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  • Anvil question

    I went to a garage sale on Saturday and bought an Anvil for $15 There were a couple of women selling the stuff and they probably didn't know what it was. I am no anvil expert but it looks like a good one and weighs about 100#. It has a laminated steel top that is in very good condition. I think it is a farriers anvil but I'm not sure. Can someone here give me some incite on this anvil,

    Mark Hockett

  • #2
    More like a tinner's anvil. The square hole is for accessory forms and the sharp horn for shaping. Great buy for $15. These usually go for around $150+ when you can find them.

    Forgot to ask: Are there any maker marks on it? Some are quite collectible and the value can triple.
    Last edited by CCWKen; 07-16-2012, 01:23 AM.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Mark Hockett
      I went to a garage sale on Saturday and bought an Anvil for $15
      Wow - that looks like it's never witnessed a hammer fall!

      I agree it looks modern farrier but that is also a matter of usage and location whether a farrier would use it. It has a lot of good visual features so if it isn't grey iron under the hood it should be a decent too. It needs to be hit!

      Damn good price, too. Gloat on!

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      • #4
        $15 - that is one great score!!!

        In Australia used anvils go for $3-$5 a lb! To make matters worse there's a guy around my neck of the woods who collects anvil and has over 1000 of them in his back garden and shed. He seems to be able to sniff them out faster than anyone else. He never sells any of them and doesn't use any of them either! It took me 4 years to find one and I had to go 200 miles to get it!

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Mark Hockett
          I went to a garage sale on Saturday and bought an Anvil for $15 There were a couple of women selling the stuff and they probably didn't know what it was. I am no anvil expert but it looks like a good one and weighs about 100#. It has a laminated steel top that is in very good condition. I think it is a farriers anvil but I'm not sure. Can someone here give me some incite on this anvil,


          Hardie hole, pritchel hole and a flat area behind the bick, looks like a London pattern Anivil to me.

          Almost exactly the same shape as my Anvil, a Peterbilt as I recall although quite a bit smaller and in better condition.
          Paul Compton
          www.morini-mania.co.uk
          http://www.youtube.com/user/EVguru

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          • #6
            Looks to be an incredible buy. Tough to find a decent anvil for $1/pound, not to mention one in fantastic shape.

            I'd love to see more closeups of the faces and if there are any identifying marks.
            Most Peter Wrights have flats across tops of the ends of the feet, I'm having a hard time seeing them.
            My first guesses might be ARM & Hammer or Hay Budden.......
            Last edited by T.Hoffman; 07-16-2012, 08:44 AM.

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            • #7
              You can see the seam where the tool steel top is welded on. It looks like a normal,good quality old anvil,not just cast iron. Never saw a cast iron one that had a decent shape anyway.

              The main problem is grinding the top and horn flat of the terrible rust. That will take some work.

              I ground my lightly used anvil nice and smooth with blue belts in my hand held belt sander. Rather a messy chore,where you're going to get plenty of rusty dust on you. I did mine next to an exhaust fan and still got plenty of iron dust on me. If you have an old belt sander that you could just save for metal it would be good. Otherwise later on on a wood project,you may find your wood with numerous blue spots on it when you finally put water based stain on it. This from tiny bits of iron dust falling out of the sander.

              Start out with 36 grit if possible. Finish with 220 grit blue zirconia belts. They cut a lot faster,and you will need all the help you can get to grind that anvil smooth.

              If there is a blanchard grinder in your area,you could get it blanchard ground. Would be a big help.

              I wouldn't do any heavy hammering out in the hardie hole area. The anvil looks pretty thinly tapered out there. Hammer over the thick,deep area where the feet are. Just do hot or cold cutting with the hardie hole area.

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              • #8
                I think it's was mainly used for dropping on road runners from very high cliffs. It would usually temporarily flatten them but never kill them or enable their capture so they went out of use.
                I'm an abstract poet and I didn't even think I was.

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                • #9
                  A good wire brushing on a drill will take a lot of the rust off.
                  You can use like a 60 or 80 grit flap wheel on the face if you think it needs to be smoothed out more.
                  That anvil looks to be in prime shape, and other than some surface rust I think it looks beautiful.

                  Also, once you wire brush the anvil I have used a CLR scrub down followed by a thorough water rinse. Dry right away and apply some rust inhibitor.
                  Last edited by T.Hoffman; 07-16-2012, 10:03 AM.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Mark Hockett
                    I think it is a farriers anvil but I'm not sure. Can someone here give me some incite on this anvil
                    Agree with Ken, that looks like a tinner's anvil. Farrier's anvil has very curved horn.

                    Hollis will be able to tell you exactly what it is by a glance , but London Pattern, with a laminated top (assuming it's American), I'd guess Hay-Budden.
                    "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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                    • #11
                      If we could get a peek at the underside of the heel area- that might tell something too.
                      Arm & Hammer's have noticeable stepped ledges as the heel was pounded on the steam hammers.
                      They made no effort to clean up cosmetic look of the underside.

                      I have two A&H's, one 225# and one 527#, and both have that feature.
                      If it has those steps on the underside- probably a A&H. If not, leaning towards a HB.
                      I've read that A&H's stampings were not very deep, and many of them have become unreadable since manufacturing.
                      Last edited by T.Hoffman; 07-16-2012, 11:53 AM.

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                      • #12
                        Here's my larger A&H heel underside showing stepped ledges from steam hammer pounding and forming.
                        If the underside of the heel has something that resembles this, probably A&H:

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by T.Hoffman
                          I have two A&H's, one 225# and one 527#, and both have that feature.

                          That's a hell of an anvil; don't think I've ever seen one that big before. Seems like the ones I'm used to range from 100 - 300 lbs.

                          Mark - I'm jealous. $15 is ridiculously cheap.

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                          • #14
                            Thats a great find, 100#, just the right size for most common "hobby" work.
                            Suggest that you take your question, with pictures to http://www.iforgeiron.com/
                            There is a discussion thread dedicated to anvils, Also look closley on the sides for any identifying numbers or letters, that will help ID your anvil.

                            Joe B

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                            • #15
                              I will get it cleaned up in the next week or so and try to find any identification marks. Thanks for all the input.
                              Mark Hockett

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