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  • Chamber dimensions

    Can onyone in the group direct me to a location where I can find the factory dimensions to chamber for a .22 cal Long Rifle cartridge. I have searched the web high and low and can't seem to locate any info.

  • #2
    See here:

    http://www.bellmtcs.com/FAQ/ChamberThroats101.htm
    Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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    • #3
      From what I've seen, there is a lot of difference of opinion---each manufacturer seems to set their own standards. Try the SAAMI website.

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      • #4
        I didn't find much in this area on the SAAMI site. I mik'd some of the different brands of .22LR I have and I was kind of surprised about the differences in the specs from one manufacture to the next.

        If you are making a fire arm, don't!

        Jerry

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        • #5
          It is interesting that the Roy Dunlap gunsmithing book has many chamber dimensions. He said there was not a standard for the .22 Long Rifle. The book was first published in 1950, and that may have changed, but probably not.
          Jim H.

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          • #6
            There is a lot of variation depending on the ammunition and the intended use of the firearm. For a bolt action match rifle the chamber is made a almost tight fit to the cartridge with a slight taper toward the front. The bullet nose should slightly engage the rifling when seated in the chamber. For a general use weapon that will be expected to reliably fire whatever ammo is available the chamber will be a fairly loose fit to prevent jamming. This is especially important for a semi auto weapon like the Ruger 10/22, my favorite 22LR rifle.
            Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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            • #7
              For reliable chambering of match ammo in semi auto guns, use the Bentz reamer. This provides less body taper and 1-1/2* throat angle. It also has a shorter throat causing the bullet to engrave on the rifling slightly.
              The standard match reamer has a 5* throat angle, increased body taper and shorter throat to engrave rifling.
              Do not use match reamers with standard velocity or selected ammo.
              This information from Clymer.
              Jim H.

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              • #8
                Evan is correct (as usuall), I believe a bentz reamer is a semi -match reamer for semi-autos. At least that is what I use mine for.

                Some custom 10-22 makers will or used to make barrels with real match chambers, some would only fit a specific make of ammo. From what I've read some guns would not even extract unfired rounds, you had to fire the gun to clear it!

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                • #9
                  JCHannum and Evan got the straight poop. I am going to use the Clymer with 5 deg angle throat. This gun needs to eat an assortment of cheap ammo so I'm going to leave the chamber a little on the loose side. I try to stay away from Remington ammo because their brass seems alot softer than Wincheter. ATF has given a letter of approval on the gun, of course it can't be sold unless I get a manufactures's license and conform the their regulations.

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                  • #10
                    Shot by me with my aging eyeballs with .22 inch No 8 Lee Enfield. I used to instruct Sea Cadets before the Canadian government decided that it was not politically correct for young potential armed forces recruits to learn how to handle a firearm. !!!!!

                    Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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                    • #11
                      Evan
                      Were you drunk at the time Evan - tell us it ain't so. Jesus, my sister shoots better than that!

                      Oh, wait those are each 10 shot groups right?

                      [This message has been edited by Thrud (edited 03-01-2004).]

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                      • #12
                        Iron sights and I can't see the front and rear sight at the same time. There are four bulls in there, score 84. Rebarreled Lee Enfield.
                        Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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                        • #13
                          Thats not bad for an enfield trainer,they aren't very accurate. Mine is the most INacurrate rimfire I own, including cooeys.

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