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  • rohart
    replied
    I surmise from an earlier post that you're on my side of the pond. If you're prepared to buy something from MSC/J&L, they send you a catalogue pretty sharpish, as soon as you've bought anythoing, I find. There are many pages of photos of inserts in the catalogu, and it would at least let you identify what you wanted, before finding a cheaper source.

    I know they're pricy, but they're reliable and quick, and have high quality gear.

    Leave a comment:


  • Arthur.Marks
    replied
    http://img692.imageshack.us/img692/5...menclature.pdf
    Look on the second page of the link (page "5" in the actual document). There is a visual representation. It is the length of a single straight section.

    Leave a comment:


  • beanbag
    replied
    I dunno, but I think you'd be better off using geometry to find the inscribed circle size (or just hold a drill of the right diameter up to it) and go with the ansi number.

    Also, when you are measuring the cutting edge length, you are assuming that there is no tip radius, right?

    edit: The inscribed circle is defined at the top of the insert, not the bottom mounting surface.
    Last edited by beanbag; 07-15-2012, 05:53 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • john11668
    replied
    Just to clarify
    If you are looking at the Size designation for "metric cutting edge length" on a Trigon insert what measurement would you take ?

    Leave a comment:


  • michigan doug
    replied
    Glad you got good information finally.

    Ignore the pickleheads.

    Now I find them more entertaining than anything else.

    I'm not suggesting you do the following activity on this forum, but I can tell you that troll baiting is a pretty fun sport. Kind of turn the tables on the pickleheads if you will.

    Finest regards,

    doug

    Leave a comment:


  • john11668
    replied
    Thanks for that Alistair.
    I am a member of many forums and I have to say that sort of behaviour is not uncommon. (There is always one ) So apart from an initial catty reply, I took it with a pinch of salt. If it had gone on I would have lapsed into a tirade but that wouldn't really have achieved anything other than entertained the rest of the group.

    I have been here long enough to recognise that it is not the norm.
    I can understand the desire to hear things called by their proper name but in much of the UK (and certainly my part) the name tips is commonly used in that context.

    We are after all a home shop forum rather than one solely for professional engineers, so silly questions will crop up from time to time. I didn't think my own question was actually silly, just about an area in which I had no direct experience. Now I am much better informed thank you.

    I find that in general , Engineers do wish to help other engineers, but occasionally you get one who has to make his point.
    I suspect he was moderated for it (which is good). Hopefully forum members will continue to rein in those with such tendencies. Save the moderators from having to wield the big stick

    Leave a comment:


  • Alistair Hosie
    replied
    Mr Midget your manners need tidying your very childish attempt to ridicule John does you no good. I for one welcome him here and we did indeed ALL know exactly what he meant ,if you struggled with it then so be it but beligerent statements towards newcomers is not the way we should run this site in MY opinion sorry.
    WECOME JOHN
    and a heart Welcome at that.
    Keep em coming. Alistair

    Leave a comment:


  • john11668
    replied
    I dont bore aluminium often!
    Last time I actually used one of the D'andrea boring bars in the tool post of the lathe while making a multi pulley for the Milling machine.
    An occasional squirt of releasing oil seemed to keep it cutting sweetly.

    Many thanks to all the helpful contributors .
    I think I now have a bit of a grasp

    Leave a comment:


  • beanbag
    replied
    Originally posted by john11668
    So why do metric inserts have an imperial thickness?
    The ANSI and ISO designations are interchangeable, thus your inserts are ALSO called 0902=1.81.5(radius) and 1103=22(radius), so you can search under those terms as well.

    Are you sure you are measuring inscribed circle?

    So as I understand it any inserts commencing with TPxx provided I get screws to suit and 1103 and 09T3 give me the required sizes, and if I get them suitable for mild steel they will probably do for cast iron or Aluminium (with care )
    No, it will probably suck for aluminum.

    Leave a comment:


  • Arthur.Marks
    replied
    Yes---with one caveat. The distributor's insert designation previously provided for the "09" size does not match. You can use any inserts with the following:
    TP_ _ 1103
    TP_ _ 0902


    So... In other words, just order what you want from this page that matches the above designation: Maritool

    Leave a comment:


  • john11668
    replied
    The 03 ties up at 1/8" for the 11mm insert
    The 9mm insert measures 3/32" so I presume your 5/32 was a typo (forgiven).
    Screws are M3.5 x 0.5 and M2.5 x 0.45 as far as I can make out with crappy eastern thread gauges.

    So why do metric inserts have an imperial thickness?
    So as I understand it any inserts commencing with TPxx provided I get screws to suit and 1103 and 09T3 give me the required sizes, and if I get them suitable for mild steel they will probably do for cast iron or Aluminium (with care )

    Leave a comment:


  • Arthur.Marks
    replied
    Double check the thicknesses I listed match your inserts... (T3 or, alternately, 03 = thickness of the insert. "T3" = 5/32" thickness. "03" = 1/8" thickness). The larger one is easy enough to find, but the smaller one is a combination that is unusual. Rather than being 0.156" thick, the normal combination is .094" thickness. This is referring to the TPG_09T3 listing. There are plenty to be had in TPG_0902 size.

    For the time being, this one should work for you and is available in single quantities... TPGH110302L

    Leave a comment:


  • beanbag
    replied
    My guess is that your screws are metric pitch. You can always go with TPGT inserts that take a screw with a 60 deg countersink like these:

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/10-Pieces-TH...item5d32fc4427

    I know that it looks like these screws barely hold on the insert, but the insert is mainly supported by the pocket of the holder, and the screw provides some centering, but mainly clamping.

    Leave a comment:


  • john11668
    replied
    Will have a go with thead gauges (and eyeglass) tomorrow

    Leave a comment:


  • Arthur.Marks
    replied
    Originally posted by john11668
    The screw would seem to be an odd configuration, shallow csk, almost flat head. Could this be the reason for the X designation.?

    If so does it just mean that if I change to a different (more readily available) (maybe cheaper) insert then I will just have to change the screw too.
    Yes and yes. That screw is not standard---but I can make a very good guess why it is like that. With a standard c'sunk screw, the Torx socket is either not very deep or a smaller size than ideal. Having the cylindrical portion above the c'sink allows a larger Torx size and deeper engagement. This can go a long way to not having the problem of stripping the head of your screw. It also provides the self-centering ability by retaining the countersink angle.

    To find a replacement screw, you'll need to identify the one you have. i.e. thread sizes as small down as #4-40tpi are not uncommon.

    Leave a comment:

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