Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

A Waterwheel Tale---

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • sasquatch
    replied
    AND,,,, May i ask,, "WHERE are the guards for that Bench Grinder" ???

    Leave a comment:


  • brian Rupnow
    replied
    So there we have it gentlemen. A short, sweet, succesful project with just enough machining content to make it worth posting.-----Brian

    Leave a comment:


  • brian Rupnow
    replied
    Well its together.-----So far, so good----

    Leave a comment:


  • michigan doug
    replied
    Now that you're going to harvest so much more power, what work are you going to accomplish. Surely you can light a few LED's or something now.

    Maybe one of the old toy steam engine "tools" driven by a belt.


    Finest regards,

    doug

    Leave a comment:


  • sasquatch
    replied
    Not a toad, just a baby in between the frog egg and the grown frog .

    The teeeny tiny one hatches, and starts to grow a tail,, then legs etc, then the tail disappears, and they grow into a frog.

    Very common to see thousands of them , actually black clouds of them in the water when they hatch.

    Leave a comment:


  • brian Rupnow
    replied
    Originally posted by garyphansen
    Also called a tadpole= the stage between an egg and a frog or toad.
    Not to be confused with a Gollywog!!!!

    Leave a comment:


  • garyphansen
    replied
    Also called a tadpole= the stage between an egg and a frog or toad.

    Leave a comment:


  • oil mac
    replied
    For us Brits What is a Pollywog?

    Leave a comment:


  • Paul Alciatore
    replied
    Originally posted by dp
    Carbon fiber is crazy expensive. I enjoy flying radio control rags (http://wildrc.com/), and kites that use modern materials for the bones, and it is astonishing the cost of even very small carbon fiber components. Especially so when it is reduced to dust after a minor crash. More and more I'm using brass tubing splints to mend the broken wings
    But I thought the idea of carbon fiber was it's strength as well as it's lack of weight. ?????

    My model aircraft experience is at least 40 years out of date so all I remember is balsa wood. It was easy to repair, even after the worst crashes. Next day I was in the air again. Sometimes I added steel pins (literally pins as in sewing style pins) for extra strength where needed when splicing the broken balsa wood. Work good: last a long time. Well, a long time in model aircraft years/days anyway.

    The final fate of most of my model aircraft was an inflight explosion when the flames reached the on-board cherry bomb. It's a shame I didn't have a 16 MegaPixel digital camera that took videos back then.

    Leave a comment:


  • DFMiller
    replied
    Originally posted by brian Rupnow
    My local sources for carbon fiber wanted 3 times as much money as I paid for the fiberglass rod.
    Brian,
    I will have to remember that next time I dig into my stock of carbon fiber. I think my daughter is using some of it for Halloween decorations. I shall have to repossess it. I forgot how expensive it is.
    Looking great as usual Brian!
    Dave

    Leave a comment:


  • dp
    replied
    Originally posted by brian Rupnow
    My local sources for carbon fiber wanted 3 times as much money as I paid for the fiberglass rod.
    Carbon fiber is crazy expensive. I enjoy flying radio control rags (http://wildrc.com/), and kites that use modern materials for the bones, and it is astonishing the cost of even very small carbon fiber components. Especially so when it is reduced to dust after a minor crash. More and more I'm using brass tubing splints to mend the broken wings

    Leave a comment:


  • brian Rupnow
    replied
    Originally posted by Hawkeye
    Used carbon arrow shafts would be light and you can probably get them free if you know an archer. Get some glue in inserts they are threaded 8-32.
    I ried to find an archery supply locally, but struck out. I only paid $12.50 for the eight foot length of fiberglass rod.

    Leave a comment:


  • brian Rupnow
    replied
    Originally posted by DFMiller
    Brian,
    Neat looking project. Did you consider using carbon fiber tubing for the shafts? I imagine it would be even lighter.
    Thanks for posting the pictures.
    Dave
    My local sources for carbon fiber wanted 3 times as much money as I paid for the fiberglass rod.

    Leave a comment:


  • brian Rupnow
    replied
    So there we have it----10 new arms and paddles. All I need now is a hub!!!

    Leave a comment:


  • gizmo2
    replied
    Just want to say that I am impressed by the fact you have wild water just running through your property. Here in the high desert of Wyoming, water is hard to come by and worth fighting for... Wells that are just at 300 feet are going dry locally. So it is with great interest that I follow your post!

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X