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making the cut - cocking piece

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  • making the cut - cocking piece

    Since you guys were so helpful on the problem cut on the bolt, I thought I'd see if anyone had any ideas about the cocking piece.





    This part was designed to be a 17-4PH stainless steel casting. I don't have the foundry print, and since this drawing is missing some rather important details, I suspect there was another machining drawing at one time. Specifically, I don't have the diameter of the keyed cylinder in the middle, or the thickness of the web behind it, which were presumably on the foundry print.

    Anyway, given the +.001/-.000 depth of the groove, would that best be done with a grooving tool or keyseat cutter?

  • #2
    Now that is an ambitious project.

    I've always wondered if plans were available for one of those- I'd rather build an Automag than a bellybutton 1911...

    Where'd you get the drawings?

    Doc.
    Doc's Machine. (Probably not what you expect.)

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    • #3
      There's no complete set of drawings that I know of. Max Gera over on amtguns.info sells copies of some of the prints. Bruce Stark's "Auto Mag: The Pasadena Days" has some dimensioned drawings and shop notes in it. For the rest, I've been buying what's available as pieces show up on the internet.

      I'm trying to build a copy of a complex machine I've never seen, and don't have a full set of drawings or samples for. So far, it has mostly been expensive...

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      • #4
        Okay, in absence of any comments, I'm considering making the cut on the mill on the rotary table, using a keyseat cutter if I can find something appropriate.

        With a cutter narrower than the groove, make the back cut first. That's the one that needs the most metal removed. Use plenty of air and maybe a sucker nozzle connected to the shop vac to keep chips clear. Then raise the quill and make the top cut. Less metal would be removed, and chips would fall away from the working surface.

        Given how critical the groove dimensions are, I'd remove the metal between the ears to clear access to the groove and then make the cut. If it falls out of spec, I can scrap the part with minimal loss of time and effort.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by TRX
          Okay, in absence of any comments, I'm considering making the cut on the mill on the rotary table, using a keyseat cutter if I can find something appropriate.

          With a cutter narrower than the groove, make the back cut first. That's the one that needs the most metal removed. Use plenty of air and maybe a sucker nozzle connected to the shop vac to keep chips clear. Then raise the quill and make the top cut. Less metal would be removed, and chips would fall away from the working surface.

          Given how critical the groove dimensions are, I'd remove the metal between the ears to clear access to the groove and then make the cut. If it falls out of spec, I can scrap the part with minimal loss of time and effort.
          I haven't read your other thread about the bolt, cause I haven't been on the forum in a while, but have you considered buying an AutoMag and reverse engineering the parts you are trying to reproduce?

          The original guns are expensive, but I would think that as long as you don't damage the parts, you should be able to resell the original gun after you take your measurements, without any loss... just sayin'

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          • #6
            I thought of that, but coming up with $2500 or so all in one chunk was more than the entertainment budget could cover.

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