Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Last part of the big grill...charcoal pans

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Last part of the big grill...charcoal pans

    I did them both today using the cut, fold, and weld process with some 1/8" steel. First is cutting them with the plasma torch so they can be folded along interrupted cuts.



    That's followed by folding and tacking.



    And finally welding up the joints.





    I got such good burn-through that I don't need to weld the inside.
    Last edited by winchman; 06-06-2012, 08:40 PM.
    Any products mentioned in my posts have been endorsed by their manufacturer.

  • #2
    Nice way to deal with bending if you don't have a 10awg box/pan brake!

    Comment


    • #3
      Nice work Winchman, looks great!!

      Comment


      • #4
        Very slick...nice job.

        John

        Comment


        • #5
          Nice stuff ! What are you using for your plasma straightedge? Also, do you have any videos of your winches? Seems to me you did, and I enjoyed your winch building process. So, whats new in the winch building game??

          Comment


          • #6
            I picked out a straight piece of 1" x 1/8" steel angle to use as a guide for cutting.

            I've stopped building winches and other stuff, and I rarely fly my sailplane any more. It was just too hard to find good motors for the high-powered winches people really wanted, and I didn't have any way to test them. They'd easily rip the wings off my 20-year-old plane.

            The idea of standing out in the sun for several hours flying the sailplane just doesn't appeal much to me any more, and there's no one around who plays with them, either. I spend all my time with the welding and fabrication work at the school. When I get home, I read, work logic and math puzzles, or watch science programs on TV.

            The only winch video is here:


            There are only a couple guys building winches any more, and they're part-time operations. They usually make several at a time, and have a waiting list of customers. Here's the website for one:

            http://www.mgertech.com/COMET-WINCHES.htm

            There's a market there for someone who can do nice work, and it's entirely within the realm of most home-shop machinists.
            Last edited by winchman; 06-07-2012, 02:01 AM.
            Any products mentioned in my posts have been endorsed by their manufacturer.

            Comment


            • #7
              Nice work, thinking and execution.......

              I have a similar project coming up and if the 812 brake at work won't touch it I'll be stealing your idea.......any warpage of the welded joint?
              Opportunity knocks once, temptation leans on the doorbell.....

              Comment


              • #8
                I worked my way around the pan doing one section per side at a time. It doesn't rock when sitting on the flat table right side up or bottom up, so I'd say the warpage is minimal.

                I left 1/4" ties at each end and about every 6" in between. It was easy enough to bend with a large pair of pliers, and it tied the pieces together pretty well for welding.

                I made a replacement chip pan for the Dake-Johnson horizontal band saw a while back using the same method with the same excellent results. It's only been in use for several months, so I'll try to get a picture of it.
                Any products mentioned in my posts have been endorsed by their manufacturer.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by millwrong
                  Nice stuff ! What are you using for your plasma straightedge? Also, do you have any videos of your winches? Seems to me you did, and I enjoyed your winch building process. So, whats new in the winch building game??
                  Here is what I use for a straight edge.

                  With the hard drive magnets, you also can use Masonite for shapes a straight or curved cuts. The magnets just make it easier to keep in place. Longer lines I just add more magnets.

                  In place

                  The cut, I just keep the magnets about 2" from the cutting edge. Only thing when using the cutting guide you have to remember you have to add ½ the distance from the center line of your nozzle to your line so it ends up in the correct place.
                  Glen
                  Been there, probably broke it, doing that!
                  I am not a lawyer, and never played one on TV!
                  All the usual and standard disclaimers apply. Do not try this at home, use only as directed, No warranties express or implied, for the intended use or the suggested uses, Wear safety glasses, closed course, professionals only

                  Comment

                  Working...
                  X