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  • Name this item!

    Time for another exiting fun filled round of name this item! Hint, it's heavy 45#, it precision, it's from the USAF(so cost millions) & it from a fellow member. The round disc on top rotates. If nothing else it could become the ultimate benchrest mount ot a 360 degree truck mount for a Browning 1917 water cooled. As it is very cool all in itself an fits well with the huge collection of wonderful stuff my wife doesn't have a clue why I cherish. I bet no other kid on my block(4 miles & 8 houses) have one of these.
    Let the guessing begin & the best man win! 1st possitive ID wind dinner at Johns home in Knottingham,just call 1st! Game On!


  • #2
    Looks like a precision load cell as used to weigh aircraft. It takes just three of them to do that.

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    • #3
      Re: Dinner at Johns:

      Umm, who is cooking?

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      • #4
        It says on it that it is a flatness tester.

        See here for description:

        http://books.google.ca/books?id=iwcM...tester&f=false
        Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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        • #5
          An interferometer.
          Location: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

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          • #6
            To be precise, it is the base plate of the interferometer.
            Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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            • #7
              Some gameshow host, he posts here then takes off without running the show, or telling us who the winner is!!

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              • #8
                I don't think we have a winner just yet.

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                • #9
                  Well, based on your other Photobucket pictures, it has to be a turntable for a four-leaf clover eating German Shepherd.........(am I close?)

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                  • #10
                    Did you see the 5 leaf clover. Laugh if you want but yesterday after 7 years of working for the mental health dept my wife got a full time position, double income, insurance,benny's, 401, etc,etc. Only the 3rd opening in 7 years.
                    Anyone wanna buy a clover?


                    Originally posted by Pherdie
                    Well, based on your other Photobucket pictures, it has to be a turntable for a four-leaf clover eating German Shepherd.........(am I close?)

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Evan
                      To be precise, it is the base plate of the interferometer.
                      Evan,the link was bad. If that's really what it is can you explain it in simple terms? If not you got me. Also what shop application does it have? It's very heavy, precise & adjustable. Thanks!

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                      • #12
                        were those pictures of your shop in your photobucket?

                        if not u should post some pictures
                        https://www.flickr.com/photos/csprecision

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by flylo
                          Time for another exiting fun filled round of name this item!
                          Bob, if you were down South I'd suggest Bubba.


                          .
                          Last edited by ; 07-07-2012, 01:28 AM.

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                          • #14
                            The interferometer shines monochromatic light on the test object which has applied to it an optical flat. The test object might be a Johansson Block that needs calibration. Wrung to the block is a flatness standard made of polished quartz. It is transparent and the light passes through the standard and reflects from the test article. The light that is reflected will interfere with the original transmitted beam. The interference will cause bright and dark bands the spacing of which depends on the distance and the change in distance per unit of separation on the test article.

                            This can be used to determine the flatness of the test article to values that are a fraction of the wavelength of the colour of light used. For example, in my telescope the secondary mirror needs to be flat to within a tenth of a wavelength of green light across the entire 2.5" surface.

                            The base plate which you have there is intended to allow the test article to be mounted on the top and is designed to allow it to be rotated through 180 degrees without changing the distance of the article from the light source. It has extremely precise bearings and your estimate of the value probably isn't that far off.
                            Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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                            • #15
                              The object to be tested fro flatness on the optical flat (the reference) must be "wedged" and not wrung hard down on the optical flat.

                              Light loses half a wave-length when it is reflected and so when the original and reflected beam are half a wave-length apart a black line is shown.

                              The distance between lines is one wave length - along the axis of the wedge - and for straightness along it.

                              http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Optical_flat

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