all was well.

                  Those heads are very straightforward when you get them apart. You should have little trouble finding the problem.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Buy it .Get a manual take it apart and fix it . All you will spend is time. You probably don`t even need any parts except may be a woodruff key are two. It a 5 hour job to take the head all apart and put it back together with the book. You may need 10 hours if you haven`t been in one before. Just follow the manual .
                    Every Mans Work Is A Portrait of Him Self
                    http://sites.google.com/site/machinistsite/TWO-BUDDIES
                    http://s178.photobucket.com/user/lan...?sort=3&page=1

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Well, define "cheap"... Opening bid is $1,000. Seem reasonable?

                      I've been looking at mills for a year, I see M heads frequently for $600-900, J heads in the $1500-2500 range. I'd really like the J, with the square-ram.

                      I'm just a little suspicious since the seller has over a hundred milling machines, lathes, grinders, etc, up for auction. His saying he simply "doesn't know" what's wrong makes me think he knows what's wrong, and doesn't feel it's cost-effective to repair first...

                      Perhaps it isn't a big deal to repair, from what you guys are saying.

                      1934 South Bend 9" lathe, Tradesman 16 speed drill press, Grizzly 4x6" band saw. (Sad, I know...)

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Don't worry about the power feed -trivial to fix; worry about the important stuff! How's the spindle bearings, the R8 taper, the entire vari-speed mess, the back gear dog clutch ($$), the saddle ways, the...?
                        Last edited by lakeside53; 04-22-2012, 08:57 PM.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by delagem
                          Well, define "cheap"... Opening bid is $1,000. Seem reasonable?

                          I've been looking at mills for a year, I see M heads frequently for $600-900, J heads in the $1500-2500 range. I'd really like the J, with the square-ram.

                          I'm just a little suspicious since the seller has over a hundred milling machines, lathes, grinders, etc, up for auction. His saying he simply "doesn't know" what's wrong makes me think he knows what's wrong, and doesn't feel it's cost-effective to repair first...
                          To me $1k is about average for a Bport in the northeast and midwest US. I would try to get that machine down to ~$700 and call it good myself.

                          IMHO, if youre looking mainly on ebay and craigs youre looking mainly in the wrong place. You need to attend a few auctions or shop closing sales as the northeast is full of them every summer and the prices generally

                          Regarding your suspicions, you may be correct but I wouldnt necessarily agree. Some dealers simply do not repair machines. Their revenue is generated by turning around quantities of machinery, not quality.
                          "I am, and ever will be, a white-socks, pocket-protector, nerdy engineer -- born under the second law of thermodynamics, steeped in the steam tables, in love with free-body diagrams, transformed by Laplace, and propelled by compressible flow."

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            If its in Gresham Oregon ( lewis machinery) then he knows whats wrong with but seems like he's closing up shop and auctioning off so I doubt he would mess around fixing it. Might be a OK deal. I always thought his stuff was priced a little too high for the casual hobbiest
                            If its not in Gresham OR. disreguard the above

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by lakeside53
                              Don't worry about the power feed -trivial to fix; worry about the important stuff! How's the spindle bearings, the R8 taper, the entire vari-speed mess, the back gear dog clutch ($$), the saddle ways, the...?
                              Ack! You're not filling me with confidence!

                              It's an eBay auction, machine is a few hundred miles away, in Watertown, CT. I have the equipment to move it.

                              It's not really possible to check those things because of the auction nature, and distance. (Not to mention a lack of skill and or knowledge on my part!)
                              1934 South Bend 9" lathe, Tradesman 16 speed drill press, Grizzly 4x6" band saw. (Sad, I know...)

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