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Learned More on Paper about Tungsten Disulphide

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  • #16
    Originally posted by dian
    so, i mixed it with alcohol, rubbed it onto a polished shaft. after it dried, it came off, it scratched the shaft.
    The fact that it is scratching the surface of metal is pretty troubling--and may have led to its poor performance on the slide test? Could the Tungsten DiSulphide have been contaminated somehow? Anybody else that has used tungsten disulphide noticed any roughening of surfaces during/after application?

    I was hoping that Tungsten DiSulphide was going to be the oil additive or dry lube, now I am not so sure.

    Cheers!

    Low-Alloy

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Low-alloy
      I was hoping that Tungsten DiSulphide was going to be the oil additive or dry lube, now I am not so sure.
      When someone first posted about WS2 a couple of weeks ago, I did some idle reading, and apparently the issue with Tungsten disulfide being an oil additive is that it's so dense that it's nearly impossible to keep it in suspension.

      As far as scratching the parent material, I think the general usage model is like lapping abrasive: the harder Tungsten disulfide crystals are supposed to embed in the softer parent material, and act like ball bearings.
      "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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      • #18
        Originally posted by lazlo
        .......and apparently the issue with Tungsten disulfide being an oil additive is that it's so dense that it's nearly impossible to keep it in suspension.
        With larger particles, yes- but that's 'permently suspended'.
        If they do tend to settle, usually the agitation of the fluid within the motor or gearbox generally spins them up back into circulation.

        Guy on my motorcycle forum who's an engineering geek did some experiments with particle size and settling over time.
        He used an industrial Vitamix blender to suspend very small particle ws2 powder.
        He had different blending times and observed the setting amount over time with clear bottles.

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        • #19
          From what I've read, WS2 properly applied in a thin layer forms a van der waals bond with the surface and is there forever. You don't want any more WS2 on your surface than is necessary to do this which means rub or blast on and remove the excess. It also likely means that you have to disperse it to a great extent as clumps of the stuff will probably have more tendency to bind to each other than the surface.

          A suspension of something this dense would undoubtedly settle so in order to get a stable colloid of it, you need to have a very small particle size.

          Based on the van der wall force adhesion I'm fairly sure the more is better adage doesn't apply. My predicted usage method would be to mix at very high shear with alcohol and then rub it on. Other van der wall force related work I've done suggests that there is probably an optimal amount of it in the solution you want to use. The question for me now is really how high a shear do you have to mix it under before the tiny particles go around coating things nicely.

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