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OT but useful I think - PU spare tire holders

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  • #16
    Originally posted by justanengineer
    Automakers cant design a solution to the owner's problems, only the vehicle's. I also thought we were discussing trucks, not minivans with identity issues.
    Sorry, I don't follow your logic that it's the owners problem because the auto design team can't solve a simple issue (ie easy access to the spare tire).

    FYI, It's not a minivan and can tow more than the piece of crap so called US built 'truck' I previously owned.

    We were discussing the PITA it is to change a spare tire and accessing it. Laugh if you like, but I'll be long on my way while everyone else is still trying to figure out how to gain access to their spare. Honda's idea could easily be implemented in any pickup.

    Robert

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    • #17
      Actually not just as easy -- Honda's Ridgeliner is actually unibody - makes it real handy to just put a dish in the metal and then run with it...

      Yes - a unibody truck -- not impressed with the fuel economy either - personally and because I work on Japanese I will make this statement -- the best decade for Japanese vehicles was in the 90's,,,,, they had it all - they climbed the ladder to the very top with refinement, practicality and quality...

      I have not seen the best of things since...

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      • #18
        Originally posted by RTPBurnsville
        Sorry, I don't follow your logic that it's the owners problem because the auto design team can't solve a simple issue (ie easy access to the spare tire).
        There is no issue. If maintained properly, these systems work well like everything else on a vehicle. Hopefully that can clear up a bit of the logic for you.

        When I still lived on the farm, I regularly loaded up the undercarriage of my truck pretty solid with mud, dirt, and vegetation and never have I had an issue with mine. 30 seconds with either the "screwdriver blade" end of a lug wrench, or a large screwdriver and the spare was easily removed without fail - bc I maintained the system.

        Disclaimer - When I was wrenching on vehicles for a living I did see these mechanisms fail upon occasion, almost always on vehicles that also needed doors and windows adjusted, plastic interior parts replaced, or had other damage due to neglect. Simply stated tho - you cannot claim a system sucks when you dont maintain it as the OP freely admitted he didnt.
        Last edited by justanengineer; 06-06-2012, 05:01 PM.
        "I am, and ever will be, a white-socks, pocket-protector, nerdy engineer -- born under the second law of thermodynamics, steeped in the steam tables, in love with free-body diagrams, transformed by Laplace, and propelled by compressible flow."

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        • #19
          For a real mess, try a Chrysler T&C minivan! The spare is mounted between the front passenger seats! You have to fish the tire out from under with a "tool" provided.On some models, mine, you have to remove the center console. You cannot even check the air pressure without lowering the spare. Bob.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by justanengineer
            Every time I change my oil, I check tire air pressure and condition to include the spare, which means I have to crank the spare down, put a gage on it, and manually spin it to look for damage.
            I also always check the air pressure in all five tires, but I've never needed to lower the spare.

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