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Brought my KT 2D Mill Home ... Still on Trailer

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  • Brought my KT 2D Mill Home ... Still on Trailer

    Well, now I just need to figure out how to get my 2D off the trailer and into the basement through the garage. I'm thinking I'll jack it up with handyman jacks and roll it on pipe. I ran into a significant problem, though. I never thought to measure the height of the mill ... I have to remove the door frame seperating the garage from the basement in order to get the mill in.

    A more serious problem is when the mill is in the basement. I have about 90" of height before I hit the joists. The mill is about 82" tall but to change speeds, the top of the mill swings open to reveal the variable speed drive and the cranks. (One to change ranges and the other to operate the sheaves). I won't be able to swing the top all the way open when it's in the basement... not sure what to do

  • #2
    I assume because of floor joist. If so you can brace it then frame in a square above the mill with LVL then remove the bracing . Will 1 cut joist give you enough room?
    "Let me recommend the best medicine in the
    world: a long journey, at a mild season, through a pleasant
    country, in easy stages."
    ~ James Madison

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    • #3
      Originally posted by flylo
      I assume because of floor joist. If so you can brace it then frame in a square above the mill with LVL then remove the bracing . Will 1 cut joist give you enough room?

      I'm not sure yet. The mill is under a tarp so I can't get an accurate measurement, but it the top of the mill is large. I'm worried that it won't fit even after boxing out a section of the floor joists. Will have to update once I make some more progress, I guess. I saw the tunnel digging thread ... maybe I need to start digging my basement deeper

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Fasttrack
        I saw the tunnel digging thread ... maybe I need to start digging my basement deeper
        Just cut a hole in the floor, I'm sure your wife won't mind.

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        • #5
          Is the top you speak of just a cover? If so just remove the cover?

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          • #6
            I would lower the basement floor below (concrete?) before even considering cutting floor joists above. Cutting the concrete can be "undone" with a bit of fresh concrete and a bit of epoxy paint before selling. Cutting the floor joists cant be hidden, and many potential buyers wont trust your work even if you do.
            "I am, and ever will be, a white-socks, pocket-protector, nerdy engineer -- born under the second law of thermodynamics, steeped in the steam tables, in love with free-body diagrams, transformed by Laplace, and propelled by compressible flow."

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            • #7
              Take the mill apart. You are going to want to inspect it thoroughly anyway. Nothing like reassembly to get to know your machine.
              John M...your (un)usual basement dweller

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Deja Vu
                Take the mill apart. You are going to want to inspect it thoroughly anyway. Nothing like reassembly to get to know your machine.
                I've owned and used this machine for several years now, just relocating it

                Originally posted by justanengineer
                I would lower the basement floor below (concrete?) before even considering cutting floor joists above. Cutting the concrete can be "undone" with a bit of fresh concrete and a bit of epoxy paint before selling. Cutting the floor joists cant be hidden, and many potential buyers wont trust your work even if you do.
                Hmm ... Turns out my basement floor is 6" with welded 1/2" rebar on a 2' grid. The builder and previous owner owned an excavation buisness and had the contract for the State highways when they were first built and built cisterns, septic tanks etc. He pulled out all the stops on the basement.

                Sasquatch - it is just a cover but removal is not super easy. The cover ranges between 1/4" and 1/2" thick cast iron and has a beautiful curve.

                This is a picture from when I first bought it:


                The little yellow handle you see at the top is the latch for the cover. The larger yellow and chrome handle near the top engages the rotary head auto feed. I guess taking the cover would be the easiest solution. Wouldn't be noticeable snugged up near the ceiling anyway...
                Last edited by Fasttrack; 05-29-2012, 11:06 PM.

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                • #9
                  Re: Justanengineers post:

                  I'm surprised an engineer would not consider cutting the floor joists and reinforcing that area with steel "flitch plates" to carry the load.

                  (this of course would be done after a considerable study of the forces of domestic vibrations.)

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                  • #10
                    Fastrack,, Nice MILL !! Yup the curve MUST remain, very nice!!

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                    • #11
                      How about a VFD for speed changes?

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                      • #12
                        It just won't fit. Leave it on the trailer PM your address & I'll come get it. Problem solved!
                        "Let me recommend the best medicine in the
                        world: a long journey, at a mild season, through a pleasant
                        country, in easy stages."
                        ~ James Madison

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by justanengineer
                          I would lower the basement floor below (concrete?) before even considering cutting floor joists above. Cutting the concrete can be "undone" with a bit of fresh concrete and a bit of epoxy paint before selling. Cutting the floor joists cant be hidden, and many potential buyers wont trust your work even if you do.
                          It's done everday for stairways,etc. There's no roof load & taking out a 4'pc of joist & framing it with LVL or flitch beam while doubling the decking from underneath is fine as long as it's not under a bearing wall & the closer to the center of the house the better. Thats why floor trusses have they're heat chases in the center of the truss.
                          "Let me recommend the best medicine in the
                          world: a long journey, at a mild season, through a pleasant
                          country, in easy stages."
                          ~ James Madison

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            re: Cutting joists:

                            Check your'e building code book to see how much weight a "Flitch" plate beam will hold.
                            You may be surprised.

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                            • #15
                              build a large, permanent coffee table in in the living room to hide the hole

                              seriously though, boxing and fitting the machine between two joists is an option or making a pit. guys with concrete saws would make a mess but get the hole made in no time, you excavate and re pour

                              then again if the cover doesn't affect operations that sounds easiest

                              walkout....or is that coming down the stairs
                              .

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