Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

A trick for your 4x6..... bandsaw that is

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • A trick for your 4x6..... bandsaw that is

    I needed to cut a 3" by 3" square piece of steel in half. I could have cut it in the verticle mode but it was 1" thick. That would not be fun and I probably would not get a straight cut.

    What I did was tack weld it to a piece of 1" square tubing. The vise clamped on the tubing and the piece cut just fine.

  • #2
    I do that all the time with shorts...even 4" dia solid rounds. All I waste is tha last 1/4" or so...usually the welded area is too hard to machine anyway. You can make all kinds of weird cuts doing this. Another thing I do (was mentioned on a board somewhere) is clamp my POS old drill press vise in the saw vise. Use this for splitting bushings etc.
    I have tools I don't even know I own...

    Comment


    • #3
      I made this to hold small work

      http://img4.photobucket.com/albums/0...z/00001049.jpg

      Comment


      • #4
        dvk,
        Nicely done.
        To invent, you need a good imagination - and a pile of junk. Thomas A. Edison

        Comment


        • #5
          dvk...I agree..looks good! I see you have used the KISS principal through out!
          I have tools I don't even know I own...

          Comment


          • #6
            That is nice dvk. I may build one myself.

            Comment


            • #7
              My solution to a simular problem was to cut a piece of 3x3x3/8 angle to a length of four inches, then put it in the saw vise with one of the faces of the angle toward the blade. The thin piece is then clamped to the face of the angle (with the blade inside the clamp), adjusted for position, the vise is tightened on the piece of angle, and cutting commences.

              Comment


              • #8
                DVK

                Do you have a photo of this device in use?

                Comment


                • #9
                  Heres a few pics top and bottom how it was made.
                  http://img4.photobucket.com/albums/0...z/00001047.jpg

                  http://img4.photobucket.com/albums/0...z/00001060.jpg

                  pics of it in use.

                  http://img4.photobucket.com/albums/0...z/00001063.jpg

                  http://img4.photobucket.com/albums/0...z/00001065.jpg

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    dvk,
                    That is just the kind of thing that Neil likes for publishing in the magazines. Why not write a description of how to make it (or better still make another one photographing each stage of construction) and send it in? I think that there would be a lot of interest in it.
                    To invent, you need a good imagination - and a pile of junk. Thomas A. Edison

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I agree. That's just the kind of article that'll keep me subcribing to my favorite rag. It's simple(for a simpleton like me). It could be written up in one issue. And it's something I need.
                      I expect to see an article on the making of this fixture. I want one.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Thank you very much.
                        Gene

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Nice fixture dvk, I'm going to make one for my saw. Did you use aluminum? Thanks for sharing!
                          Michael

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Thanks every one for the compliments.

                            I'm in the middle of a project right now so I really don't have much time to sit down and give a good explanation but maybe later I'll draw up some cad drawings and a better description.

                            Heres a little discription of how I made it.

                            I took a piece of 3" by 1/2" aluminum bar stock and cut it to a 4" long piece.

                            I then machined half of the length down to a depth of about 200 thous. leaving an edge at the very left of it to keep the saw blade from pushing the workpiece away from it. Then in the middle I machined a slot a little over 1/4" wide to accomodate a 1/4 -20 all thread. At the very bottom of the jig I machined a larger slot about 1/8" or so deep and about 5/8 wide to recess a nut that gets glued on to the bottom of the all thread to hold it in position to clamp against, the nut I faced on the lathe down to a little less than an 1/8 th inch so the whole nut an all thread can slide in the groove with the nut recesseds under neath, than I use strap clamps to clamp the work pieces.

                            I hope this helps some..

                            Comment

                            Working...
                            X