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So I am getting ready to buy stuff for my mill, initial setup type stuff....

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  • lakeside53
    replied
    I have multiple collet sets - R8, ER32 and ER40 (on loan). Also have two sets of R8 EM holders. I primarily use the EM holders. If you are doing work that requires different sized EM, you simply write down the z-axis offset of each and adjust "0" each time you load them.

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  • tmc_31
    replied
    cuemaker,

    I am going to go against the flow here and recommend end mill holders over collets for holding endmills. I was where you are a couple of years ago (only I didn't have as nice a mill as a Bridgeport) and bought a set of R8 collets from CDCO. I had two of them "suck out" of the collet while machining parts, ruining the parts in the process. I then bought a set of end mill holders with the set screw for the weldon flat on an end mill, also from CDCO. Never had that problem again.

    While I agree that quality cutters are worth their cost, I suggest that you get some cheap ones to practice with. Trust me, you will destroy a few end mills before you get the hang of speeds, feeds and depth of cut.

    It is great fun, all the best

    Tim

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  • Arthur.Marks
    replied
    Factor in, though, that you'll rarely if ever chip just one insert when you do. Personally, I would stick to HSS. Cobalt has a higher temp. resistance but is slightly more brittle than HSS. For end mills, I don't see that kind of benefit really making a difference on a manual machine. My recommendation is to consider HSS as your bread and butter cutting tool material. Then pick up one carbide size that would seem to be the most useful and versatile for what you do with the hardened pieces. If it is large enough to accomodate an insertable tool, I say go that route. A solid carbide shank is more rigid than a HSS shank. That doesn't really make a difference unless you are cutting with a tool far extended or hogging off material in bulk. A solid carbide end mill does have the advantage of presenting a much longer side cutting edge than the comparable insert type. For some operations this may be of benefit, but the reality is an insert type will do the same thing with just a few more passes.

    Single or double is a personal choice as well as one of workholding consideration. 1/2" diameter and below double end EMs will fit in a collet fine. Above that, they may bottom out in your R-8 collet or end mill holder. My advise is single end above 1/2". Half inch and below: double end is usually more economical than buying two single end.
    Last edited by Arthur.Marks; 07-25-2012, 11:59 AM.

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  • cuemaker
    replied
    I am still a bit unclear on a item or 2.

    I really like the idea of carbide inserts...While more expensive, if I "break" it, odds are I just can replace the insert for say $8, vs a $14 end mill. Or am I better off buying 4 endmills for the price of one carbide inserted endmill? Here is my 1st thought on a carbide inserted endmill...http://www.glacern.com/em90_2
    Looking at the 5/8 endmill that is 1.625 deep cut for $80.

    Or, if I go non indexable, do I want single end or double end? Carbide or cobalt? I plan on cutting steel, sometime hardened to 35RC.

    I realize I can get 4 endmills for the price of the indexable....And I dont believe in cheapening out on cutting tools, seems like a waste of time and money.

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  • loose nut
    replied
    Originally posted by dalee100 View Post
    Hi,

    Skip the end mill holder. Just go with the collets.

    Don't bother buying a hold down set. Make your own.

    Plus step blocks are junk to use.




    + 1 on the collets, if you tighten them down enough you won't have trouble.

    A clamp set (hold down set) is a necessity and making your own is a lot of work considering how cheap they are now. They are not a high precision item and the cheap ones are fine for the home shop.

    Step blocks work great, you can't rely on them for everything but they give great flexibility for clamping.

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  • mikerolly
    replied
    Some excellent advice offered above, I wish I had asked a similar question before buying my milling tooling. Pay particular attention to the advice of working around a specific end mill shank size, a very good and economical practice. I went with the expensive and in hindsight, an inpractical large boxed set of end mills. There are several that have never been used and will probably stay in the box, just no need for a large selection of differing shank sizes.

    One item I see that has been not mentioned, a good quality dead blow and non marring hammer. Useful for tapping the drawbar nut to help dislodge a shank, used in setting up work in the vice by tapping the work against your parrelels before tightening the vice jaws.

    Made mine from melted wheel weights poured into a hack job of a hardwood mold held together with G clamps. Spray or brush the inside of the mold with a few coats of marine grade lanolin. Open the mold after about 20 seconds and drop your lead hammer head on a wet towel to let it cool.

    Good luck with your new machine mate.


    Mike

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  • Forrest Addy
    replied
    Maybe not now but when you can afford it a small boring head and a set of suitable HSS boring tools. HSS Not carbide unless you want to add carbide suited diamond wheels for the face grinder you also may not have.

    Files, and a simple deburring tool.

    A rack for spindle tooling, frequenty used wrenches. Plywood works good and it won't mar the tooling. Plus if you do a nice job of making wood racks for your tools they will be more accessible and handsome attraction for visitors to admire.

    A shop vac was mentioned. I quite literlly cannot function around a illing machine without a shop vac equipped with a wand switch. I will not use air because it scatters chips while a vac collects them so you have to handle them once instead of three time.. Add to this a crevise tool cut away on the tip so it can snuff out chips from the slots.

    A chip guard something like a trifold screen made of light lumber and plywood. Really cheesy bypass closet doors with back fold hinges work well. This keeps the chip scatter down when you use flycutters or carbide face mills.

    Forgot to add:

    A selection of cuttiing fluids in pint quantities and a baggie of cheap acid brushes.

    My first selection for coolant is WD40. It's a miserable lubricant and metal preservative but a pretty good cutting oil. I'd get it in a squirt bottle but a spray can with the red squirter straw isn't much more expensive.

    If you work with tough stainless or gummy mild steel, you might wish to purchase a small can of black pipe threading oil from the big box store. It's smelly and messy but in a pinch, very handy and it leaves smooth untorn surfaces.

    A container of soluable oil (gallon was the smallest I could find after a quick search. I keep a quart laundry squirt bottle handy to the drill press, lathe, and the mill (different parts of the shop.) I mix about 10 to 1 for drilling.

    You probably already have the above at your lathe but if you don't coolants are a low cost addition.
    Last edited by Forrest Addy; 07-24-2012, 11:20 PM.

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  • sasquatch
    replied
    Sorry if i missed this, but has anyone mentioned good safety glasses and a first aid kit.?

    A "Must Have" in any homeshop or otherwise.

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  • dp
    replied
    Get a good solid box about 2/3 the size of a shoe box. As you start making runts from your bar stock, toss anything you see that looks like it has T-Nuts in it into the box. Once in a while make some T-Nuts. They have a way of wandering off. Never misunderestimate the worth of cross-drilled and threaded rouonds for specialty uses as nuts.

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  • dalee100
    replied
    Originally posted by cuemaker View Post
    Good directions guys. I do have a BP, 1hp that has a Sony DRO on it. The vise is Boyer-Schultz that I got off Flylo. I also do have a superior DTI from Starrett, but no the holder.

    So this is where I am...

    1 endmill holder
    set of collets up to 3/4 inch (brand matter much?)
    1 set of parallels
    1 hold down kit
    1 edge finder
    1 drill chuck
    DTI holder


    What kind of cutters? I like to work with inserts..seem a little easier. solid carbide? what sizes? I looked at the Glacern site..very nice stuff!
    Hi,

    Skip the end mill holder. Just go with the collets. A 1hp Bridgeport doesn't have the power to need a holder. And inexpensive set of R8's from Enco will be perfectly adequate for home shop use. It's not like you will be changing out tooling 200 times in a day, everyday, all day for 50+ hours a week. They will last for years with light to moderate use in a home shop. And the run out will also be acceptable for your machine.

    Don't bother buying a hold down set. Make your own. It's cheap and good practice for you. Plus step blocks are junk to use. I drill and tap for bolts to support the back of my clamps. I also make my own tee nuts, but I have access to S5 & S7, 4140, and D2. Still soft tee nuts will work fine also.

    A couple of edge finders are good. I like Fisher Clickers with the 1/2x 1/2 size.

    Inexpensive parallels are generally pretty accurate. I would start with 1/8" thick. I often wish for thinner rather than thicker.

    While I tend to view mills as poor drill presses, having a decent drill chuck is a must. You probably don't need to have the most expensive brand, but it needs to be of good quality.

    I also would recommend a boring head. A 3" will go fine on your mill. But I'd be more concerned about matching bar shank sizes to what you use in your lathe if possible.

    Insert face mills are OK to have. Though with your 1hp, you may wish to limit the size to 2" for best results. But I would concentrate on buying endmills before face mills. I agree with buying good name brand endmills, but looking at sale prices from the likes of Enco, solid carbide endmills are getting to be quite price competitive with good M42 HSS. Particularly if you can get by with some of the odd sizes they tend to sale price. My problem is I can resharpen HSS at work for free but I can't do carbide.

    Always lean to buying more endmills. You have a lathe and now a mill. There is very little that you cannot make now. So why buy things you can make from scrap?

    dalee
    Last edited by dalee100; 07-24-2012, 09:55 PM.

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  • Peter.
    replied
    Buy a shop vac. I bought a used numatic vac for £50 recently and it's been a godsend, both for keeping the mill and surrounding floor clean and keeping the wife happy (she no longer complains about me bringing swarf in on my shoes).

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  • cuemaker
    replied
    Good directions guys. I do have a BP, 1hp that has a Sony DRO on it. The vise is Boyer-Schultz that I got off Flylo. I also do have a superior DTI from Starrett, but no the holder.

    So this is where I am...

    1 endmill holder
    set of collets up to 3/4 inch (brand matter much?)
    1 set of parallels
    1 hold down kit
    1 edge finder
    1 drill chuck
    DTI holder


    What kind of cutters? I like to work with inserts..seem a little easier. solid carbide? what sizes? I looked at the Glacern site..very nice stuff!

    Leave a comment:


  • Alistair Hosie
    replied
    Buying stuff once you have all the relevant information is the easy part as said don't buy cheap although in some cases you won't need to start off with a very expensive things like a KURT VICE .I would also advice if you have a friend nearby to advise you, or we friends here .If you don't to keep your eyes open for SOME, not EVERYTHING, used it will be prudent to spend your hard earned money wisely and a lot of used stuff does not mean inferior quality just happens maybe someone is giving up the hobby due to health,or smaller housing etc.Please consider this and don't dismiss it for all the wrong reasons.I am not suggesting you buy something blind that is terribly complicated .have fun, Alistair

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  • lwalker
    replied
    I find that roughing endmills are great for fast stock removal, especially on a small mill that doesn't have a lot of power and rigidity. I think I got mine at CDCO tools. I keep it permanently mounted in an endmill holder and use collets for all other endmills.

    I also got a couple of these http://www.grizzly.com/products/12-D...raction/T23012 digital read outs earlier this year. Not as good as a "real" DRO with all the features, but it was easily the BEST tool I've purchased in a long time. Milling is so much faster and less error prone now that I don't need to count handwheel turns carefully when making internal slots. Need to quickly drill a few holes precisely? Don't need to layout, just crank over to the X,Y locations and drop the quill. Best $60 I've spent in a long time

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  • uncle pete
    replied
    Buy or make a sheet metal tee slot cleaner. Buy the best vice you can afford. If your work holding methods or tooling are inaccurate, that will show up in everything you machine. What you save on a dirt cheap vice will be spent 10 times over in frustration. I've got the cheap vice that proves my point. A good drill chuck and arbour will also be needed. I'm not sure anyone is ever totally finished with buying tooling for a mill.

    Pete

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