Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Need dividing plates for rotary table

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Need dividing plates for rotary table

    When I purchased my mill I got a nice 6" Horiz/Vert rotary table. It is made or sold by Ralmike. I would like to find some dividing plates or the kit to fit this old table.
    The small shaft that the handle fits is 9/16" and the other wider area inside is 1 1/8". Can I just order a dividing plate kit from like a Phase II, Enco
    or some other model and get it to fit this table? Or is it too old to fit up with something?





    I sure would be nice to extend this rotary tables capability with the addition of dividing plates

    Regards

    Skipd1

  • #2
    John Stevenson who is a member here builds and sells dividing plates. Any of his work would be top notch. You might need to provide a few measurements and build a plunger and a dividing quadrant. I can't tell for sure from your pictures, But it looks like your flange that the hand wheel butts up against isn't drilled and tapped yet for fastening the dividing plates to. If not, You'd need to do that so it fits the pitch circle of the bolt holes on the plates.

    Maybe one of the accessorie dividing plate setups could also work with your table?

    Pete

    Comment


    • #3
      Just to show what's needed when installing a new dividing plate assembly on a 6" "Vertex" rotary table. They are very similar to those for a "Phase 2" I believe.

      https://www.machineryhouse.com.au/R016

      I can't say if they will fit the OP's rotary table but it should not be hard to modify them to suit.

      The prices are Australian $ which is pretty close to parity with the US $.

      US prices seem to be about 50>60% of Australian prices.

      I notice that you hand-wheel is calibrated at 5 minute intervals and has no vernier.

      If you were to make you own plate manually (without CNC etc.) it is a long process prone to error as it has to be done with a digital calculator (hand or web) and the answers will be in decimal degrees which have to be converted to degrees:minutes:seconds format for use with the handwheel.

      For example: 27 holes on the "B" plate:

      1 = 360/27 = 13.3333 degrees = 13d.20".00""

      2 = 360/27 x 2 = 26.666666 degrees = 26d:40':00"

      etc.

      If it were me I'd ask here for the detail of the plates and sector arms etc. for a 6" "Vertex" rotary table and see what is involved.

      Comment


      • #4
        Speaking as someone who uses dividing plates on a rotary table quite a bit, you would be much better off going for a CNC approach like the Divisionmaster. Doing lots of indexing with dividing plates tends to be boring and with that comes errors. The parts that you want to index always seem to be the ones that you have invested the most hours in, so you could regard dividing plates as the best way to guarantee raised blood pressure and foul language.

        If you are really stuck on dividing plates, then I agree that seeing what JS can offer would be a good move.
        Bill

        Comment


        • #5
          When I got my mill it came with a 6" Vertex R/T. Bought a set of plates/sector arm etc. for a no-name R/T and did some work to fit the parts. It was not difficult. It helped that I was able to see the item on display and verify that I could indeed do the job.

          I would say "go for it".

          Geoff

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by oldtiffie
            Just to show <snip>.....

            If you were to make you own plate manually (without CNC etc.) it is a long process prone to error as it has to be done with a digital calculator (hand or web) and the answers will be in decimal degrees which have to be converted to degrees:minutes:seconds format for use with the handwheel.

            For example: 27 holes on the "B" plate:

            1 = 360/27 = 13.3333 degrees = 13d.20".00""

            2 = 360/27 x 2 = 26.666666 degrees = 26d:40':00"

            etc.

            ...<snip>.
            Yes, you can make your own plates. The process may be a bit long, but you do not have to use even one bit of math or calculation, either manual or with a calculator. I have explained this before, several times. Here is a reference to one of them. Look down to post #11 in this thread.

            http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/sho...dividing+plate

            The plates that you make using this procedure will be just as accurate as your RT or indexer, which you use to make them.
            Last edited by Paul Alciatore; 05-27-2012, 10:26 AM.
            Paul A.

            Make it fit.
            You can't win and there is a penalty for trying!

            Comment


            • #7
              One question that has not been asked regarding "standard (ie "Vertex") plates - me included - is to ask the OP what the worm to wheel ration is. Those "Vertex" type plates are made for a 90:1 ratio.

              If the OP's RT is other than 90:1 he may have to consider working out the hole circles for each number he wants to cut and make the plates either by hand or get it done professionally.

              I quite often work out the hole etc. spacing in decimal degrees and set it on my vernier. I can make a table of decimal>d:m:s if I want and use both though its surprising how many hole spacings are fractions of 360 (ie full degrees) and its easy to use the scale of the combination of the"rough" scale on the side of the table and the vernier on the hand-wheel. The vernier on a "Vertex: 6" RT is calibrated to 20 arc seconds which is 1/180 of a degree which is ~.000097 which is near enough to 1:10313 or about 1 tenth per inch.

              The obvious solution - in the absence of having the plate holes drilled by CNC - is to use a "Divisionmaster" - if you have access to that too - which fits on a 6" "Vertex" rotary table - as suggested by wilmac at:
              http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/sho...29&postcount=4

              Comment


              • #8
                I just make whatever hole plates I need as I need them. I used to print them out from CAD and just center-punch and drill but now I have a DRO I can just drill them direct on my mill. I only use small plates of cast iron that allows for three or four rings of holes but since I'll never use many combinations I don't find it a problem.
                Peter - novice home machinist, modern motorcycle enthusiast.

                Denford Viceroy 280 Synchro (11 x 24)
                Herbert 0V adapted to R8 by 'Sir John'.
                Monarch 10EE 1942

                Comment


                • #9
                  I you're MADE of patience and have a DRO on your mill, you can work out hole circle coordinate in a spreadsheet, and drill them with an endmill ground as a drill. Your probable location error will be about 0.0020 CEP which translates into and indexing error of - I dunno, teeny. It depends on the radius of the hole circle, the ratio of the table etc.

                  Anyway the table indexing error component drivne by the probable hole circle location error is most likely swamper by aggregate errors in the worm and gear trive of the table. Center punching from a CAD overlay is probable as acurate as you need. But I'd prickpunch first to get a mark that would locate a center punch for easier drill starting.
                  Last edited by Forrest Addy; 05-27-2012, 09:02 PM.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Peter.
                    I just make whatever hole plates I need as I need them. I used to print them out from CAD and just center-punch and drill but now I have a DRO I can just drill them direct on my mill. I only use small plates of cast iron that allows for three or four rings of holes but since I'll never use many combinations I don't find it a problem.
                    +1

                    Assuming the OP does not have DRO's on his mill, this may well be the most realistic way to go - to get started anyway - assuming the OP can get them drawn and plotted in CAD.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by willmac
                      Speaking as someone who uses dividing plates on a rotary table quite a bit, you would be much better off going for a CNC approach like the Divisionmaster. Doing lots of indexing with dividing plates tends to be boring and with that comes errors. The parts that you want to index always seem to be the ones that you have invested the most hours in, so you could regard dividing plates as the best way to guarantee raised blood pressure and foul language.

                      If you are really stuck on dividing plates, then I agree that seeing what JS can offer would be a good move.
                      +1 the DivisionMaster which Forrest Addy endorses as well.

                      If you have a really good drill you may not need a mill - just clamp the DM to the drill table, set the off-set for the PCD radius, set the DM for the number of holes and voila - done.

                      It might be best to mark out any pitch circles (but not the holes) for set-up guidance - but it would work.

                      A centre-punched CAD print-out should work as well.

                      If the OP were to make the plate/s he need only drill as many circles as he thinks he needs as Peter suggests:

                      Originally posted by Peter
                      I just make whatever hole plates I need as I need them. I used to print them out from CAD and just center-punch and drill but now I have a DRO I can just drill them direct on my mill. I only use small plates of cast iron that allows for three or four rings of holes but since I'll never use many combinations I don't find it a problem.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        bolt hole circle calculator

                        Here is a link to a calculator for using X/Y coordinates to generate bolt circles.
                        Hope this is helpful to you.

                        http://doov.com/cgi-bin/bolthole.cgi

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          It is possible to remachine or remake the part the plates are fitted to so if you find a plate set that is close to what you need you're just a quick turn away from having the proper fitment.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            FWIW, I have a Ralmike 6" table ( actually a Yuasa, rebranded) It is similar to yours, but is slightly different.. I bought the Vertex kit and it fit perfectly.
                            I bought it from a US tool supplier, but can't remember the name.


                            Kit: https://www.machineryhouse.com.au/R016

                            RWO

                            Comment

                            Working...
                            X