Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Iron eating bacteria

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Iron eating bacteria

    Anyone current on the topic?

    Reason I ask is I almost hijached a thread on coolant. While clean saw seldom gets skanky coolant all bets are off when you saw cast iron. For some reason my coolant gets nasty a few weeks atfer I saw any amount of cast iron. Isn't there an opportunistic iron eating bug?

    Here's something: http://www.aolnews.com/2010/12/08/ir...p-the-titanic/

    I notice unprotected steel in long term contact with earth or stagnent water will pit whereas bare steel in air will plain rust even after years outdoors. Kinda validates the corrosion cell theory.

    Mr Spock: comment? Analysis?

  • #2
    If you toss iron (sulphate) into the ocean you can cause huge phytoplankton blooms. There are a number of schemes to use this method to move CO2 from the air to the ocean bottom. Probably not a good idea, but it also indicates that iron is food to algae.

    Comment


    • #3
      The stuff exists all over central Mississippi, in the ground water. Its hell on well screens, creating some kind of mucus like substance that clogs them up.
      James Kilroy

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by dp
        If you toss iron (sulphate) into the ocean you can cause huge phytoplankton blooms. There are a number of schemes to use this method to move CO2 from the air to the ocean bottom. Probably not a good idea, but it also indicates that iron is food to algae.
        I think is is a great idea. You can do it with super fine iron powder as well.

        Phytoplankton breed, CO2 is turned to calcium carbonate and it is locked away for good. once the iron is used up it stops.

        Comment


        • #5
          I never use collant for cast iron. Always cut it dry on thw saw, mill, and lathe. Also cover the lathe bed and mill table when working with cast iron
          Craftsman 101.07403
          Grizzly G0704
          4x6 Bandsaw

          Comment


          • #6
            No one really specifically uses coolant for cast. The cast dust and filings do get mixed in on machines that are used to machine both, though.

            Comment


            • #7
              Pitting corrosion of iron and steel in anaerobic conditions is caused by sulphate reducing bacteria.

              Phil

              PS: Here's a straightforward description of the process etc. http://www.infrastructure.alberta.ca...TechPres19.pdf

              Originally posted by Forrest Addy
              Anyone current on the topic?

              Reason I ask is I almost hijached a thread on coolant. While clean saw seldom gets skanky coolant all bets are off when you saw cast iron. For some reason my coolant gets nasty a few weeks atfer I saw any amount of cast iron. Isn't there an opportunistic iron eating bug?

              Here's something: http://www.aolnews.com/2010/12/08/ir...p-the-titanic/

              I notice unprotected steel in long term contact with earth or stagnent water will pit whereas bare steel in air will plain rust even after years outdoors. Kinda validates the corrosion cell theory.

              Mr Spock: comment? Analysis?
              Last edited by philbur; 06-01-2012, 03:20 AM.

              Comment


              • #8
                If you ever watched movies about the RMS Titanic you will see what looks like rusticles hanging down. Scientists have detirmined that some form of plankton is actually creating those rusticles and that the entire ship may one day may no longer to support its own weight and collapse. Frank

                Comment


                • #9
                  Dry cutting for cast iron gets my vote as well, and it is the recommended procedure.
                  Tel

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Dry cutting is the best way, but if you are doing a lot of work, wear a mask. The dust really builds up in your nose and chest. The results are unpleasant and probably not good for your health. I notice this more and more as I get older.
                    Bill

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I tried a bunch of different coolants for the bandsaw. I just cut everything dry now. Coolant is way to much of a hassle all around to save a blade a little longer.


                      The reason I believe steel/iron/metal rusts faster in earth is because it is in constant contact with "something". I see it in vehicles all the time. Stuff only rusts or rusts the worse where it is in constant contact with something else (holds moister and dirt).
                      Andy

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by jkilroy
                        The stuff exists all over central Mississippi, in the ground water. Its hell on well screens, creating some kind of mucus like substance that clogs them up.
                        Ah don't worry,that's just the bacteria that mutated after the Project Dribble nuke tests
                        I just need one more tool,just one!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          When working with CI I use the shopvac. I put a second hose in the exhaust port and run it out side. Gets ride of the dust.
                          Craftsman 101.07403
                          Grizzly G0704
                          4x6 Bandsaw

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Bees wax is all I use on the metal cutting band saw. Easy to apply and doesn't run all over. Buddy has bee hives for honey and I get a big plug of wax now and then.

                            Comment

                            Working...
                            X