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The two collars test in a lathe factory....... Hendy factory tour

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  • The two collars test in a lathe factory....... Hendy factory tour

    Shown about halfway down this page of interesting photos..........

    http://www.lathes.co.uk/hendeyfactory/page4.html

    The whole Hendy factory tour photoset (1943)

    http://www.lathes.co.uk/hendeyfactory/index.html
    1601

    Keep eye on ball.
    Hashim Khan

  • #2
    Very interesting set of photos. Thank you.
    Mike
    WI/IL border, USA

    Comment


    • #3
      Ah, back in the day....

      I note the almost complete absence of protective clothing for the foundry workers. (One guy has goggles.)
      "A machinist's (WHAP!) best friend (WHAP! WHAP!) is his hammer. (WHAP!)" - Fred Tanner, foreman, Lunenburg Foundry and Engineering machine shop, circa 1979

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      • #4
        Love it! Thanks for sharing. Is that a new addition to the Lathes.co.uk site? Don't recall seeing it before.

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        • #5
          Neat pictures!

          I don't envy the guy whose job it was to mike the bore diameters of the spindle bearings!

          Notice not a pair of safety glasses in sight...
          "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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          • #6
            Yeah. At the top of the main manufacturers' page for Tony's site, there is a "new additions" list. I look there from time to time to see what has been updated. The Hendy tour is only a few days? Old.

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            • #7
              Yes, there is the two collars method (or actually three judging from the photo) and just below it is a test bar method shown.
              Amount of experience is in direct proportion to the value of broken equipment.

              Comment


              • #8
                The last picture on the page shows a hob being relieved and I'm curious what the process was. There's no mechanism to advance and retract the tool that I can see. They mention a very low speed so do you suppose they just do tooth by tooth going around the thing? That sound high stress in terms of the start/stop and pretty tedious.
                .
                "People will occasionally stumble over the truth, but most of the time they will pick themselves up and carry on" : Winston Churchill

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                • #9
                  We had a guy at GM back in the 70's, always wore a shirt, tie, apron,and a bowler hat in the winter and a straw hat in the summer. He was a genuine character, his name was Jim Gladstone. He was a metal model maker by classification ,and a real character.The GM division was Fisher Body. Bob.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by J Tiers
                    Shown about halfway down this page of interesting photos..........
                    Bit of a fatal flaw in your argument... It says spindle alignment as the photo caption, not bed twisting test...

                    They are using that test to prove the lathe turns parallel within the specs, after it has been set up correctly... It is probably the final test they do before shipping it out the door...
                    Precision takes time.

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                    • #11
                      Great photos, thanks for the link

                      I like on Page # 5, "The Incentive and Rate Setting Department"


                      On page # 2, 3rd photo down, they show the manufacturing of a lead screw, what is the direction of travel?
                      Interesting system of rests given the relative size of the screw v. overall length

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by .RC.
                        Bit of a fatal flaw in your argument... It says spindle alignment as the photo caption, not bed twisting test...

                        They are using that test to prove the lathe turns parallel within the specs, after it has been set up correctly... It is probably the final test they do before shipping it out the door...
                        You bet it is spindle/headstock alignment (the bar is spindle/taper alignment).

                        It isn't FOR twist...... levels are for twist.
                        1601

                        Keep eye on ball.
                        Hashim Khan

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by TGTool
                          The last picture on the page shows a hob being relieved and I'm curious what the process was. There's no mechanism to advance and retract the tool that I can see. They mention a very low speed so do you suppose they just do tooth by tooth going around the thing? That sound high stress in terms of the start/stop and pretty tedious.
                          There is a picture about two thirds of the way down page 2 that shows another shot of a lathe with relieving gear, you can see a shaft that runs along the front of the lathe and into a relieving topslide. There is a cam in the topslide that moves the slide in and out in time with the gashes in the hob, via a change gearbox at the other end of the shaft. http://www.lathes.co.uk/hendeyfactory/page2.html

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Arthur.Marks
                            Yeah. At the top of the main manufacturers' page for Tony's site, there is a "new additions" list. I look there from time to time to see what has been updated. The Hendy tour is only a few days? Old.
                            No, the tour has been there at least a year. I wonder what Tony updated?

                            allan

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by TGTool
                              The last picture on the page shows a hob being relieved and I'm curious what the process was. There's no mechanism to advance and retract the tool that I can see. They mention a very low speed so do you suppose they just do tooth by tooth going around the thing? That sound high stress in terms of the start/stop and pretty tedious.
                              A little over over halfway down on the second page, the entire setup is shown.

                              Dave

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