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Did Chevrolet ever make a slant six engine?

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  • Did Chevrolet ever make a slant six engine?

    One of the guys in the welding class was talking about having a early-'70s Nova with a 292ci slant six engine.

    I've never seen or heard of this engine, and I can't find anything about it by googling. Everything with slant six ends up being Chrysler, Pontiac, or BMW.

    Does Chevy slant six really exist? Anybody got a link to a picture of one?
    Any products mentioned in my posts have been endorsed by their manufacturer.

  • #2
    His information is wrong. Firstly the early 70,s nova would have come with a 230 Cu. Inch inline 6. The next was a 250 cu. inch, the only difference was a bit longer stroke. The big 292 engine had the same 3 7/8 bore as the other two, but had an almost 4inch stroke, requiring that the block was way deeper than the other two. (these were truck engines.)

    Earlier back before the 230 first came out they had a 194 cu. inch and of course the little "Iron Duke" as they were called,, a 153 Cu. inch 4 cyl.

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    • #3
      No. The engine was not slanted in the engine bay. But they did come with a STRAIGHT six.
      "The truth is incontrovertible, malice may attack it, ignorance may deride it, but in the end; there it is." Winston Churchill

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      • #4
        Chrysler was the manufacturer of the slant six in 170, 198 and 225 cubic inches. Great engines that ran almost forever.

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        • #5
          Dodge, Plymouth, Chrysler
          I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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          • #6
            (Haybines and square balers too!!!!!!!!! )

            Great engines!!

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            • #7
              Known as the "Leaning Tower of Power"

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              • #8
                Chrysler actually came out with a "Hi-Po" kit for these 225 engines at one time, i believe it was a different camshaft, fourbarrel, and dual point dist. plate.

                aww yes the distributor,, one of the stupidest set ups to work on down between the engine and the inner fender.

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                • #9
                  "...One of the guys in the welding class was talking about having a early-'70s Nova with a 292ci slant six engine."

                  probably related to the media "expert" who saw an "AK-16 semi automatic machinegun"

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                  • #10
                    A guy I work with has several times mentioned the 1960 Ford Falcon he owned way back when. He refers to it as having a slant six. Not much point in correcting him, I know what he meant.

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                    • #11
                      No "slant six" from General Motors. Chrysler Corp is the only one.

                      Interesting note on "how it got that way"....

                      In the late 1950's, Chrysler did a "redesign" of their Dodge Dart, Plymouth Valiant, models. The prototype was lower and wider than previous Chrysler platforms. They wanted to use the ridiculously reliable, low powered, three-main-bearing side-valve (flathead) six that they had been using for too many years to be proud of. It fit, but barely, under the new, sleeker models hood. But the power wasn't there. Chrysler engineers decided to "modernize" the old boat-anchor with an overhead valve cylinder head. The head produced the gain in horsepower they were looking for, but....it was too tall for the body it was supposed to go into.. The solution came when the engineering staff leaned the engine over 30° to the right of the vehicle centerline. To keep the carburetor, and air filter low, they devised a long runner intake manifold, which, quite by accident, improved the power and low-end torque even more. The fact that the distributor, ignition wires and fuel pump was never taken into account, when designed, made them a bit of a job to service. The engine did suffer from poor fuel distribution throughout it's service life, and remains, to this day, as one of the heaviest inline six-cylinder engines ever put in a modern passenger car. Eventually, the crankcase had to be redesigned to allow for a seven-main-bearing crankshaft. And, yes, Virginia, performance options were made available for them, though not many of these parts were ever sold. The "slant six" did lend itself to an endless number of industrial applications, though.
                      Last edited by saltmine; 05-30-2012, 11:23 PM.
                      No good deed goes unpunished.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by mrriggs
                        A guy I work with has several times mentioned the 1960 Ford Falcon he owned way back when. He refers to it as having a slant six. Not much point in correcting him, I know what he meant.
                        I think the reason he might refer to the Falcon as a slant six is because at full throttle, the power output was equivalent to driving down a gradual incline.

                        We had a '65.. we used to refer to the accelerator as the "Volume Pedal" because when you pressed it, the only effect it seemed to have was to make the motor louder.

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                        • #13
                          Funny you should mention it....Back in the 1960's Pontiac was using the GM 250 sic-cylinder as a "base engine" in some of their smaller cars Le Mans, Tempest) In a quest for a sporty engine, Pontiac engineers designed a single overhead camshaft head, with hydraulic lifters for the 250. It was never popular, since one could have a V-8 for a few dollars more...But, the OHC engine did find it's way into the Jeep Gladiator truck, and saw extensive use as a military vehicle.

                          Early Pontiac Tempests were about as close as you can get to a "slant" engine in a GM car. The Tempest sported a front engine-rear transaxle design with GM's famous "speedometer cable" drive. The transaxle was from the Chevy Corvair, as was the rear suspension. Pontiac Marketing boasted of the "nearly flat cabin floor" due to the curved flex-shaft that drove the rear wheels. The engine chosen for the car was a Pontiac 389 V-8....sawed in half, to achieve an inline four cylinder of 195 cubic inches. (International Harvester did the same thing for an engine in their "Scout" series of vehicles, too) The engine was referred to in advertising brochures as the "Trophy" four-cylinder, and as a performance option, had a Rochester four-barrel carburetor.
                          The infamous "speedometer cable" drive shaft was actually a steel rope, bound & wrapped in a protective casing. To guide it along it's curved path, and prevent whip and vibration, four large sealed ball bearings were installed along it's length, which fit into cavities in the sub-frame. (BTW, they were a real monster to change, too.)

                          They probably referred to the Ford Falcon six-cylinder as a "slant-six" because motor mounts used to fail at an alarming rate. We used to have customers come in when the mounts got so bad, they were breaking spark plugs.
                          Last edited by saltmine; 05-30-2012, 11:47 PM.
                          No good deed goes unpunished.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by spongerich
                            I think the reason he might refer to the Falcon as a slant six is because at full throttle, the power output was equivalent to driving down a gradual incline.

                            We had a '65.. we used to refer to the accelerator as the "Volume Pedal" because when you pressed it, the only effect it seemed to have was to make the motor louder.
                            Now I'm a bowtie guy through and through BUT this reminds me of GM pickups with the early Detroit, can't recall if they had a 5.7 in trucks or this was an early 6.2? Helped move a girlfriends furniture in 1982 with her dads pu, came up to a yellow light in the city and I stepped on it heavy, there was a roar and commotion but I swear at no time did the speedometer ever show signs of increasing......I thought to myself these things are dangerous.....the funniest part is her dad owned a diesel injection shop so I would assume his was a souped up version........LOL
                            Opportunity knocks once, temptation leans on the doorbell.....

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by hardtail
                              Now I'm a bowtie guy through and through BUT this reminds me of GM pickups with the early Detroit, can't recall if they had a 5.7 in trucks or this was an early 6.2? Helped move a girlfriends furniture in 1982 with her dads pu, came up to a yellow light in the city and I stepped on it heavy, there was a roar and commotion but I swear at no time did the speedometer ever show signs of increasing......I thought to myself these things are dangerous.....the funniest part is her dad owned a diesel injection shop so I would assume his was a souped up version........LOL
                              Yeah if your going to drive an IDI, you gotta do it with the right one ...
                              Justin Anderson
                              Fortynine Industries

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