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OT: 155mm supressors for tanks

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  • OT: 155mm supressors for tanks




    http://www.ww2incolor.com/forum/show...lery-silencer-!!

  • #2
    Interesting, but I don't see the point. It's my understanding that one of the keys to survivability of a tank or mobile artillery today is the ability to fire and move quickly so that return fire doesn't destroy you. Most advanced nations have the technology to track where the incoming fire originated. It appears to me that those silencers would be unwieldy and difficult to move and set up quickly.

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    • #3
      My understanding was that the test facility was too close to the neighbors. And got noise complaints so just put another mill in the budget for silencers.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by firbikrhd1
        Most advanced nations have the technology to track where the incoming fire originated.
        For at least 20 years! I was a young buck out of college working on the Tacfire counter-battery system. Core memory

        That's why those 155's fire up to 6 rounds at the same target with different elevation so they all land on target simultaneously (the MRSI system) and then get the hell out of dodge.
        "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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        • #5
          Originally posted by lazlo
          For at least 20 years! I was a young buck out of college working on the Tacfire counter-battery system. Core memory

          That's why those 155's fire up to 6 rounds at the same target with different elevation so they all land on target simultaneously (the MRSI system) and then get the hell out of dodge.
          doesn't that mean they can only hit two rounds simultaneously?

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Elninio
            doesn't that mean they can only hit two rounds simultaneously?
            They shoot the maximum elevation, then 2 - 5 more shots, each depressing the elevation so the final shot is nearly line of sight. All the rounds hit simultaneously.
            Considering that the crew hand-loads a shell, tosses in the powder charges (what look like sticks of dynamite), and hydraulically rams each shot, it takes a huge amount of skill.

            I've watched this many times on a remote battery camera: when all the rounds land it's friggin' crazy. When multiple howitzers do it, it's insane.
            Last edited by lazlo; 07-17-2012, 09:45 PM.
            "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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            • #7
              Originally posted by lazlo
              They shoot the maximum elevation, then 2 - 5 more shots, each depressing the elevation so the final shot is nearly line of sight. All the rounds hit simultaneously.
              Considering that the crew hand-loads a shell, tosses in the powder charges (what look like sticks of dynamite), and hydraulically rams each shot, it takes a huge amount of skill.

              I've watched this many times on a remote battery camera: when all the rounds land it's friggin' crazy. When multiple howitzers do it, it's insane.
              Ahh i was wondering how they did it.... Firing the same power loads at multiple elevations and the rounds travel different distances..... Change the load and you change the velocity meaning you can do that...
              Precision takes time.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by lazlo
                Considering that the crew hand-loads a shell, tosses in the powder charges (what look like sticks of dynamite), and hydraulically rams each shot, it takes a huge amount of skill.
                Most of the newer systems that do this have auto loaders. Hand loading is to slow to make it happen properly.
                The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

                Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

                Southwestern Ontario. Canada

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by loose nut
                  Most of the newer systems that do this have auto loaders.
                  The 155 howitzer's don't have them for the same reason tanks don't have auto-loaders: takes too much space, too unreliable.

                  Like an M1 tank, the Paladin crew consists of the commander, driver, gunner and ammunition loader.
                  "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

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                  • #10
                    Lots of 155's have auto loaders, the new German and Swedish (two man crew, driver and gunner) ones for example, just not the US Paladin. Many modern tanks have auto loaders also, the M1 doesn't. Burst fire on a howitzer is highly desirable but not so much on a tank, the loader can reload (3 to 5 seconds) while the gunner acquires a new target.

                    The old Soviet army joke was that the sopranos in the soviet army choir where T-72 gunners, the auto loaders had a tendency to rip body parts off. Guess which ones.
                    The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

                    Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

                    Southwestern Ontario. Canada

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