Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

material suggestion

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • material suggestion

    I am having a 20 hp flute styple pump rebuilt. Since this pumps is being used for features in a waterpark. I am curious as to what material you would recomend. Traditionally it has been bronze, but that just gets eaten over time by the chlorine in the water. There are some new composites that we are thinking of trying.

    I am open to suggestions.

    Also for recomendations on grease for this application.

    Rob

  • #2
    What is a flute style pump?
    Play Brutal Nature, Black Moons free to play highly realistic voxel sandbox game.

    Comment


    • #3
      Picture of a Flute pump

      Basically it is a long shaft pump that is installed vertically. It can be 4' long or 30' long. It depends on the depth of the pit and the size of the wallet of the guy buying it! LOL



      Hope that helps..of course this picture was taken just as we unloaded it off the trailer, so it is horizontal.

      Rob

      Comment


      • #4
        how about 316L, suppose it would last longer however
        http://www.mcnallyinstitute.com/04-html/4-1.html
        might help
        mark

        Comment


        • #5
          I took my kids to a water park and all I saw was what looked like PVC but I do not believe I ever saw the pumping system.... CRES steel was the first thing that came to mind.

          Comment


          • #6
            Stainless steel isn't a good choice. Chlorine eats it alive. Any sort of chlorides are hard on it but but pool chlorine is even worse. Just a month ago the chlorine pump metering system at the town pool failed and began pumping in full strength chlorine into the pool while a swim meet was going on. Sent about 30 kids to the hospital. Fortunately nearly all only had minor problems. It was apparently due to materials failure.

            Composites and plastics are the best bet, especially PTFE type materials. Glass filled PTFE would be a good choice.

            This is what SS looks like after prolonged exposure to chlorine:

            Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

            Comment


            • #7
              How much time does it actually take for the bronze pump to be destroyed? We have several of these style pumps, though they are multi-stage. They do go south occasionally, but the time span to failure doesn't make it feasible to look for better impeller material.

              Mark

              Comment


              • #8
                How about the heavy plastic pipe used for water mains? Might need some additional stucture to carry the pump motor.

                Dave Cameron

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Evan
                  Stainless steel isn't a good choice. Chlorine eats it alive. Any sort of chlorides are hard on it but but pool chlorine is even worse. Just a month ago the chlorine pump metering system at the town pool failed and began pumping in full strength chlorine into the pool while a swim meet was going on. Sent about 30 kids to the hospital. Fortunately nearly all only had minor problems. It was apparently due to materials failure.

                  Composites and plastics are the best bet, especially PTFE type materials. Glass filled PTFE would be a good choice.

                  This is what SS looks like after prolonged exposure to chlorine:

                  i stand corrected, nice photo of intercrystaline or whatever corrosion it is
                  thanks Evan
                  mark

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    What part of the pump? Impeller and case or piping? With DEEP pockets, titanium impeller and case. They are unaffected by chlorine or chlorides, at least at the concentrations that prevail in a waterpark.
                    Duffy, Gatineau, Quebec

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Duffy
                      What part of the pump? Impeller and case or piping? With DEEP pockets, titanium impeller and case. They are unaffected by chlorine or chlorides, at least at the concentrations that prevail in a waterpark.
                      G. SANDERSON & J. C. SCULLY

                      Department of Metallurgy, University of Leeds.

                      IT has been known for more than 10 years that titanium alloys suffer from intergranular stress corrosion cracking
                      if they are in contact with chlorides at elevated temperatures (> 250° C), but it was only 18 months ago that
                      Brown(1) discovered that stress corrosion failures could occur at room temperature in a 3 per cent solution of sodium
                      chloride. Titanium alloys are highly resistant to pitting attack in chloride solutions, and in order to investigate crack
                      propagation rather than crack initiation, Brown used specimens of titanium alloy in the form of notched rectangular bars
                      which had been fatigued in air until fine cracks had formed at the base of the notch. He found with static load tests that
                      under plain strain conditions a 3 per cent solution of sodium chloride caused a decrease in the resistance of the alloy to
                      the further propagation of the crack. This was a very important result, as it indicated that the stress corrosion resistance
                      of titanium alloys under marine conditions depended on the resistance of the surface oxide on the alloy to the solution
                      and not on the intrinsic resistance of the alloy lattice to the propagation of a stress corrosion crack which is the only
                      really safe criterion.

                      Brown, B. F. , and Beachem, C. D. , Corr. Sci., 5, 745 (1965). | Article |

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        im surprised, because in my swimming pool (and any other around here) everything is either from stainless steel or bronze. it must have a decent life expectancy, otherwise all the pool companies would be out of business. maybe you just have to take the right bronze and the right stainless?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Eh, While no expert in the field, If corrosion is the issue and the water is rather clean without abrasives, What about plastics? Like those glass filled nylons and such? Might need to beef up the design some, but I would think they would be immune to corrosion.
                          Play Brutal Nature, Black Moons free to play highly realistic voxel sandbox game.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            im surprised, because in my swimming pool (and any other around here) everything is either from stainless steel or bronze. it must have a decent life expectancy, otherwise all the pool companies would be out of business. maybe you just have to take the right bronze and the right stainless?
                            There is a big difference between the recommended chlorine levels for home pools versus public pools. You need very little chlorine for a home pool with only family and a few friends using the pools. Public pools have to be able to kill any and everything that might end up in the pools. Better than chlorine for a home pool is to use trace iodine treatment. Even better if the pool is inside then use a UV sterilizer and no chemicals.
                            Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Evan
                              Public pools have to be able to kill any and everything that might end up in the pools.
                              Out of context this one would be a real publicity headline in the yellow press

                              "Today, at [removed] public pool in the state of [removed], 332 dead bodies are floating around."
                              Amount of experience is in direct proportion to the value of broken equipment.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X