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do boring bars need hardening?

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  • #46
    So you just answered the question,

    given the same price you would choose the heat treated BB...

    no further questions...

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    • #47
      Actually, I said that I would not pay extra for a heat treated bar. I said I would only buy if it was on sale.

      Tom
      Tom - Spotsylvania, VA

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      • #48
        yes - on sale for the same price as the non-heat treated.

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        • #49
          Originally posted by Evan

          BTW, the property "resilience" is a measure of how much restoration to original shape may be expected from a deformed material. It isn't a property of metals.


          Just like I stated earlier when it comes to metals you will generally find the words resilient and durable in regards to heat treating...

          "Our blocking hammers are heat treated after they are CNC machined from 4340 steel to make them exceptionally durable and resilient."

          http://www.fournierenterprises.com/c...roductid=16185

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          • #50
            Originally posted by justanengineer
            Regarding gouging/damaging the bar, I would much rather a boring bar get marred up than something expensive.

            Yes but swarf is not something expensive ..

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            • #51
              Originally posted by A.K. Boomer
              Yes but swarf is not something expensive ..
              I was thinking more along the lines of a tool holder or in my case, a boring tool post.

              Your point about purchasing a boring bar is moot in many situations here tho. Im one of many on here that would never buy a boring bar bc I can make them cheaply and easily to fit the specific setup I need. Being that Im not a production shop, I have no need to use insert tooling and rather choose to use HSS and brazed carbide, and in my shop a boring bar has a good chance of outliving me.

              If youre super concerned about lifespan of a boring bar, it really should not be machined steel stock regardless, it should be carbide or other harder materials. Personally, if I was to need a more durable boring bar, I would simpy acquire a few round stock forgings as I have access to a free source.
              "I am, and ever will be, a white-socks, pocket-protector, nerdy engineer -- born under the second law of thermodynamics, steeped in the steam tables, in love with free-body diagrams, transformed by Laplace, and propelled by compressible flow."

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              • #52
                Thanks to all for input. From what I learned hardening might help around the margins but is not essential such as would be with collets, parallels, ect. I never imagined that I would bend it from a crash but was more concerned with chatter. I am making one for hss and one that takes inserts. Because I enjoy the process I might harden the seat but will leave the rest alone.

                I also learned that price is an important quality in steel not mentioned in Machinery's Handbook.

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                • #53
                  double post.
                  Last edited by A.K. Boomer; 06-11-2012, 09:00 AM.

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                  • #54
                    I think that's a wise choice as it will make the seat and threads more durable and easy enough to do, and right you would not improve the chatter factor either way if you did the entire bar, although I will say this -- if it's a bar with a flat on top and your holding it with set screws - check those set screws for tightness after a really good chatter "sessions" because odds are they will have sunken into the "cheese metal"

                    It's not that price is a quality of steel - it just makes it more obtainable, and a good quality heat treat isn't free...

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                    • #55
                      I will ask you again. What is the resilience of 1020 steel?
                      Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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                      • #56
                        Price is not a property of metal, either.
                        I see you are not familiar with the gold market.
                        Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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                        • #57
                          Originally posted by Evan
                          I will ask you again. What is the resilience of 1020 steel?

                          and I will tell you one last time --- 1020 mild steel is far less resilient than heat treated 4130,

                          are you looking for a number rating? don't - read the write ups about the qualities and properties of how the material is effected and takes to a proper heat treating... like the example I gave earlier,

                          "Just like I stated earlier when it comes to metals you will generally find the words resilient and durable in regards to heat treating...

                          "Our blocking hammers are heat treated after they are CNC machined from 4340 steel to make them exceptionally durable and resilient."

                          http://www.fournierenterprises.com/c...roductid=16185

                          this is all getting easier for me cuz I can just copy and paste everything --- have a nice day
                          Last edited by A.K. Boomer; 06-11-2012, 02:59 PM.

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                          • #58
                            Find me an example.
                            Last edited by Evan; 06-11-2012, 03:21 PM.
                            Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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                            • #59
                              Duh,,,

                              first I correct you on the definition of strength and how heat treating a boring bar adds it - then I correct you on how many ways heat treating makes a boring bar more durable - then I correct you that the words both resilient and durability are used to describe the characteristics of what happens to certain metals after they undergo a heat treating process - then you want an example and I give it to you, then you brain fart and ask again and I give it to you, then still one more time you ask again when it's hanging right above your post you just wrote,

                              so now it forces me to get personal --- did you have a stroke recently?

                              are you feeling ok? is there anything we can do for you?

                              If something like this happened please have you wife PM me with your address and I will put together a nice care package for you -- maybe some of the other guys will pitch in too,, good luck to you old friend... were all pullin for ya...
                              Last edited by A.K. Boomer; 06-11-2012, 04:06 PM.

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                              • #60
                                "Just like I stated earlier when it comes to metals you will generally find the words resilient and durable in regards to heat treating...

                                "Our blocking hammers are heat treated after they are CNC machined from 4340 steel to make them exceptionally durable and resilient."
                                Advertiser often use vague, unmeasurable terms like "exceptional." They might have well said it was "wholesome."


                                I see you are not familiar with the gold market.
                                Ha!

                                Tom
                                Tom - Spotsylvania, VA

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