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  • Trying to remove a stuck post in casting

    Hi -

    I have a question on removing a threaded post from a casting. I have a steel post, 5/16" diameter that is about 2" long. It's only threaded about 1/2" from the end. The other end I am quite sure after doing some research is threaded into the casting, not pressed in.

    In trying to remove it, I tried putting 2 nuts on the threaded end, tightening them together and then putting a wrench on the inner one and unscrewing it - but I can't seem to get the two nuts to jam together tight enough - they start to spin together on the shaft before the threaded portion in the casting releases.

    So - I have come up with another idea and want to see what people think of it.
    1 - Permanently loctite a nut to the threaded end
    2 - wrench the post out of the casting using that loctited nut
    3 - Take the propane torch and heat the nut until the loctite is released

    Sound like a decent plan? Or is there something else that a rank beginner isn't thinking of that's easier?

    Thanks !

  • #2
    The loctite is unlikely to hold.

    Use a stud remover - looks like a socket but has cams inside.

    or... Weld a nut on the end, or, drill it out then colapse the threads with a punch, or use a small pipe wrench.
    Last edited by lakeside53; 04-26-2012, 10:08 PM.

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    • #3
      Also if stud is long enough use all the nuts you can muster.
      mark costello-Low speed steel

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      • #4
        I was going to suggest welding a nut flush with the end & when out out just grind off the weld unthread the nut to straighten out the threads.
        "Let me recommend the best medicine in the
        world: a long journey, at a mild season, through a pleasant
        country, in easy stages."
        ~ James Madison

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        • #5
          Loctite won't hold if the double nuts didn't work. Do you need the stud or can you replace it?

          You can use a stud remover as suggested but if you don't need the stud, just use a pair of vice grips. If that won't do it, weld a nut on as suggested.


          EDIT: By the way, the "post" is called a "stud".
          Last edited by Fasttrack; 04-26-2012, 11:03 PM.

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          • #6
            Hi - thanks for all the suggestions. We'll scrap the loctite idea I guess

            I am trying to preserve the stud. I'll search out a stud remover and give that a go if the "many nuts" approach does not work.

            Thanks again !

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            • #7
              Originally posted by lakeside53
              The loctite is unlikely to hold.

              Use a stud remover - looks like a socket but has cams inside.

              or... Weld a nut on the end, or, drill it out then colapse the threads with a punch, or use a small pipe wrench.
              The cam or roller clutch type stud removers work very well but they are size specific so be prepared to buy a set.
              Ah, more tools.

              The other suggestions work well too if you don't have to save the stud. Just make sure you have some movement if possible to save time drilling it out if possible.

              Here's what the cam type stud removers look like.

              Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
              Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

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              • #8
                cycle it a couple of times with a propane torch, you don't have to get it super, cool with a wet rag. sometimes moves things enough to break whatever seal is at work.

                Another idea....I had a 2" pipe need undoing recently....24" pipe wrench with 4 feet of pipe on the handle...no go . Smashing the end of the pipe with BFH figuring the shock might work. Tried heating, man nothing would work. Finally had the idea impacting in the opposite direction, tightening it...somehow it jarred things enough that I got it apart.

                so maybe the double nuts with vise grip on them and a few smacks with a copper hammer in a clockwise direction
                .

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                • #9
                  I would try a couple of things:

                  Heat the casting, apply a little beeswax. Let it soak for a few moments.

                  Or, heat the casting, use some PB B'laster. Positively the best penetrating oil ever made. (NAPA, or AutoZone carries it where I live)

                  Or, heat the casting, use Loctite Freez-Away cold spray on the stud. Probably less heat than you'd think, I frequently use a small pencil-sized butane torch.


                  The suggestion to alternately tighten and then loosen is a good one. I've pulled many stuck studs from castings, and never needed anything beyond a double nut and these techniques. Heat and/or cold will definitely help!
                  1934 South Bend 9" lathe, Tradesman 16 speed drill press, Grizzly 4x6" band saw. (Sad, I know...)

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                  • #10
                    Gents -

                    I never stop being amazed at the knowledge contained in these forums and the willingness of people to assist the "just beginning" crowd - of which I am a full fledged member.

                    Willy - That cam stud remover is something I never knew about and seeing how it works is interesting. The first thought that came to mind though - is there a chance of damaging the smooth OD of the stud with the three cams if you are really coming aboard it?

                    Mcgyver - The BFG had me scratching my head for a minute - but then it came to me - haha.

                    I'm going to try the heat/cool cycle later today when I get back to the house - that, and maybe some Pblaster might work. The problem getting Pblaster to the threads is that the "stud" has an integral part that is greater OD at the end of the stud that goes into the casting, and if the threaded portion is smaller than the OD of this part, the Pblaster has to get under the "cylinder part" before it can reach the studs. Still, doesn't hurt to heat 'er up and lace it with the blaster as well.

                    The multiple nuts didn't work too well either - I think part of it is my apprehension of really coming aboard them - the threaded end is Whitworth threaded, and I don't want to bung them up as I don't have an easy way to fix them myself.

                    I'll report back with any progress/failures later and try and take a few pics of the thing too.

                    Thanks again !
                    Lewis

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                    • #11
                      That cam stud remover is something I never knew about and seeing how it works is interesting. The first thought that came to mind though - is there a chance of damaging the smooth OD of the stud with the three cams if you are really coming aboard it?
                      It all depends on how tight the stud is into the casting and how hard the stud's material is. If the stud's material is hard enough to resist deformation due to the removal process it will not leave much evidence of the procedure.
                      Whatever you can do to lessen the strain of removal will of course help.
                      Back and forth movements, however small will start things moving. Heat, lubricants, vibration will all aid the process.

                      Is there a possibility in case of a worst case scenario of replacing the stud with one that does not have Whitworth threads?
                      Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
                      Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

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                      • #12
                        Are you sure it is threaded into the base? You should be able to see some evidence of threads. If so,try some Kroil, it is the best penetrating stuff I have ever used. I would use vise grips on it if is is threaded. BIG vise grips. Bob.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Bob Fisher
                          Are you sure it is threaded into the base?
                          that was kind of nagging me as well...you say you've done some research; how sure are you and can you see the start of the threads?

                          on the Whitworth, since you're here there's a very good chance you have a lathe. If so, Whitworth are no more difficult to cut than regular threads, you'll want some thread wires if you don't have them....but they are not much $$.

                          Point being, preserve the stud if possible, but it's no biggy if you can't...what really matters is not messing up the casting.....you can always make a new stud.

                          if none of the ideas presented works, cut it off, drill it out and make new one
                          .

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                          • #14
                            Why is it nobody remembers to put a washer between the nuts when your trying to remove a stud, 2 nuts won't lock.

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                            • #15
                              Hi -
                              Just got back to the house and I am being told "we're going to the mall" - WTF?

                              Anyway, I'll try that washer between the nuts later.

                              The machine I am working on is a lathe - a charming old Raglan 5" from jolly England, and chatting with some fellows on the yahoo raglan group, one has told me his has been apart before and it was threaded - so I am just assuming they all are.

                              However - I cannot see the start of threads. I will re-check with the trusty Princess Auto 2 dollar loupe again though

                              Stay tuned....hopefully I'll have some quality time with the machine later.....after the mall....

                              Cheers,
                              Lewis

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