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  • Using up every last bit of scrap

    My 3/8" black Delrin rod was down to the last inch but I decided to try to get one last part out of it.
    I got it straight in the chuck by offering it up chucked in the tail stock.

    Barely hanging on


    Machining complete on one end


    Finished part


    It never moved during turning, drilling through, and counterboring in spite of the fact that it's a slippery material.
    That's a #8-32 screw for scale.
    Last edited by MotorradMike; 05-15-2012, 01:13 PM.
    Mike

    My Dad always said, "If you want people to do things for you on the farm, you have to buy a machine they can sit on that does most of the work."

  • #2
    "by offering it up chucked in the tail stock."

    what do you mean by that?

    besides, weird delrin, how come its black?

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    • #3
      Delrin is available neutral or black, check McMaster Carr, they have lots of it. We always buy black for prototype parts. Bob.

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      • #4
        I believe to get it chucked straight(ish), he first put it in the tailstock drill chuck, then tightened down the headstock chuck. It's a handy trick when you're using the last little bit of something, or if you're working with a pocketbook hurting material and want as little waste as possible.

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        • #5
          Sometimes I've done similar "savings", but turned it between centers as the part would have a hole through it anyway
          Amount of experience is in direct proportion to the value of broken equipment.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by dian
            "by offering it up chucked in the tail stock."

            what do you mean by that?

            besides, weird delrin, how come its black?
            It comes dyed many colours, I prefer black but the local supplier seems to have only natural.
            Mike

            My Dad always said, "If you want people to do things for you on the farm, you have to buy a machine they can sit on that does most of the work."

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Jaakko Fagerlund
              Sometimes I've done similar "savings", but turned it between centers as the part would have a hole through it anyway
              You probably have a 'real' lathe.
              There's no room for me to get the cutter in if I've got the tail stock in close.
              Mike

              My Dad always said, "If you want people to do things for you on the farm, you have to buy a machine they can sit on that does most of the work."

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by achtanelion
                I believe to get it chucked straight(ish), he first put it in the tailstock drill chuck, then tightened down the headstock chuck. It's a handy trick when you're using the last little bit of something, or if you're working with a pocketbook hurting material and want as little waste as possible.
                Yes, that's what I did.
                I invented the technique but decided not to make a big deal of it, you guys can use it if you like, just don't share it with those PM guys.
                Mike

                My Dad always said, "If you want people to do things for you on the farm, you have to buy a machine they can sit on that does most of the work."

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by MotorradMike
                  You probably have a 'real' lathe.
                  There's no room for me to get the cutter in if I've got the tail stock in close.
                  Done that with a SIEG SC4 and at work with two big machines. Just needs the tool extended a little bit further out for small diameters and a narrow nosed center.
                  Amount of experience is in direct proportion to the value of broken equipment.

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                  • #10
                    Just curious but wouldn't delrin make decent supports for a steady rest? As a replacement for the brass/bronze fingers? Thanks, Frank

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Frank46
                      Just curious but wouldn't delrin make decent supports for a steady rest? As a replacement for the brass/bronze fingers? Thanks, Frank
                      I don't think they would take the heat and friction for very long
                      --
                      Tom C
                      ... nice weather eh?

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Frank46
                        Just curious but wouldn't delrin make decent supports for a steady rest? As a replacement for the brass/bronze fingers? Thanks, Frank
                        Friction will soon melt them down and anything not-ground will eat them up pretty soon and badly.

                        But for some sensitive/delicate/light work and with a lubricant they might work.
                        Amount of experience is in direct proportion to the value of broken equipment.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Frank46
                          Just curious but wouldn't delrin make decent supports for a steady rest? As a replacement for the brass/bronze fingers? Thanks, Frank
                          I have a travelling steady that was supplied with my c1907 Drummond lathe which had wooden inserts instead of fingers.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by The Artful Bodger
                            I have a travelling steady that was supplied with my c1907 Drummond lathe which had wooden inserts instead of fingers.
                            Wooden? I hope that were either Ebony or Lignum Vitae. :-)
                            ...Lew...

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Lew Hartswick
                              Wooden? I hope that were either Ebony or Lignum Vitae. :-)
                              ...Lew...

                              I think it was a block of whatever was available. Presumably one was expected to mount a block in the holder (two blocks actually) and drill a hole through to match the diameter of the work. No doubt it worked quite well.

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