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What Am I Missing? A Scriber Question.

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  • What Am I Missing? A Scriber Question.

    I currently have a 10" height gage and is works well for my needs. I can see eventually needing a gage with a longer/higher scale. So, looking around at what is available used, I see a lot of gages that look really nice, but they are missing the scriber. Height gage scribers listed separately for sale are very scarce. Are the scribers being re-purposed on other tools or equipment and never make it back to the height gage?
    Cheers,
    Gary

  • #2
    Why not just make your own, if you want to get fancy solder a piece of carbide on for the scratcher .

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    • #3
      Originally posted by gcude
      Are the scribers being re-purposed on other tools or equipment and never make it back to the height gage?
      More likely the gage is being used with a DTI and the scriber is taken off for that.

      As you probably are aware, anything not (or no longer) attached physically is quickly lost.... even if the device has a case and a place in it for the part. Apparently everyone sets parts down on the bench instead of back in the case, after which they eventually become scrap, or are scooped up and tossed into the "I dunno" drawer.
      1601

      Keep eye on ball.
      Hashim Khan

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      • #4
        Which brand & model height gauge do you have? There are some nice complete height gauges out there for short money that would be cheaper than trying to find (or make?) a scriber .

        I got a Brown & Sharpe 18" vernier height gauge, in it's original wooden case and with the scriber, for $65 and (I believe) $15.45 in shipping. Best $80 I've spent in some time now.

        I think when you see the scriber missing it's a case of the height gauge having been used primarily with a dial test indicator and the scriber is sitting unrecognized in a toolbox drawer....somewhere.

        Where have you been looking? There seems to be a few on Ebay, but you have to be careful in searching. Many are just categorized wrong.

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        • #5
          Scribers are easily made of tool steel flat stock. While it's nice that the gage reads 0.000" with the scribe referenced to the base plane it's not really necessary. If you know where you start the graduations of th height gage will offset from there to where you want to go.

          When I was in layout a height gage was my most used tool nut the scribes we used were all over the map. Nothing referenced to nothing to neat nominal figures. My indexer height was XX.23" with my short scribe and x.x31 with the long. We had shop made scribes up to 20" long so we could reach far into castings to layout a setscrew hole location or for a gage connection. A note pad and pencil were inseparable parts of the equipment.

          There's nothing sacred about a height gage scribe except it has to be relatively straingt and parallel and the scratchy part has a chisel edge. Carbide is nice but hard steel works too.
          Last edited by Forrest Addy; 07-15-2012, 01:28 PM.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by gcude
            Are the scribers being re-purposed on other tools or equipment and never make it back to the height gage?
            Like Jerry says, they come with a scriber, but in a commercial setting they're often purchased with an assortment of scribers of various widths/lengths, dovetail connectors for DTI's and gauge heads, etc.

            I always seem to run across big boxes of ruby-tipped CMM probes at auction -- someone with a CMM somewhere is sad
            "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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            • #7
              Get a digital height guage and you can reference anything (scriber edges included) to anything else (job parts or slip guages etc.) just by putting the scriber or what-ever else onto or where-ever you want it and pressing the "zero" button - just as you would with a digital caliper or micrometer.

              https://www.machineryhouse.com.au/Q2106
              Last edited by oldtiffie; 07-15-2012, 09:02 PM.

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