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Need advice and suggestions..Moving BP mill...

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  • Need advice and suggestions..Moving BP mill...

    Gentlemen,

    I will be loading my mill into a trailer that has a drop deck feature.

    I plan on moving the mill with black pipe and effort.

    My question is..how to get the black pipe under the mill? I will be placing the mill in the trailer with a fork lift..but once I get it home, I am will have no way to lift it.

    So how do I get the pipe under the mill to start? I have a come along.. i can some how tip it back wards some... just didnt know if there was a better way.

    I will be calling my local tow shop to see if they can help me out for a modest fee...

  • #2
    I'm also interested in how you will make the initial lift. I know if you search for the thread Cincinatti mill saga. The op use a porta power with a 2 inch head to lift the mill onto his wheels. Idk how he made the initial lift though.

    Comment


    • #3
      Good idea !
      Don't try to move it with pipes out of the trailer . It may tip over ( seen it before !)and then you will have a real problem.
      Some states or insurance companies do not allow tow trucks to "move " machinery.
      I have had them move /load/unload/my stuff a lot.

      If they tell you they can't move it , just have them pick up the mill, and then drive the trailer away before lowering it ! simple !

      Make sure you lower the table( knee) all the way down.
      also move the table back against the column
      Rotate the head, untill it is upside down, and support it with blocks on the table. (You may want to raise the knee an inch or so to take up )
      Lifting straps around the ram work pretty well

      Rich
      Use a crow bar and walk around the base , using 3/4 inch thick boards, to raise the base for pipes. Carefully
      Last edited by Rich Carlstedt; 06-05-2012, 10:15 PM.

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      • #4
        If you use small rollers you can get them under with a pry bar. I do not like large rollers because of the tipping danger if one rolls out and the rest do not support the load well. Getting the first two large rollers underneath is scary unless you can lift the machine straight up. Of course, large rollers move easier over rough surfaces.

        Be very careful that you have the mill under control at all times. There have been a lot of levers, handles, and worse broken by a machine falling over. If it does start to fall, get away and let it go, make no attempt to stop it.

        I would advise letting someone with a lift do the job. Just be sure he doesnt put a chain or cable around something that it will damage. A few short 4x4" blocks between the chain and machine will help prevent damage.
        Don Young

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        • #5
          My J1 has a notch in the middle of the front of the base. I used a pry bar to lift and wedges under the sides, rebite with the bar and a block then slide the first pipe under the base. Inch the machine forward and add rollers. Use a come along to pull the machine and have a tag line loosely cleated on the back side to stop any sudden rolls.

          Work slow, plan each move, and plan an escape route in case something goes wrong. Communicate exactly what you want your assistant to do and make sure they have an escape route planned. Plan the work and work the plan and things should go well, but if things go wrong it will happen fast.

          It's not rocket science, it's Egyptian science.

          Good luck,

          Rick

          Comment


          • #6
            Leave 1-1/2 pipe under the back, strap it well, have 2 long bars like we used Sun. You may need a 3/4 or 1" pipe to put on the floor right where it comes off the trailer. Have several pipes & a buddy or 2. It will go very easy. I've always hauled & moved them a little different the he had them set. I lower everthing I can & turn the table & lay the head on the bed to lower the center of gravity. You know we we're loaded & we didn't have to touch a single thing not even tighten a strap. Long day 17 hrs. I hauled one just like yours on a drop gate sng axle low trailer with a comralong plywoog & pipe. You won't have any trouble. Did you get my address? Again Thanks for my part of the deal. Let me know when she's set & making chips. Eric
            Last edited by flylo; 06-05-2012, 10:23 PM.
            "Let me recommend the best medicine in the
            world: a long journey, at a mild season, through a pleasant
            country, in easy stages."
            ~ James Madison

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            • #7
              Rob, forgot to tell you $97 total in fuel. Not bad for the load. I looked up the big mill 3300#. I really like him though. He's a great guy. I was one hurting massive charliehorse when we got home, we never ate all day & had to unload the next day. Thanks again!
              "Let me recommend the best medicine in the
              world: a long journey, at a mild season, through a pleasant
              country, in easy stages."
              ~ James Madison

              Comment


              • #8
                at least trun the head unside down with the knee all the way down it lowers the center of gravity. this helps elimamite some of the tip over factor. removing the ram and head from the mill would do better.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Rob, sorry to post again. But better idea. Use a pallet jack. You proble have them at work but for $50-$100 you can get nice ones on C/L. Load the mill on the trailer on a pallet jack 5500# rated. Turn the front wheel sideways, lower the pallet jack so the mill is on boards like we did, strap like crazy. When home lower the trailer, unstrap but strap mill to pallet jack 2 straps, raise jack, remove boards, have 2 people steady/watch mill, keep jack as low as possible,roll off easy & you can put it anywhere you want even leave on jack until it's positioned. Just lower the jack. My big one is on a pallet jack now. Better idea!
                  "Let me recommend the best medicine in the
                  world: a long journey, at a mild season, through a pleasant
                  country, in easy stages."
                  ~ James Madison

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    If you have to ask how to rig it, you're better off hiring a professional

                    A friend of mine tried to do what you're doing with a new CNC mill and he was quite happy to have been able to get out of the way as it toppled over. The mill was quite happy to get new ballscrews and many hundreds of dollars worth of new parts.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      You can do the initial lift with a simple pry bar. I have one about 5' long that I used. A normal BP mill will only weigh about 1800#. Lift and shim, lift and shim repeat as necessary. Don't forget about using a pallet jack, they're very handy for moving equipment.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Moved 8 or 9 Bridgy's now, took every one to pieces and moved them in a normal van.
                        Good thing about taking them to pieces is it's safer, nothing tips over, and you can lift and place everything with a cheap 1 ton crane.

                        Another advantage is you get to clean all the crud out of the knee and get to check various items that can give trouble further down the line like head bolts stretching, teeth missing off the worm wheel and loose bevel gears on the knee screw.

                        Don't like rollers, seen too many machines tip over when they come off one or they spin a roller out.

                        That big TOS lathe in the Minus 1 and counting thread was moved out just using a couple of steel plates with a dollop of oil on them.

                        No lifting tackle was used other than a pry bar to get the plate under the leading end to start. Bars were spread across doorways and used as an anchor to winch on.
                        .

                        Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Tamper84
                          I'm also interested in how you will make the initial lift. I know if you search for the thread Cincinatti mill saga. The op use a porta power with a 2 inch head to lift the mill onto his wheels. Idk how he made the initial lift though.
                          I had to use a Port O Power for the Cinci because it weighs over 4K - couldn't budge it with a 3ft pry bar.

                          For smaller machines I do like everyone else and pry it up with a long pry bar. I found that I can comfortably get 1/4" - 1/2" lift for each bite. I have a selection of 1/4-1/2 shims on hand and a couple of chunks of steel of rising thickness to use as a fulcrum. Then I "jack" up the bottom until I get the rollers underneath.

                          I don't like the idea of rollers under a machine on an incline like a ramp - if it gets away then it could get really moving. I do like to lag a couple of 4X6 under neath to extend out the base. I makes the transitions between surfaces much smoother and I think it makes for a much more stable move from front to back - all while spreading out the weight.

                          Anyone can move a machine if you think it through, but if you are short on time it is way better to get help in the form of a tow truck, than to try to do the work in a hurry.

                          Good luck - let us know how it went.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Love that description. :-)

                            <It's not rocket science, it's Egyptian science.>
                            ...lew...

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I used pipe rollers on my clone, but had to mount the base to 4 x 4s since the bottom edge of the base is stepped. Moving on rollers is pretty effortless, but turning corners can be tricky. Don't get in a hurry.

                              Here are some pictures of my move. The move from my garage, down the stairs, and across the shop was all done solo.

                              http://bullfire.net/Mill/Milling%20Machine.html
                              For just a little more, you can do it yourself!

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