Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

paper interface

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • paper interface

    Years ago when taking a machine shop course the instructor recomended a strip of paper such as paper towel or regular butcher paper between the table and the work clamped to the table. I have never seen this mentioned in texts. Do people follow this practice and does it protect the table or make a better grip?

  • #2
    Some people do.--- and it supposedly does give a better grip.
    Brian Rupnow
    Design engineer
    Barrie, Ontario, Canada

    Comment


    • #3
      I often use paper, or masking tape as well as pvc electrical tape when clamping gun parts to machine. My purpose is to protect the surface of blued items and allow me to hold the part tight without marring.

      Cheers
      Mac.

      Comment


      • #4
        FWIW, I have a piece of brown paper bag between the bottom of my quick-change toolholder and my lathe compound, it increases the friction and helps keep it from rotating against a heavy cut....

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Hobbyman
          Years ago when taking a machine shop course the instructor recomended a strip of paper such as paper towel or regular butcher paper between the table and the work clamped to the table. I have never seen this mentioned in texts. Do people follow this practice and does it protect the table or make a better grip?
          Newspaper will do as well.

          Putting it under a machine vise or a part on a machine table reduces the need that some see to be heavy-handed with a tee-bolt, vise handle and/or spanners on t-bolts etc.

          I use masking tape for the same reasons as well.

          A machine stop against the vise and the job is even better.

          In the unlikely event that any one even attemted let alone actually did use a "cheater" or a hammer on a vise handle or t-bolts etc they'd be straight out of the shop never to return - with their unfinished part/s and any tools they might have brought with them - particularly so as if in the unlikely event I let anyone use my tools or machines, that is one of the conditions of using them that has to be agreed to.
          Last edited by oldtiffie; 07-07-2012, 02:21 AM.

          Comment


          • #6
            Yup papr is good. Protects finishes. Better fixation. Slight compliance. I used acres of it over the years. I like IBMcards (am I dating myself?) a lot back when. Gasket material. Copper sheet and insulated wire from the motor shop. cloth inserted rubber. Alunimun in various forms. These materials I used as shim, protection, or whatever.

            It's seldom I placed anything directly on a machine table.

            Comment


            • #7
              I always recommend using non clay impregnated paper,such as brown paper bag or newspaper to get a much better grip on metals. Been doing it for decades.

              Comment


              • #8
                More for the chorus...... The small mill here has a table that was surface ground.... quite smooth. Paper gives a grip that prevents the sliding which might occur otherwise (and has).
                CNC machines only go through the motions.

                Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
                Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
                Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
                I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
                Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I too have used paper to improve grip because I read it worked somewhere, and it did. The one question I had about it's use was the consistency of it's thickness and effect on precision. Is paper generally considered to be fairly consistent in thickness?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Can you still knock something down in the vice if you have paper between it ..as I don't have a kurt .

                    all the best.markj

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Thank you for the response.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I've seen strips of paper used at various points to verify a part being clamped evenly on a table. When clapmed the papers are tugged to see that the part didn't 'rise' from clamp or flex.
                        And paper between clamp and finished surface to avoid maring the surface.
                        Krutch


                        Mentally confused and prone to wandering!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          using it for protection of a surface makes sense....but for added grip.... the odd thing is coefficient of friction between paper and steel is 1/2 of that between steel and cast iron. CF on steel/steel is double that again....so what does this work? we all know surface area in contact isn't supposed to matter
                          Last edited by Mcgyver; 07-07-2012, 04:55 PM.
                          in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Speculation

                            Pure speculation on my part but it seems to me that the paper fibres may be getting squeezed into the machining marks of each piece and thereby getting a better grip ??

                            Comment

                            Working...
                            X