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  • A.K. Boomer
    replied
    Originally posted by John Stevenson
    Tim,
    I don't like the way that tug is slung just on two straps .

    Needs a strap round the top to stop the slings slipping.

    Ask the ex-perts on this forum................


    Ohh dear god -- now someones got their little panties in a wad and all those that were involved in this great injustice will be greeted for years to come with bitterness and resentment

    Geeze - even asked about your lawnmower too just to try and smooth things over

    Leave a comment:


  • Tyro 001
    replied
    I think a strap around the smoke stack would have been good.....a chain even better.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by John Stevenson
    Tim,
    I don't like the way that tug is slung just on two straps .

    Needs a strap round the top to stop the slings slipping.

    Ask the ex-perts on this forum................
    I was an Oiler on truck cranes for about 6 weeks and my opinion is ..............

    Leave a comment:


  • John Stevenson
    replied
    Originally posted by Timleech



    Tim

    Tim,
    I don't like the way that tug is slung just on two straps .

    Needs a strap round the top to stop the slings slipping.

    Ask the ex-perts on this forum................

    Leave a comment:


  • Alistair Hosie
    replied
    Wow thats aboat with beautiful lines well done for making it.Alistair

    Leave a comment:


  • A.K. Boomer
    replied
    That tugs got a very nice classic shape to her,,, I have to admit though I guessed it's running direction wrong in the first pic,

    seeing it out of the water proved me wrong...

    Leave a comment:


  • Timleech
    replied
    Originally posted by DICKEYBIRD
    Fantastic job Tim, thanks for posting. A man needs an epic project occasionally to get the juices flowing. There's no better feeling than to successfully complete an impossible mission. One can always sleep later.

    Now, what's 'er name?
    KENNET, which is one of the bigger tributaries of the River Thames.

    Tim

    Leave a comment:


  • DICKEYBIRD
    replied
    Fantastic job Tim, thanks for posting. A man needs an epic project occasionally to get the juices flowing. There's no better feeling than to successfully complete an impossible mission. One can always sleep later.

    Now, what's 'er name?

    Leave a comment:


  • oil mac
    replied
    Tim,

    Well done with your little river tug, Your dedication & hard work has paid off She looks a really nice little craft with fine lines & if i may say so, "eye candy," Proceeding along with her red duster flying

    Was she originally a coal fired vessel? I somehow or other recall some of your previous posts on this little ship, But not the details, Health to enjoy sailing her

    Tim your last posting on the details, beat mine by a second or two Thanks again
    Last edited by oil mac; 06-10-2012, 07:20 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Timleech
    replied
    Originally posted by .RC.
    Nice.... What are it's dimensions?
    35' x 9' x 3'6" draught


    Originally posted by justanengineer
    Definitely cool. I didnt know tugs were built so small. How big of a boat/barge can that thing tow?

    Congrats on the rebuild effort. Any other site we would likely see a restore thread on a fishing or speed boat, but not on HSM.
    It was built in 1931 for the Thames Conservancy, for among other things towing maintenance boats, dredging hoppers etc on the Upper Thames. Quite small stuff, maybe 50 ton barges at a guess. Original engine was a 54 bhp Gardner, but it was a direct-reversing 3-cyl 2-stroke. There have been two other engines in between, but now it's back to a Gardner of similar horsepower only maybe one-third of the size & weight. The basic engine, based on engine number, is actually late 1930's, not that much younger than the boat but the next generation of diesels and they (L2 & LW Gardners) were a huge advance when the were introduced in the early 1930s and were some of the first diesels to be successfully fitted into motor vehicles. The point of the recent change was to free up some space for some basic accommodation so the boat can be used for more than just occasional nights in the tiny fo'c'stle cabin, the new engine is transversely mounted to maximise space available.
    The drive system works really well, speed can be controlled both with engine speed and the pump displacement setting, so it can be set so that the prop is just flopping over to give low speed steerage. A huge improvement on the previous arrangement. The engine (Kelvin) and hydraulic gearbox were good, but the prop was a bit big for the engine and in deep water we would be going at about 4mph on tickover - not great for manoeuvring. It was also 90 bhp, which is too much for pottering about on restricted waters, never had any work to do. The one downside, so far, is that it's noisier that I had hoped for. There doesn't seem to be any way of predicting noise levels from hydraulic systems, some are very quiet but others less so. I'll be applying some sound insulation in due course to see whether that helps. Even with the hydraulics whine, it's quieter in the wheelbox with the new system than it was with the old one so maybe I shouldn't complain.

    Here she is being loaded on to the wagon for the journey south:-



    Tim
    Last edited by Timleech; 06-10-2012, 07:22 AM.

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  • oldtiffie
    replied
    Really really nice work Tim.

    I recall the thread referred to.

    There must have been some blood sweat and tears and a lot of sleepness nights, money, patience, endurance and very great skill go into it.

    I am really pleased that your met your objectives and time-lines etc. and that you are satisfied with it.

    Leave a comment:


  • lugnut
    replied
    Very nice, thanks for sharing!

    Leave a comment:


  • justanengineer
    replied
    Definitely cool. I didnt know tugs were built so small. How big of a boat/barge can that thing tow?

    Congrats on the rebuild effort. Any other site we would likely see a restore thread on a fishing or speed boat, but not on HSM.

    Leave a comment:


  • BigMike782
    replied
    How cool is that?
    I'll bet there are not many on here that can say they have a working tug.

    Leave a comment:


  • A.K. Boomer
    replied
    Shipshape and bristol fashion Mate... very nice
    Last edited by A.K. Boomer; 06-09-2012, 09:51 PM.

    Leave a comment:

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