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  • what to do with a 10 ton punch press

    I bought a small shop out a few years back. In the pile was a benchmaster punch press in good working order on its stand, but no dies or shoes. I have plugged it in and stomped on the pedal.....but that is it in the last few years. I need to figure a use for it, or send it away. I offered it up for sale locally at $400 and had one buyer, but it never panned out, and I figured if it wasn't worth that much.....I would build something out of it or a die to do something.....but what?

  • #2
    If you weren't across the country from me, I would probably buy it from you right now! Have some parts that I have to hand work, would be great to have something like this for!

    It is basically a production piece of machinery. Most places will either make their own dies for it if they have a toolroom, otherwise they will have something made for them. Over the years I have made a great deal of temporary tooling for short runs as well.

    To use it, you would need to contract some parts for it, or have something you are selling that you need to run parts for.

    To sell it, you might try Craigslist if you haven't already, people can do searches from several hundred miles out. Perhaps Ebay. You can also try to find a machinery auction nearby, and contact the auctioneers, they might let you sell it there on consignment. One of the lathes I bought was at an estate auction; although not part of the estate, someone brought it there to be auctioned.

    Good luck!

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    • #3
      Punch presses can be useful tools...provided you have a use. Cost of setup and time make them not so useful for non-production use.

      Older ones have limited resale value. Primarily because the people that need and use them are in bigger shops where safety concerns are a big issue. To meet OSHA standards can be expensive on an older machine.

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      • #4
        I ran a giant one as a kid in a spring shop. I don't recall how big it was, but the flywheel was about 5' across and at least 8" wide. That thing could smoke big holes in 4140 like it was nothing. I had though of making some apparatus to help me fold damascuss steel.....but I have taken a shine to rifle building as of late, so knives are out.

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        • #5
          Hi,

          Does it have the dog clutch or pneumatic clutch/brake set up? I still have a little 5 ton Benchmaster press with the dog clutch. And I've rebuilt a few for others. I use mine to stamp sizes on punches and dies we make. I've built a couple of them into feed to length and cut-off machines for customers over the years.

          Since punch presses often get highly modified and adapted for particular jobs, the cost of meeting OSHA safety standards is of minor concern. And I've done enough of them over the years to know it's often a pretty simple job. So older presses are always in demand. But the overall market is limited, not many manufacturer's need such machines. And so long as you don't break the frame, they can be rebuilt nearly forever. I think the oldest press I ever rebuilt had a frame casting date from WW1.

          Hardest part of selling your Benchmaster is the size, or rather lack of it. Not much use for such a small press in most settings. Lack of tonnage and limited daylight really limit it's use. I honestly haven't priced one in years. Mine was free, but it had no motor and a bad crank. Both relatively easy fixes for me.

          dalee
          If you think you understand what is going on, you haven't been paying attention.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by dalee100
            Hi,

            Does it have the dog clutch or pneumatic clutch/brake set up? I still have a little 5 ton Benchmaster press with the dog clutch. And I've rebuilt a few for others. I use mine to stamp sizes on punches and dies we make. I've built a couple of them into feed to length and cut-off machines for customers over the years.

            Since punch presses often get highly modified and adapted for particular jobs, the cost of meeting OSHA safety standards is of minor concern. And I've done enough of them over the years to know it's often a pretty simple job. So older presses are always in demand. But the overall market is limited, not many manufacturer's need such machines. And so long as you don't break the frame, they can be rebuilt nearly forever. I think the oldest press I ever rebuilt had a frame casting date from WW1.

            Hardest part of selling your Benchmaster is the size, or rather lack of it. Not much use for such a small press in most settings. Lack of tonnage and limited daylight really limit it's use. I honestly haven't priced one in years. Mine was free, but it had no motor and a bad crank. Both relatively easy fixes for me.

            dalee
            It has the clutch/dog. It came with an air cylinder setup that I promptly robbed for another process.....its a clean machine that was used to punch watch batterys.

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            • #7
              Slugs
              washers
              fishing lures
              walnuts
              chain links
              embossing
              smash stuff
              piercing
              shearing
              folding
              pecans

              Comment


              • #8
                Hi,

                I'm not so sure there is enough pop in a little Benchmaster to crack pistachios. Maybe walnuts.

                I prefer the pneumatic clutch/brake setup, but the mechanical dog clutch is pretty reliable on these little presses. They certainly are simple to use and repair.

                It may be hard to sell for a good price since those who may be interested in buying it can be few. But if someone does want it, they will be very willing to pay pretty good money for it.

                dalee
                If you think you understand what is going on, you haven't been paying attention.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Punch Press

                  I could get some good use out of that one, but it's too far to drive.

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                  • #10
                    That's the key. Buy from someone who it's excess to & sell it to someone that needs it! Also you always make your money on the buy because the market sets the sell price in most cases.
                    "Let me recommend the best medicine in the
                    world: a long journey, at a mild season, through a pleasant
                    country, in easy stages."
                    ~ James Madison

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by dalee100
                      Hi,
                      .................................................. .........................................

                      Since punch presses often get highly modified and adapted for particular jobs, the cost of meeting OSHA safety standards is of minor concern. And I've done enough of them over the years to know it's often a pretty simple job. So older presses are always in demand. But the overall market is limited, not many manufacturer's need such machines. And so long as you don't break the frame, they can be rebuilt nearly forever. I think the oldest press I ever rebuilt had a frame casting date from WW1.

                      .................................................. ...............................................

                      Here's my experience on the safety requirements of punch presses.

                      I was helping setup a plant to do stamping. We had an opportunity to buy a number of Rouselle punch presses for near scrap price. They appeared to have had minimal usage. The plan was to buy them and send them back to Rouselle to rebuild as needed and bring up to current OSHA standards.

                      The response from Rouselle was a disappointment. Their quote indicated we would only save a little off current retail for the same amchine since retrofitting with air clutch and brake was so expensive.

                      From my own experience I know a punch press can be made totally "safe" very easily with simple guarding. Apparently, that's no longer enough for OSHA.

                      Back in the 1970's the retail prices of punch presses seemed to quadruple overnight because of the crazy product liability suits that were happening at the time. I remember seeing a Benchmaster at the local dealer. The "business" area of the press had a heavy wire mesh shield totally around it with a warning label saying something about "under no circumstance should this guarding be modified or removed". Of course, you couldn't use the machine without doing that.

                      The last punch press I bought was a 10 ton Perkins "horn" press with dual palm buttons for safety. This was at a machine shop auction, I was the only bidder at $25. Unbelievably low price for a horn press. I'm using it at home for my own projects.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Hi,

                        Your mistake was in going back to Rouselle for getting the work done. They are far more interested in selling new machines rather than fixing old ones. Hence the high cost. I've dealt with more than one manufacturer that operates that way. And honesty, I do the same with some things I make also.

                        Also fitting new clutch/brakes and controls has never been cheap. Makes me wonder why that needed to be done. Certainly not for OSHA.

                        Guarding gets modified all the time to make it appropriate for the job the machine is re-tasked for. Those stickers are there to remind operators about safety for the current job. I used to have similar stickers made up and put on a machine when done. It never meant the guarding was to stay permanently in that particular configuration.

                        OSHA regs aren't that overly difficult or onerous to deal with, it's mostly common sense. Over the years I've probably done 30 or 40 punch press rebuilds for a very large manufacturer. OHSA compliance was never a problem. Local plant safety committees were more a pain in the backside for me.

                        That's was a steal on the Perkins. Those are fine machines.

                        dalee
                        If you think you understand what is going on, you haven't been paying attention.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Fishing lures......why didn't I think of that! I have made a few....

                          Here is one I built for a friend. I failed to take a finished pic.




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                          • #14
                            I can't even think about how many hundreds of dies I built and put into small Acme-Danneman die sets and then ran in 3 to 15 ton Perkins and Benchmaster presses. I did that for 9 years back in the 70s and early 80s for a company that is still in business and still sells American made stampings to companies all over the Far East. A company started by a refugee from the Warsaw Ghetto and is now worth 150 million. Our biggest press was 30 tons. My apprentice is still there and is now a VP of Mfg.
                            Anyway... If I had that little press I could think of tons of ways to supplement my up-coming retirement not the least of which might be some whacky guitar picks.
                            That being said, Im too far away to help take it off you hands but wish you the best of luck.

                            PS -High Country...Watch out with that hex wrench set. I had the plastic handle on the 1/4 wrench bust and lacerate the palm of my hand someting fierce. It's a 90 deg. wrench in a plastic tee. Nice shop too!


                            Tim.
                            Illigitimi non Carborundum 😎
                            9X49 Birmingham Mill, Reid Model 2C Grinder, 13x40 ENCO GH Lathe, 6X18 Craftsman lathe, Sherline CNC mill, Eastwood TIG200 AC/DC and lots of stuff from 30+ years in the trade and 15.5 in refinery unit operations. Now retired. El Paso, TX

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                            • #15
                              Thanks for the heads up. That was earlier in my shops life....its evolving nicely. 36x48 16' walls and 12' lean to's for a 48x60 foot print. I like everything except heating it....lol.

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