Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

So I am getting ready to buy stuff for my mill, initial setup type stuff....

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • So I am getting ready to buy stuff for my mill, initial setup type stuff....

    All I have is a VFD to make it run, a Harding spin indexer, a vise and a few HSS endmills (nothing special...)

    What would you buy to get set up? I have about $600 cash to get started.

    I have been looking at CDCO cause they seem to be very reasonable and they ship COD...

    I know I need end mill holders...Do I need collets if I have end mill holders?

    What about parellels? 1/8? 1/4?? wavy??

    Angle clamps? 1-2-3 blocks?

    Give me some direction, so as to not waste my money on items I may not need...

  • #2
    Get a small vice, a T-slot hold-down kit, some 1-2-3 blocks, a set of parallels and some basic collets and a drill-chuck.

    Use the rest to buy end-mills, a set of calipers if you don't have 'em and an edge-finder.
    "The Administration does not support blowing up planets." --- Finally some SENSIBLE policy from the Gov!

    Comment


    • #3
      I should mention I am pretty set up for a lathe...

      Edge finder, would never have thought of that.

      Comment


      • #4
        TWO t-slot hold down kits

        Comment


        • #5
          While two is useful, I would not consider that a first-purchase priority. One set definitely is; two is not. I agree with most above points: edge finder¹, some sort of vise, parallel set², collets³, one set screw end mill holder⁴, 1-2-3 block set⁵. Don't get into the angle stuff. A protractor will accomplish just about all of that stuff just as well, and you probably already own one. Nothing says you can't set a protractor and position your work with it against the vise bed while closing the vise. What little trouble that is against the convenience of pulling out a single angle block is more than made up by the infrequency such an operation is performed. Save your money for good cutting tools. I think a lot of people get pulled into the tooling game as primary and let the actual cutting tools fall as they may. That's backwards, IMO. No need to go crazy with all sorts of different diameters of end mill sizes. Most useful will likely be three sizes---maybe 3/8", 1/2" and 3/4"---paired in a two flute and a four flute. Center cutting is optional but not required for the four flute. Most anything you will plunge cut with will work best with the two flute. Aluminum likes two flute. Steel likes four flute and small DOC finishing ops. Choosing the standard "sets" of end mills is not always economical. I'd rather buy better quality, single quantity sizes in the flute, type and shank size I use than get odd sizes this way and that. TiN is nice when you're cutting steel, but it causes build-up on the flutes with aluminum in my experience. Since I cut about equal of both, I stick to uncoated these days.

          1) I personally recommend the ones by Fisher Machine for unbeatable accuracy vs. cost. Love that guy!
          2) less height variety set is fine. You'll find you use one or two heights for 90% of your work. 3/16" or 1/4" thickness is pretty normal unless you have a much smaller machine.
          3) determine a straight shank size to standardize around. i.e. 1/2" or 3/4" based on your mill size. This reduces the number of collets you need and is very efficient anyhow.
          4) the largest shank size you'll likely use. i.e. 1/2" or 3/4"
          5) get the cheap ~10 buck set. this is the one I use on the mill and around the shop the most. leave the nice, expensive pairs for inspection only. just my two cents here.

          You are likely to get a whole slew of different directions from people here. That is good. We all use our tools for different tasks, jobs, etc. Take it all in stride. I've tried to stick to a completely general set of recommendations. Hopefully it is useful to you. Good luck!
          Last edited by Arthur.Marks; 07-24-2012, 02:59 PM.

          Comment


          • #6
            Arthur makes some very good points and Grind correctly pointed out you need a drill chuck.

            As to collets or endmill holders it depends on your spindle. Since you mentioned a VFD I'm surmising you have a Bridgeport or a clone. If that is the case go with collets.

            One thing I cannot over stress, do not buy the cheapest items as they are not the most cost effective. Cheap stuff is cheap for very good reasons and it will not last. You'll end up replacing it and spending more for the replacement with the cost of the first purchase effectively wasted.

            One other item is a dial test indicator and a flexible holder so your can tram (square up) the head to the table. Get a good one such as a Brown & Sharpe, Interapid, or Mitutoyo. You can also use it on your lathe or for inspection work. To mount the DTI you'll need a holder. My favorite is like this one http://www.use-enco.com/CGI/INSRIT?P...PMAKA=890-9237

            Comment


            • #7
              Buy or make a sheet metal tee slot cleaner. Buy the best vice you can afford. If your work holding methods or tooling are inaccurate, that will show up in everything you machine. What you save on a dirt cheap vice will be spent 10 times over in frustration. I've got the cheap vice that proves my point. A good drill chuck and arbour will also be needed. I'm not sure anyone is ever totally finished with buying tooling for a mill.

              Pete

              Comment


              • #8
                I find that roughing endmills are great for fast stock removal, especially on a small mill that doesn't have a lot of power and rigidity. I think I got mine at CDCO tools. I keep it permanently mounted in an endmill holder and use collets for all other endmills.

                I also got a couple of these http://www.grizzly.com/products/12-D...raction/T23012 digital read outs earlier this year. Not as good as a "real" DRO with all the features, but it was easily the BEST tool I've purchased in a long time. Milling is so much faster and less error prone now that I don't need to count handwheel turns carefully when making internal slots. Need to quickly drill a few holes precisely? Don't need to layout, just crank over to the X,Y locations and drop the quill. Best $60 I've spent in a long time

                Comment


                • #9
                  Buying stuff once you have all the relevant information is the easy part as said don't buy cheap although in some cases you won't need to start off with a very expensive things like a KURT VICE .I would also advice if you have a friend nearby to advise you, or we friends here .If you don't to keep your eyes open for SOME, not EVERYTHING, used it will be prudent to spend your hard earned money wisely and a lot of used stuff does not mean inferior quality just happens maybe someone is giving up the hobby due to health,or smaller housing etc.Please consider this and don't dismiss it for all the wrong reasons.I am not suggesting you buy something blind that is terribly complicated .have fun, Alistair
                  Please excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Good directions guys. I do have a BP, 1hp that has a Sony DRO on it. The vise is Boyer-Schultz that I got off Flylo. I also do have a superior DTI from Starrett, but no the holder.

                    So this is where I am...

                    1 endmill holder
                    set of collets up to 3/4 inch (brand matter much?)
                    1 set of parallels
                    1 hold down kit
                    1 edge finder
                    1 drill chuck
                    DTI holder


                    What kind of cutters? I like to work with inserts..seem a little easier. solid carbide? what sizes? I looked at the Glacern site..very nice stuff!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Buy a shop vac. I bought a used numatic vac for £50 recently and it's been a godsend, both for keeping the mill and surrounding floor clean and keeping the wife happy (she no longer complains about me bringing swarf in on my shoes).
                      Peter - novice home machinist, modern motorcycle enthusiast.

                      Denford Viceroy 280 Synchro (11 x 24)
                      Herbert 0V adapted to R8 by 'Sir John'.
                      Monarch 10EE 1942

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by cuemaker View Post
                        Good directions guys. I do have a BP, 1hp that has a Sony DRO on it. The vise is Boyer-Schultz that I got off Flylo. I also do have a superior DTI from Starrett, but no the holder.

                        So this is where I am...

                        1 endmill holder
                        set of collets up to 3/4 inch (brand matter much?)
                        1 set of parallels
                        1 hold down kit
                        1 edge finder
                        1 drill chuck
                        DTI holder


                        What kind of cutters? I like to work with inserts..seem a little easier. solid carbide? what sizes? I looked at the Glacern site..very nice stuff!
                        Hi,

                        Skip the end mill holder. Just go with the collets. A 1hp Bridgeport doesn't have the power to need a holder. And inexpensive set of R8's from Enco will be perfectly adequate for home shop use. It's not like you will be changing out tooling 200 times in a day, everyday, all day for 50+ hours a week. They will last for years with light to moderate use in a home shop. And the run out will also be acceptable for your machine.

                        Don't bother buying a hold down set. Make your own. It's cheap and good practice for you. Plus step blocks are junk to use. I drill and tap for bolts to support the back of my clamps. I also make my own tee nuts, but I have access to S5 & S7, 4140, and D2. Still soft tee nuts will work fine also.

                        A couple of edge finders are good. I like Fisher Clickers with the 1/2x 1/2 size.

                        Inexpensive parallels are generally pretty accurate. I would start with 1/8" thick. I often wish for thinner rather than thicker.

                        While I tend to view mills as poor drill presses, having a decent drill chuck is a must. You probably don't need to have the most expensive brand, but it needs to be of good quality.

                        I also would recommend a boring head. A 3" will go fine on your mill. But I'd be more concerned about matching bar shank sizes to what you use in your lathe if possible.

                        Insert face mills are OK to have. Though with your 1hp, you may wish to limit the size to 2" for best results. But I would concentrate on buying endmills before face mills. I agree with buying good name brand endmills, but looking at sale prices from the likes of Enco, solid carbide endmills are getting to be quite price competitive with good M42 HSS. Particularly if you can get by with some of the odd sizes they tend to sale price. My problem is I can resharpen HSS at work for free but I can't do carbide.

                        Always lean to buying more endmills. You have a lathe and now a mill. There is very little that you cannot make now. So why buy things you can make from scrap?

                        dalee
                        Last edited by dalee100; 07-24-2012, 09:55 PM.
                        If you think you understand what is going on, you haven't been paying attention.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Get a good solid box about 2/3 the size of a shoe box. As you start making runts from your bar stock, toss anything you see that looks like it has T-Nuts in it into the box. Once in a while make some T-Nuts. They have a way of wandering off. Never misunderestimate the worth of cross-drilled and threaded rouonds for specialty uses as nuts.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Sorry if i missed this, but has anyone mentioned good safety glasses and a first aid kit.?

                            A "Must Have" in any homeshop or otherwise.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Maybe not now but when you can afford it a small boring head and a set of suitable HSS boring tools. HSS Not carbide unless you want to add carbide suited diamond wheels for the face grinder you also may not have.

                              Files, and a simple deburring tool.

                              A rack for spindle tooling, frequenty used wrenches. Plywood works good and it won't mar the tooling. Plus if you do a nice job of making wood racks for your tools they will be more accessible and handsome attraction for visitors to admire.

                              A shop vac was mentioned. I quite literlly cannot function around a illing machine without a shop vac equipped with a wand switch. I will not use air because it scatters chips while a vac collects them so you have to handle them once instead of three time.. Add to this a crevise tool cut away on the tip so it can snuff out chips from the slots.

                              A chip guard something like a trifold screen made of light lumber and plywood. Really cheesy bypass closet doors with back fold hinges work well. This keeps the chip scatter down when you use flycutters or carbide face mills.

                              Forgot to add:

                              A selection of cuttiing fluids in pint quantities and a baggie of cheap acid brushes.

                              My first selection for coolant is WD40. It's a miserable lubricant and metal preservative but a pretty good cutting oil. I'd get it in a squirt bottle but a spray can with the red squirter straw isn't much more expensive.

                              If you work with tough stainless or gummy mild steel, you might wish to purchase a small can of black pipe threading oil from the big box store. It's smelly and messy but in a pinch, very handy and it leaves smooth untorn surfaces.

                              A container of soluable oil (gallon was the smallest I could find after a quick search. I keep a quart laundry squirt bottle handy to the drill press, lathe, and the mill (different parts of the shop.) I mix about 10 to 1 for drilling.

                              You probably already have the above at your lathe but if you don't coolants are a low cost addition.
                              Last edited by Forrest Addy; 07-24-2012, 11:20 PM.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X