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Hitchzilla

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  • Hitchzilla

    My best friend recently bought a single screw Volvo semi truck to pull his horse trailer. Keep in mind that the trailer is 43 feet long and GVW fully loaded is around 20K. Anyway, he needed a gooseneck hitch custom built to bolt on the frame rails. A combination of some machining and welding, and the pics below show what I came up with. The area where the ball shank passes through is a full 1.5 inches. The skeleton framework on the botom is 2x2x.25 square tube.



    Arbo & Thor (The Junkyard Dog)

  • #2
    Hi,

    Looks pretty good. I don't think he'll have strength issues. Might put him over-weight though.

    dalee
    If you think you understand what is going on, you haven't been paying attention.

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    • #3
      I'm curious to know why you welded the ball on? Will make it tough to change in the future...
      Keith
      __________________________
      Just one project too many--that's what finally got him...

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      • #4
        Originally posted by LKeithR
        I'm curious to know why you welded the ball on? Will make it tough to change in the future...

        It is a complete custom job that will never go on another truck. We decided to weld the ball to the top plate and weld the nut to the framework on the bottom so that there was never any worry of the ball vibrating loose. This ball is 2 5/16 with a 2" diameter shank. There should never be any reason to change it, but if there is, I can cut the welds in about two minutes and get it off.
        Arbo & Thor (The Junkyard Dog)

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        • #5
          This is a little off topic but I'm curious about the tractor description as:
          a single screw Volvo semi truck
          It's not my field so this might be common but I don't remember hearing it and it's not immediately evident from context. My stretch guess is extrapolation from nautical use to suggest one driving axle in this case. Could you expand please?
          .
          "People will occasionally stumble over the truth, but most of the time they will pick themselves up and carry on" : Winston Churchill

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          • #6
            Originally posted by TGTool
            This is a little off topic but I'm curious about the tractor description as: It's not my field so this might be common but I don't remember hearing it and it's not immediately evident from context. My stretch guess is extrapolation from nautical use to suggest one driving axle in this case. Could you expand please?
            This would be my understanding as well. I have heard the term single screw used, but it isn't common. Usually they are just referred to as either a single axle tractor or tandem tractor.
            Only semantics of course, no biggie.

            Arbo, nice job on the hitch plate. Doesn't look like you're going to experience much flex between the frame rails.

            A little hard to tell from the pics but I'm assuming the mounting holes in the plate are for bolting up to mounting brackets that attach to the sides of the frame rails and not through the top. Judging by the spacing at least that's what it looks like.

            The reason I ask is I have seen someone drill the top of the rails...definitely an no-no.
            Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
            Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Willy
              This would be my understanding as well. I have heard the term single screw used, but it isn't common. Usually they are just referred to as either a single axle tractor or tandem tractor.
              Only semantics of course, no biggie.
              Some of the old timers that drove log trucks for my grandfather talked "screws" when I was a kid. In that case, they referred to driving axles, as some of the trucks had single or multiple non driving lift axles. Generally, the more screws you had (or needed) the more/less respected you were depending on who was doing the talking. Having seen a few accidents off road, I think I would like as few as possible and to stay on road.
              "I am, and ever will be, a white-socks, pocket-protector, nerdy engineer -- born under the second law of thermodynamics, steeped in the steam tables, in love with free-body diagrams, transformed by Laplace, and propelled by compressible flow."

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              • #8
                Assuming heavy truck differentials have a hypoid pinion I suppose 'screw' is not such a bad term to use.

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                • #9
                  IIRC I've seen military trucks with a differential that didn't look like the common hypoid. The drive shaft was right at the top of the case with a shape that looked like a worm so maybe the "screw" term was actually descriptive. If it has tandem driving axles that configuration would lend itself better to power pass through than the usual spiral bevel.
                  .
                  "People will occasionally stumble over the truth, but most of the time they will pick themselves up and carry on" : Winston Churchill

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                  • #10
                    Two words

                    Over Kill
                    James Kilroy

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                    • #11
                      Over Kill

                      Two of my favorite words!

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                      • #12
                        Maybe overkill, but rather safe than sorry. The truck is a single axle...One drive axle...single screw.
                        Arbo & Thor (The Junkyard Dog)

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                        • #13
                          20,000 lbs? Throw that ball away and use a fifth wheel and kin g pin.

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                          • #14
                            The OP may not be in the US thus the term screw and I agree gooseneck trailer usley refers to a fithwheel here in the states.
                            Craftsman 101.07403
                            Grizzly G0704
                            4x6 Bandsaw

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                            • #15
                              Im thinking about the welded ball? They were meant to be a bolted item. Whats the steel of the ball? If it has any med to high carbon content then the weld might have actually reduced the strength? I would NOT have welded on the ball.. Im thinking there is a major shear issue now. Decent fasteners, like the ball and nut have some higher carbon content and are meant for bolting applications ONLY and need the stretch of the bolt, many fasteners are a system and work better in strain. They are NOT weldments. JR
                              My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

                              https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

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