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  • Tilting or angle vise for mill

    How important is it to have a vise that tilts or angle off the table for milling. There is so much cheap sh** out there its difficult to see what is robust and tight enough for even a small milling machine like my Clausing 8520.
    It looks like the 2 inch is too small to really be usefull and anything bigger than 4-5 inches takes most all my z axis!
    Skipd1

  • #2
    The worst thing about an angle vise is that after you get it, clean it up, grease things and put it on the shelf for that "special" project is that you'll likely never again run into the problem that made you want it in the first place. I'm sure that there are some folks who use theirs daily but when I look at the 75 pounds of cast iron and think about moving the Kurt from the table, moving the angle vise in, setting it up only to make a single cut and have to return everything back to their normal places I usually find a way to set it up on ther mill w/o the angle vise.

    (I suppose that I should be glad that I have it else I'd never setup the job for all the wishing that I had an angle vise...)

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    • #3
      It'll vary from one person to the next, but (in my case), 95% of my work is square (at least, it's supposed to be...).

      So the most important thing for me has been to have a rigid vise, without the need to tilt. I had mine on a rotary base, I even removed that and now clamp the vise straight to the table.

      For the, say, 5% of work that does need tilting, if it'll fit between the jaws lengthwise, you can pack it up at an angle and get your angle that way. Either using bought angle pieces, or a sine bar.

      My mill has the ability to 'nod' it's head - which is how I did the few odd long bits that I needed to mill - think excavator blade profile.

      And yes, it seems like everything's out to steal your daylight between work and cutter tip!

      Ian
      All of the gear, no idea...

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      • #4
        what are you trying mill? until you have something you actually need it for, I wouldn worry about.....talk to you in ten years
        in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

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        • #5
          Not often but handy for smaller stuff.

          Sometimes, if I need to set something relatively small at an angle I hold the item in a 2" or so vice and hold that vice at an angle in the rather nasty " Kurt " copy which is the one most commonly on the vertical mill. I do not suppose it would pass for Nasa but no one has ever complained about what I have made in this way.Come to think of it, I do not believe I even own a tilting vice. Regards David Powell.

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          • #6
            Tilting or angle vise

            Thanks for the advise, as I am new at this I certainly appreciate your experience with respect to this tool. I certainly can use the money for something more usefull, like actual tooling. Thanks

            Skipd1




            Originally posted by Ian B
            It'll vary from one person to the next, but (in my case), 95% of my work is square (at least, it's supposed to be...)

            So the most important thing for me has been to have a rigid vise, without the need to tilt. I had mine on a rotary base, I even removed that and now clamp the vise straight to the table.

            For the, say, 5% of work that does need tilting, if it'll fit between the jaws lengthwise, you can pack it up at an angle and get your angle that way. Either using bought angle pieces, or a sine bar.

            My mill has the ability to 'nod' it's head - which is how I did the few odd long bits that I needed to mill - think excavator blade profile.

            And yes, it seems like everything's out to steal your daylight between work and cutter tip!

            Ian

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            • #7
              The odd time I've needed to tilt a vice on an angle, I just use step clamps to hold it down, and a sine bar to dial up for the angle. More rigidity than with a swivel base, and about as accurate an angle setting as you want to fuss around with. Of course you need a sine bar, and gauge blocks (but you can buy those with the money you saved on a swivel base, and have them for other uses).

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              • #8
                If the workpiece isn't to big, you can get an adjustable V block from the usual sources, and they do have a vernier on them, for relatively small money. I ran a job several months ago, and had the to tilt the head on the Lagun for 4 different angles. The job just repeated, no Lagun, so I bought one of the adjustable V blocks, for about 80.00 delivered. Money well spent. I ran that section of the job about 3 times faster, and didn't have sweep the head afterwards. The Gorton's head doesn't tilt.
                Several years ago I took all the swivel bases off the mill vises, and they never went back on. Not only did I gain more daylight, but the vises were about 20 LBS lighter. I eventually replaced all the import vises with Kurts, and never ordered the swivel bases.
                Harry
                Last edited by beckley23; 06-06-2012, 05:06 PM.

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                • #9
                  Adjustable angle block

                  As I recall, this link was an outgrowth of the "Tools you thought would be more useful" thread: http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb...-block-235275/

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                  • #10
                    I have machined a variety small parts that needed an angle vise on the mill table. Most of them have not required any great precision in setting the angles and all of them have been less than two or three inches in their greatest dimension. I have used two inexpensive angle vises and found them both to be satisfactory for such light duty work on an occasional basis. These are the styles I have used:

                    http://www.use-enco.com/CGI/INSRIT?P...&PARTPG=INLMK3

                    and

                    http://www.wttool.com/index/page/pro..._shopping=true

                    If you have larger or more serious work or just like having the best tools, you can easily spend more money:

                    http://www.use-enco.com/CGI/INSRIT?P...&PARTPG=INLMK3

                    I am sure they are better than the cheapies I have used.

                    If you need great precision then consider a sine bar.
                    Paul A.
                    SE Texas

                    And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
                    You will find that it has discrete steps.

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                    • #11
                      skipd1,

                      What are you making?

                      Components for NASA, or model steam engines, or bits for tractors & excavators?

                      It really comes down to your needs - I'm a steam engine & tractor type, others on this board work to far more precision than I ever will (or could).

                      Home shop machinists by their nature are extremely inventive - they manage to do machining jobs far in excess of the original capacity of their machines. They rig up setups to do one-offs that would never be seen in industry; far too time consuming. But to us, it's a hobby (well, to me, at least), and time spent in the workshop is good time.

                      Often, having less is more - you don't have a 12 axis CNC milling machine to produce that bizarre component? Well, find another way of doing it. Can't afford to get a one-off casting made? Fabricate & machine it. May not be as good, but you'll be proud of the end result. And you'll learn a huge amount in the process.

                      Buy equipment as you really need it. In the meantime, make do with what you have, improvise, and you'll get a long way.

                      Ian
                      All of the gear, no idea...

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by skipd1
                        How important is it to have a vise that tilts or angle off the table for milling. There is so much cheap sh** out there its difficult to see what is robust and tight enough for even a small milling machine like my Clausing 8520.
                        It looks like the 2 inch is too small to really be usefull and anything bigger than 4-5 inches takes most all my z axis!
                        Skipd1
                        It all depends on your needs and your budget.

                        Not all cheap stuff is sh** and not all "good" stuff is good - or cheap - shop around.

                        I have tilting tables - 5" x 7" (a bit small) and a 10" x 7" (much better) both of which fit on my HF-45 and Sieg X3 mills.

                        http://littlemachineshop.com/product...3878&category=

                        http://i200.photobucket.com/albums/a...c/HF45-4-1.jpg

                        http://i200.photobucket.com/albums/a.../SeigX3_15.jpg

                        http://i200.photobucket.com/albums/a.../SeigX3_24.jpg

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