Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Old Oil: NO! But What About Old AntiFreeze?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Old Oil: NO! But What About Old AntiFreeze?

    You may have guessed by now, I am cleaning out my garage and discovering things from past decades. All part of my new shop project: see my thread on this.

    So my old oil will not be used in vehicles. But what about an unopened gallon of antifreeze? It is Prestone: green stuff. Still has the factory seal (and a lot of dirt on the outside), but again between 10 and 20 years old. My truck has yellow stuff, not sure of the brand as I had a shop take care of it in Iowa.

    I know it is green antifreeze because it has a transparent area for judging the level in the jug.

    So should it be OK? And if so, will it mix OK with the yellow stuff? Or do I just chuck it? I can't think of any other uses for antifreeze.
    Last edited by Paul Alciatore; 07-08-2012, 10:12 PM.
    Paul A.
    SE Texas

    And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
    You will find that it has discrete steps.

  • #2
    Paul not sure if it is compatible with the yellow or even pink stuff, one of then , the green i think is NOT to be used in Aluminum engines??
    Someone here will verify that i'm sure.

    As far as it still being safe to use in cold weather, i'd bet it is still good.

    (Now what else have you got stored away there? -Hopefully NOT any old dynamite!!)

    Comment


    • #3
      Freon??? Any R 12, by chance??????????

      I'll pick up the UPS charges.

      --G

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Paul Alciatore
        So should it be OK? And if so, will it mix OK with the yellow stuff? Or do I just chuck it? I can't think of any other uses for antifreeze.
        My understanding is that it is not to be mixed with the long life yellow or orange anti-freeze. However there was a recent thread about using it in place of coolant.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Guido
          Freon??? Any R 12, by chance??????????

          I'll pick up the UPS charges.

          --G
          Freon?? I was talking about antifreeze, not Freon.

          But who knows, I may find a can or two. What's it worth?
          Paul A.
          SE Texas

          And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
          You will find that it has discrete steps.

          Comment


          • #6
            I drained and refilled the Land Rover cooling system in about 1977. It doesn't leak at all and it has never been refilled since then. The anti-freeze is still bright green and it doesn't freeze in winter even at minus 43 like last winter. I'd say it's good for a while in storage.
            Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

            Comment


            • #7
              You can use a voltmeter to test antifreeze for it's anti-corrosion ability. http://www.wmsbrg.com/cadillac/Richm...your%20car.htm and http://www.rondavisradiators.com/tech.htm

              This site goes into it a little more. http://www.dieselduck.ca/machine/01%...nt_voltage.htm
              Location: Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada

              Comment


              • #8
                Not too acidic?

                Originally posted by Paul Alciatore
                But what about an unopened gallon of antifreeze? It is Prestone: green stuff.
                Fresh ethylene glycol is pretty alkaline outta the bottle, like pH 10.5 or so. You mix it with water and the pH drops to like 9 or so in the engine.

                Breakdown is by eating hydroxyl radicals so it gets more acidic as it ages. Supposedly you can measure this in antifreeze thats been in a car a long time. Perhaps your ancient antifreeze might have broken down and become more acidic? Supposedly if the pH in an old fashioned car gets below 8 or so, stuff starts corroding and dissolving.

                How does an average joe measure pH? I donno. Ask a friendly local chemist who can probably use a meter in a couple minutes. A decent pH meter is kinda expensive and easy to break, and once you've contaminated it with ethyl glycol they can't use it for food testing, so your local chemist buddy will want to test it himself.

                You can see why alkaline ethyl glycol (the green stuff) is so great for steel engine blocks, not so good for aluminum blocks. I bet you could dissolve yourself a head gasket leak in an aluminum block in just a couple months with the green stuff, if not worse. The other colors, for aluminum engines, are a totally different chemical technology and are vaguely acidic. Aluminum and acid get along pretty well, lots better than steel and acid anyway. As you can see, engines that combine metals are not just an electrochemical nightmare, but a corrosion issue too.

                Its pretty photochemically stable, so if sunlight hasn't rotted the bottle away, whats in it is almost certainly good.

                If it were not so freaking toxic you could just boil some and see the boiling temp, but the fumes are bad for you, so...

                Other than being toxic to animals, bacteria and stuff like to eat it, so any leaks or whatever are eaten up by bacteria in a couple days/weeks. My point being that its probably concentrated enough not to break down (just like strong enough salt preserves food) but it is possible to be broken down by bacteria and stuff.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by vincemulhollon
                  How does an average joe measure pH? I donno.
                  You buy a pH test kit at a pool supply store.

                  It's probably fine, but it's not so expensive that you're out big money to recycle it. I would not mix it with any other color coolant - which is why I think they use different colors. It's fine in systems with aluminum components. What you use in a mixed system is distilled water, not tap. And change the coolant every two years like clockwork.
                  Chris
                  Merkel, Tx
                  http://raceabilene.com/kelly/hotrod

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Evan
                    I drained and refilled the Land Rover cooling system in about 1977. It doesn't leak at all and it has never been refilled since then. The anti-freeze is still bright green and it doesn't freeze in winter even at minus 43 like last winter. I'd say it's good for a while in storage.
                    Evan, if I were you I would change it again. Let me give you an example of why. Some yrs. ago my mother purchased a 15 yr. old Olds 98, low milage, pristine condition, had always been shedded. The coolant looked great so we left it alone, before it was all over we had replaced almost every freeze plug in the block, they pinholed from the inside out. I am firmly convinced if we had changed out the coolant, we would have avoided a lot of labor. I know on some heavy equipment they test, and then replace the ant-corrosion additives if needed.
                    James

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      google "Zerex coolant chart"

                      ...for compatibility

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        There is still green heavy duty antifreeze available that is aluminum compatible.......that said antifreeze is usually rated by time/mileage, it's probably still ok but I would get it tested.
                        Opportunity knocks once, temptation leans on the doorbell.....

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Coolants should not be mixed. The car manufactures used diffferently designed seals and materials for the coolant called for. The wrong coolant is not compatable w the seals and may cause leaks down the road.

                          Comment

                          Working...
                          X