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Dyno-testing disasters car tuning gone wrong

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  • Dyno-testing disasters car tuning gone wrong

    Oh theh humanitah

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OzFGU...endscreen&NR=1
    I just need one more tool,just one!

  • #2
    Thanks for posting. Hopefully some of these videos will keep those with little experience/intelligence from tempting fate being near a spinning dyno.

    Quite often I have to help our test engineers run the dyno/instrumentation to test the engines I design for a living. I used to love being in the cell itself while things were running, until a few digital safety measures failed, the engine I was working on oversped, several pistons contacted injectors and "ejected" them at me in <3 seconds. Luckily I was unhurt (missed) but the lesson stuck and I hide in the control room unless absolutely necessary now.
    "I am, and ever will be, a white-socks, pocket-protector, nerdy engineer -- born under the second law of thermodynamics, steeped in the steam tables, in love with free-body diagrams, transformed by Laplace, and propelled by compressible flow."

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    • #3
      i always wondered why in the states you use the type of dynos as pictured. i never acually saw one like that. here we have the ones with two rollers, they automatcally allign the car, no need to strap it down. are they much more expensive?

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      • #4
        Single rollers allow a larger roller, which in turn means a better (larger) contact patch to the tire.

        And *all* chassis dynos, including twin-roller, require the car to be strapped down. Not just for safety, but the idea is that it's a dynamometer- there's a brake acting against the roller(s)- they're not just free spinning- so without some form of restraint, the car can- and will- roll away.

        A low-powered car might get away with a parking brake or wheel chocks, but any kind of powerful or modified car *must* have restraints.

        Doc.
        Doc's Machine. (Probably not what you expect.)

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        • #5
          Originally posted by justanengineer
          Thanks for posting. Hopefully some of these videos will keep those with little experience/intelligence from tempting fate being near a spinning dyno.

          Quite often I have to help our test engineers run the dyno/instrumentation to test the engines I design for a living. I used to love being in the cell itself while things were running, until a few digital safety measures failed, the engine I was working on oversped, several pistons contacted injectors and "ejected" them at me in <3 seconds. Luckily I was unhurt (missed) but the lesson stuck and I hide in the control room unless absolutely necessary now.

          Yeah I always cringe when I see people standing close to a car running on the dyno or those guys that feel the need to stand over the motor while pulling.

          I've heard plenty of stories of parts getting stuck in the lexan windows of dyno rooms.

          Some of these videos also show the dyno owner themselves doing some of the dumbest things. No straps, straps to the rear door latches (LOL) its sad.
          Andy

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          • #6
            My brother worked for an IH truck dealership right about the time they became Navastar.One of their mechanics was running up a Freightliner conventional on the dyno,he had put the safety chain on the rear cross member,but forgot the frame chains.

            The tires glazed over and then broke down and hooked up causing it to hop a couple times at which point it straightened out the hook on the safety and the truck left the building,literally.It went out through the parking lot,through the fence,across a ditch,into the parking lot of the supermarket next door and started wadding up cars in front of it.The side of the supermarket building finally stopped it.Luckily nobody was hurt,but the damage was impressive.

            The mechanic just loaded his tools up and ten minutes later was never seen again.
            Last edited by wierdscience; 05-18-2012, 09:48 AM.
            I just need one more tool,just one!

            Comment


            • #7
              ^ were the brakes not working?
              Andy

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              • #8
                Originally posted by vpt
                ^ were the brakes not working?
                Nobody in the cab,he got bucked out the door when it hopped.Truck only went a few hundred feet,still managed about six totaled cars and some busted blocks in the side of the supermarket.Lots of mass spun up in a truck doing 70mph.
                I just need one more tool,just one!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by justanengineer
                  Thanks for posting. Hopefully some of these videos will keep those with little experience/intelligence from tempting fate being near a spinning dyno.

                  Quite often I have to help our test engineers run the dyno/instrumentation to test the engines I design for a living. I used to love being in the cell itself while things were running, until a few digital safety measures failed, the engine I was working on oversped, several pistons contacted injectors and "ejected" them at me in <3 seconds. Luckily I was unhurt (missed) but the lesson stuck and I hide in the control room unless absolutely necessary now.
                  I was in a dyno cell years ago and experienced the same thing and could not agree more!
                  Lots of dirty laundry for me that day.
                  When the sh*t hits the fan you can't run fast or far enough!!

                  Here's a classic example of what it's like when a large V-8 diesel grenades under load.

                  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pDwqPaQjjLY
                  Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
                  Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I had one of my bikes on the dyno and they strapped down with really pathetic luggage straps. Happily all it did was snap the straps and spin the tyre on the roller when the boost came in. Ditto for when they repeated with a guy on the pillion.
                    Then they committed the cardinal sin of turning it off at high rpm after the run instead of letting the heat come out the hot turbo first and gave me a ticket claiming it had 92hp and charged me for the privilege as "the run was good". I was suffering wheelspin at 120mph in the dry and was running 16psi of boost with it in a 750cc engine, and they told me I had 92hp with a straight face.

                    I'm in the planning stages of building my own in my barn after that experience to set my dragbike up on. I have a oldie but good 750Kw (1000hp) heenan and froud dpy water brake, and a drum and drum shaft setup from a road roller so far. Guess I better plan in some remote means to control the subject under power too, in addition to the extractors and soundproofing!

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                    • #11
                      well, i havent seen a car strapped down on the dyno yet. when i was installing motecs, i just drove onto the dyno, got the ticket and drove off to do some more tuning. obviously two rollers have more contact than one. we also dont mess with engine hp and hp at the wheel we have din (en) hp and its clear what it is.

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                      • #12
                        Is anybody able to tell me why a video camera was "conveniently" running in each one of these events. To me, it seems as though someone with too much time and money was deliberately trying to collect on their warranties.

                        Orrin
                        So many projects. So little time.

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                        • #13
                          Seemed to me anyway,, there were too many guys wandering around some of those videos, no wonder people get hurt,, like the guy that tripped , fell flat on his face,, man,, that must have broke his nose!!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Orrin
                            Is anybody able to tell me why a video camera was "conveniently" running in each one of these events. To me, it seems as though someone with too much time and money was deliberately trying to collect on their warranties.
                            In better test cells, the operators/test engineers monitor the engine visually via video cameras in addition to using other instrumentation and the shatterproof window.

                            In a "for hire" shop with a dyno installed in an open bay, I would suspect making it an "event" is half the draw. Even amongst serious auto hobbyists, most tend not to pay for dyno time with any regularity, so video cameras are to be expected. The same thing applies to power numbers that are bigger than the engine, theyre good for business.
                            "I am, and ever will be, a white-socks, pocket-protector, nerdy engineer -- born under the second law of thermodynamics, steeped in the steam tables, in love with free-body diagrams, transformed by Laplace, and propelled by compressible flow."

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by justanengineer
                              In better test cells, the operators/test engineers monitor the engine visually via video cameras in addition to using other instrumentation and the shatterproof window.

                              In a "for hire" shop with a dyno installed in an open bay, I would suspect making it an "event" is half the draw. Even amongst serious auto hobbyists, most tend not to pay for dyno time with any regularity, so video cameras are to be expected. The same thing applies to power numbers that are bigger than the engine, theyre good for business.
                              Ditto.

                              Plus like justanengineer said it is indeed an event.
                              Buddy has just spent $2,000-$40,000 dollars for more ponies and he wants the footage captured for posterity of the car/motor actually pulling the big number.
                              Between the cubic dollars invested into the power-train and the dyno time, yeah it's a special moment that most would like a record of.

                              Accidents are preventable by strict adherence to safety guidelines. Most of the mishaps shown are the results of dyno operators not following safe operational procedures.

                              Engine blowups. Well that's racin.

                              For those that play in this very expensive arena there are no warranties, just pick up the pieces and learn from your mistakes. As you can see the learning curve can be a steep one.
                              Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
                              Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

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