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Learned More on Paper about Tungsten Disulphide

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  • ckelloug
    replied
    Lynn, Thanks for pointing out the confusion.

    I was trying to clarify the apparent troubles using WS2 cited by the gentleman who was trying to make a moglice replacement and found WS2 to be more sticky than slippery.

    I am in LA right now and I was nominally trying to lubricate the column in a CH Products flight yoke so that the PC based flight simulator we have at Harvey Mudd College will work better. I was curious to try WS2 since it is dry and said to be permanent. I looked for LA suppliers of WS2 and found Dicronite:

    Dicronite http://www.dicronite.com/ is a company that will treat parts with WS2 but won't sell the WS2. They talk a lot about wanting licensees for their process.

    My point in bringing this up was that it appears that successfully using WS2 may be a bit harder than dusting the surface you want to be slippery with the stuff. I brought up something very slippery which is also apparently hard to use. . .

    Leave a comment:


  • lynnl
    replied
    Originally posted by ckelloug
    .......
    Dicronite won't even sell WS2 lubricant, they will either apply it for you or license the process.

    --Cameron
    Cameron, I'm a little confused by that statement. That link in lazlo's posting presents an option to buy it. ...1 lb bag for $54.

    Is the "Dicronite" you mention a different supplier?

    Leave a comment:


  • lazlo
    replied
    Interesting -- that's not entirely consistent with the web page cited on the other thread. At least, the "blasting" on the lowerfriction.com site consists of 120 psi, which is spraying it out
    of a sandblaster nozzle:

    http://www.lowerfriction.com/product...p?categoryID=1

    Two established ways the WS2 powder can be used are:

    1) Mixing the WS2 powder with wet lubricants (such as oil, grease & other synthetic lubricants):
    The powder can be mixed 1wt% to 15wt% (as required) with grease or oil. This will enhance lubricity of the mixture and also improves High Temperature and Extreme Pressure properties of mixture. During the use, WS2 in the mixture will get coated on mating/moving parts, which in turn reduces friction and improves lubricity and load bearing ability for much longer cycles.

    2) Coating the WS2 powder on a substrate requiring (dry) lubricity:
    The powder can be coated by spraying (at 120 psi) the substrate with dry (& cool) pneumatic air. It does not require any binders and spraying can be done at normal room temperature. Coated film will be 0.5 micron thick. In an alternative application method, the powder can also be mixed with Isopropyl alcohol and this paste could be buffed to the substrate. The coating applications are already established in many areas such as Automotive parts, Racing Car Engine and other parts, Aerospace parts, Bearings (Linear, Ball, Roller etc), Shafts, Marine parts, Cutting Tools, Blades, Slitters, Knives, Mold release, Precision Gears, Valve components, Pistons, Chains, Machinery components and many other areas.

    Leave a comment:


  • ckelloug
    started a topic Learned More on Paper about Tungsten Disulphide

    Learned More on Paper about Tungsten Disulphide

    Since I brought up the Tungsten Disulphide a while back, I figured I'd share what I learned.

    After doing some more research about Tungsten Disulphide, it appears that it has to either be blasted onto or lapped into the surface to work. The stuff came from NASA and the aerospace companies say you get near permanent lubrication with a .5 micron layer thickness. Apparently, it forms a pretty good bond with the surface once it gets on there.

    While I was researching, I found some of the aerospace companies in LA that use the stuff. Dicronite won't even sell WS2 lubricant, they will either apply it for you or license the process.

    --Cameron
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