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  • Lodge Woot Skillet

    http://home.woot.com/
    Just bought a Woot 12" made in Tennessee Lodge skillet. Check out the raised ring & indented logo on the bottom. We have a 100 year old wood cookstove & I think by turning it upside down it will make awesome pancakes for my soon to be grandchild. I'm going to be a Grandpa! Also watch the video on how there made. Very cool product still made in the USA! And mothers day is coming guys.
    "Let me recommend the best medicine in the
    world: a long journey, at a mild season, through a pleasant
    country, in easy stages."
    ~ James Madison

  • #2
    Congratulations! Don't overheat that skillet or it can warp a little won't sit flat you won't be able to sleep for weeks. I have a Lodge 2-burner griddle I bought back in the '70s or early '80s and raised 4 teenagers doing French toast at least once a week, or pancakes, or grilled cheese, or you name it. After 10 years or so it's essentially nonstick. I did warp mine a little though. It's tempting to just turn them on high for about ten minutes to let them soak in the heat and then sear meat on them. But now I know it's risky.

    Personally I like Griswold, although they are expensive. They work just as well and weigh a lot less. I let go my seven pound no. 10 no-name cast iron skillet that was my mom's and hers before that (at least) and got a Griswold no. 10 skillet, weighed right in at four pounds. That makes a big difference sometimes!

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    • #3
      I forgot to mention that the pancake will have a raised exclamation point in it.
      "Let me recommend the best medicine in the
      world: a long journey, at a mild season, through a pleasant
      country, in easy stages."
      ~ James Madison

      Comment


      • #4
        Yeah, the Lodge cast iron skillets and stuff are made not far from here - South Pittsburgh, TN. I've occasionally seen the Lodge works shown on an episode of "How it's Made" or one of those shows.

        My wife got me a Lodge bacon flattener/press for Christmas. I had often mentioned seeing one in use at a cafe in Indiana, where I had breakfast many years ago. Too bad I don't cook bacon very often nowadays.

        Martin Stove Works, in my home town, Florence, AL also made skillets and such for many years. Don't know just when they stopped, but they continued to make cast iron stoves up until the last 10 or 12 years, I think. I have a couple of "Martin" skillets.

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        • #5
          A week after I got out of high school in 1964 I moved to SoCal. A few days later I bought a 12" iron fry pan at a K-Mart type store on Beach Blvd - don't recall the name, near where I lived in Midway City, California. Still have it, still works like new. I can't imagine how many meals have been cooked in that thing. I recall it cost about $8.00 which was about 4 hours pay at the time, and was the most expensive thing in the house.

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          • #6
            Cast iron is the very best in my opinion. Seasoned correctly and used properly nothing sticks to them.

            (Oh,,, and yes, used on a wood burning cookstove is the REAL place for them.)

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            • #7
              I agree that cast iron is hard to beat for cookware. It does, however, have ONE serious drawback. This is a little-understood technical fact:- it
              SLOWLY gets heavier over time. The Favorite #6 that I bought in the early sixties is one HELL of a lot heavier now, yet it LOOKS exactly as it did when I first bought it!
              There is A LOT of science that we just dont understand!
              Duffy, Gatineau, Quebec

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              • #8
                Never heard that before.
                Suppose it gradually absords grease and particles from the cooking?

                ...or maybe the user gets older and weaker!

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                • #9
                  That's why women don't cook with cast iron anymore.
                  "Let me recommend the best medicine in the
                  world: a long journey, at a mild season, through a pleasant
                  country, in easy stages."
                  ~ James Madison

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                  • #10
                    cast iron

                    Originally posted by flylo
                    That's why women don't cook with cast iron anymore.
                    They're in fear of catching the "SLOWLY gets heavier over time" disease?

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                    • #11
                      Most women are not as strong or stout these days because they don't do the demanding physical work of 70+ years ago. picking up a 12" cast iron scillett full of food os heavy. I'm glad these have the front assist handle.
                      "Let me recommend the best medicine in the
                      world: a long journey, at a mild season, through a pleasant
                      country, in easy stages."
                      ~ James Madison

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        re; Not as strong as 70 years ago:

                        Agreed , most women today could not handle the work load our grandmothers handled in those days. Havin babies, rearing kids, tons of laundry, not to mention the huge batches of bread baked everyweek, garden to tend to plus all the canning of preserves, then helping in the fields at harvest time, cooking huge meals for the harvest crews, then totaly tuckered out at bedtime, and having to put up with advances from a horny husband!!!
                        Those were "TOUGH" Women!!

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                        • #13
                          And many lived to the ripe old age of 60 ?

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by davidh
                            And many lived to the ripe old age of 60 ?
                            I think that in general they lived longer than today's people.

                            Age and longevity statistics are very misleading. It's certainly true that if you just consider the numbers and averages, it would seem to suggest people are living longer. But there were much higher infant mortality rates and vocational accident death rates back in those days, that, along with probably other factors, skew the numbers significantly.

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                            • #15
                              I've been using Lodge cast iron skillets, and dutch ovens for years. Gave the son an extra outdoor dutch oven and now he has been bitten by the bug.
                              Can't beat em for cooking, indoors or outside.

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