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Large stationary steam engine fully explained.

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  • mlucek
    replied
    Hmmm, there was a reply here today or yesterday about the Cincinnati Triple Steam engine. I got an email from this thread and now can't find it. Oh well, here's the site :

    Cincinnati Triple Steam - Host for the World's Largest Triple Expansion Steam Engine

    http://cincinnatitriplesteam.org/

    An interview with Larry Moster from the Greater Cincinnati Water Works, GCWW, and Lee Hite with Cincinnati Triple Steam, CTS, at MTTV.

    Weighing in at 1,400 tons these 103 feet high 1,000 h.p. engines are the largest triple expansion crank & flywheel water pumping steam engines ever built. They reside at the Greater Cincinnati Water Works where we invite you to explore a state-of-the-art, high volume, and high quality water pumping system for a growing community in the early 1900s. Part 1 covers the engines and Part 2 covers the water pumps and the process steam generation. Part 3 will cover the construction history for a unique below grade pump house.

    Video:

    World's Largest Triple Expansion Steam Engine
    G C W W Engines Part - 1 (Engine Operations)

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qa3luVezzq4

    G C W W Engines
    Part - 2 (Water pumping components and the production of process steam)

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d-0Ngwn7Ve4

    Introduction Cincinnati Triple Steam

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7-Fr3Rjn8iQ

    Leave a comment:


  • Peter S
    replied
    Originally posted by MrSleepy
    If you come over you should also visit the Allis engines at Kempton (which are also supposed to be the bigest triples itw) Rob
    Rob, to keep the record straight - the Kempton engines were built by Worthington Simpson.

    Leave a comment:


  • Black Forest
    replied
    I hope Brian doesn't see this thread! If so we will be in for a long ride this winter.

    Leave a comment:


  • Fasttrack
    replied
    Originally posted by mlucek
    I don't have any pictures handy, but here's a good page with lots of info:

    http://www.archivingindustry.com/Ind...ontentback.htm


    Mike

    Thanks for the link! Looks like a great page - got it book marked for reading.

    Leave a comment:


  • mlucek
    replied
    Originally posted by Fasttrack
    And I'd LOVE to see some pictures of your steam indicators. Never knew anything about that before this thread... fascinating!
    I don't have any pictures handy, but here's a good page with lots of info:

    http://www.archivingindustry.com/Ind...ontentback.htm

    Still kicking myself for selling another indicator that was in beautiful shape to another guy. Should have kept that one and sold him one of my other ones that wasn't quite so nice

    Wikipedia:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pressure_volume_diagram

    Mike

    Leave a comment:


  • Grind Hard
    replied
    Originally posted by J Tiers
    Boilers are already made into chinese toasters and dollar store goods.....

    The indicators and so forth were used with marine diesel engines also.....

    BAH!

    Leave a comment:


  • MrSleepy
    replied
    Originally posted by mlucek

    Also look at Key Bridge Steam Museum (Britain):

    If you come over you should also visit the Allis engines at Kempton (which are also supposed to be the bigest triples itw)

    http://www.kemptonsteam.org/

    and for shear power the 12000bhp River Don engine.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/River_Don_Engine

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QOBSfdBWSWY

    Rob

    Leave a comment:


  • Fasttrack
    replied
    Originally posted by mlucek
    I too have 3 steam indicators. Very interesting devices. Look like a mad doctor put them together. Such a variety of them too. I would love to see one actually working. One of mine came with a couple of dozen indicator cards with the charts intact. Pretty cool to see the charts just like in the above mentioned book !!

    Also look at Key Bridge Steam Museum (Britain):

    http://www.kbsm.org/

    Engines:

    http://www.kbsm.org/engines

    Be prepared to spend a bit of time on their site. For you folks in England, go see them ! If I ever get back to Britain, that'll be one of my stops


    I'd LOVE to see some of your photos as I find steam engines (especially loco's) endlessly fascinating ! PM me if you like

    Mike

    And I'd LOVE to see some pictures of your steam indicators. Never knew anything about that before this thread... fascinating!

    Leave a comment:


  • mlucek
    replied
    I too have 3 steam indicators. Very interesting devices. Look like a mad doctor put them together. Such a variety of them too. I would love to see one actually working. One of mine came with a couple of dozen indicator cards with the charts intact. Pretty cool to see the charts just like in the above mentioned book !!

    Also look at Kew Bridge Steam Museum (Britain):

    http://www.kbsm.org/

    Engines:

    http://www.kbsm.org/engines

    Be prepared to spend a bit of time on their site. For you folks in England, go see them ! If I ever get back to Britain, that'll be one of my stops

    Originally posted by Grind Bastard
    I've got an archive of B&W stuff like you would not believe, I'd love to get some photos.
    I'd LOVE to see some of your photos as I find steam engines (especially loco's) endlessly fascinating ! PM me if you like

    Mike
    Last edited by mlucek; 06-27-2012, 12:34 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • J Tiers
    replied
    Boilers are already made into chinese toasters and dollar store goods.....

    The indicators and so forth were used with marine diesel engines also.....

    Leave a comment:


  • Grind Hard
    replied
    Are the original boilers still intact? Pre-B&W Sterling Boilers if they are still intact I will have to haul my ass out there. I've got an archive of B&W stuff like you would not believe, I'd love to get some photos.

    Leave a comment:


  • JCHannum
    replied
    Indicators, indicator cards and planimeters are a bit too involved to explain in a hundred words or less. Basically the indicator is a device that measures the pressure in a steam engine cylinder and plots it on a card with respect to piston position. The planimeter is used to measure the area of the generated diagram. They were used, among other things, for tuning the engines, adjusting valve timing, balancing double acting and duplex engines and calculating output.

    I have a Thompson Indicator as well as the Hawkins Indicator Catechism. The indicator is dated 1888, the catechism is the 1903 edition;



    I have a Cosby Swiss manufactured planimeter and an improved Willis Planimeter. These are 1900 or earlier vintage;





    To round things off, I have a Biddle Tachymeter of approximately the same vintage;



    These same instruments were also used with early internal combustion engines as well as air compressors.

    Leave a comment:


  • lugnut
    replied
    Amazing ! I would bet you wouldn't be able to read the start-up/operating manual in one session and get it running. The manual alone would probably out weigh me. Just all that linkage alone would keep someone full time adjusting it. WOW Thanks for sharing.
    Last edited by lugnut; 06-25-2012, 10:30 PM.

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  • Forrest Addy
    replied
    According to theory a triple expansion engine developsd equal powed from every cylinder. Therefore somehow the HP cylinder develops roughy 5000 HP from 165 to 23 PSI, the IP 5000 from 23 PSI to -2 PSI, and the LP from -2 PSI to condenser vacuum (usually 22" Hb or -10.4 PSI).

    Imagine all the energy going up the stack in the 100 years of choo choo train locos and river steam boats.

    This takes us to steam engine indicators, indicator cards, and planimeters. Anyone care to take a cut at it?

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/Rare-Antique...item1c284c0f39

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Planimeter

    And an oddity for the terminally curious:

    http://www.planimetervault.com/hatchet/hatchet.html
    Last edited by Forrest Addy; 06-25-2012, 07:43 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • JCHannum
    replied
    How gallant of you. The vacuum condensation principle was used with the very first steam engines. They were called atmospheric engines and used very low pressure steam which was condensed in the cylinder to produce a vacuum to counteract atmospheric pressure.

    When Googling, start with the Newcomen engine.

    http://peakengineering.files.wordpre...m-engine-2.jpg

    Leave a comment:

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