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Large stationary steam engine fully explained.

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  • Large stationary steam engine fully explained.

    WTH This is really cool so I double posted it:

    This engine was NOT made on a 9" SB lathe by a retiree

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qa3luVezzq4

    See and rejoice 110 year old technology
    Last edited by Forrest Addy; 06-24-2012, 05:15 AM.

  • #2
    Amazing,thanks for posting!
    "Let me recommend the best medicine in the
    world: a long journey, at a mild season, through a pleasant
    country, in easy stages."
    ~ James Madison

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    • #3
      WOW huge!!! Im surprised it was spinning as fast as it was. I just cant imagine actually building,shipping, and assembling that in 1906! (or was it 1916???) I think it would of been neat to see that 40 foot flywheel being poured.

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      • #4
        Amazing piece of machine work!!


        Also amazing what we as humans do to get a drink of water!!

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        • #5
          Large flywheels were usually cast in segments,at least the ones I have seen. I would, however love to see the machining of such a beast. Very interesting video. Bob.

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          • #6
            See also the associated web site:
            http://cincinnatitriplesteam.org/

            Interesting story of caisson "float" problems & solution during construction of the station:
            http://cincinnatitriplesteam.org/rs_construction.htm

            Links to all 3 videos of the engine:
            http://cincinnatitriplesteam.org/GCWW_videos.htm

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            • #7
              Those videos were quite interesting. Nice to see an attempt to preserve stuff like this. One thing I find fascinating is that things like the edges of the crank throws look to polished (see starting about 8:45)to an almost mirror shiny finish. No obvious functional reason to do that, the makers apparently just took pride in what they made.

              Thanks for posting those.

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              • #8
                New favorite website, thanks!
                "The Administration does not support blowing up planets." --- Finally some SENSIBLE policy from the Gov!

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                • #9
                  How does steam at -2 psi pressure move into the second receiver?
                  Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Evan
                    How does steam at -2 psi pressure move into the second receiver?
                    morlocks ..they must have helped out ..

                    its sounds exactly like the morlocks engines .

                    all the best.markj

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Evan
                      How does steam at -2 psi pressure move into the second receiver?
                      They use a vacuum condenser the same as used with the final stage of steam turbines.
                      Jim H.

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                      • #12
                        That still doesn't explain how "negative" pressure is going to be of any use for the third stage. It is called a "triple expansion" engine.
                        Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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                        • #13
                          Of course it does. The negative pressure is gauge pressure. Since the third stage exhausts into the condenser, at -2PSIG, there remains something approaching a -12PSIG differential for expansion in the final stage of expansion as the vacuum condenser is at negative pressure. The higher the vacuum in the condenser, the more efficient the engine system is.
                          Jim H.

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                          • #14
                            I will take your word for it. Some day I will look up how it works. Steam engines are not a major interest of mine.
                            Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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                            • #15
                              How gallant of you. The vacuum condensation principle was used with the very first steam engines. They were called atmospheric engines and used very low pressure steam which was condensed in the cylinder to produce a vacuum to counteract atmospheric pressure.

                              When Googling, start with the Newcomen engine.

                              http://peakengineering.files.wordpre...m-engine-2.jpg
                              Jim H.

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