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Metal shears, why so expensive? Anyone make their own?

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  • Metal shears, why so expensive? Anyone make their own?

    Like the title says. I am interested in a metal shear to keep the shop a but cleaner and use less cutting blades and stuff. But why are they so expensive? Anyone ever make their own? I'd like to be able to cut 2x1/4" bar and smaller as well as 16 or so gauge by 10-12"(maybe more?) and thinner.

    Ideas, thoughts, opinions, and stuff?
    Andy

  • #2
    Lots of metal and engineering in a shear that dont break. You might be able to find an old one and go through it.

    Comment


    • #3
      I bought one, call Groz I think, Polish maybe, several years ago. About $100, will cut up to 1/4 in bar stock or 1/8 in sheet metal. Works good and the price didn't seem to high for what it does.
      The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

      Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

      Southwestern Ontario. Canada

      Comment


      • #4
        What is the size of the shear loose nut? Happen to have a pic? I have no idea what size overall of a shear is needed for 1/4" bar and fairly heavy sheet. $100 is a steal compared to what I am seeing. Unless I am looking at too big of shears.
        Andy

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        • #5
          I would advise patience. While many go nuts for sheetmetal and other "ironworking" tools, many others simply want the space these large chunks of iron reside in.
          "I am, and ever will be, a white-socks, pocket-protector, nerdy engineer -- born under the second law of thermodynamics, steeped in the steam tables, in love with free-body diagrams, transformed by Laplace, and propelled by compressible flow."

          Comment


          • #6
            If space (and money) are problems, why not use Oxy/Acet or plasma for cutting larger items and "nibblers" (hand-held) which will cut up to 2.5mm (~0.100").

            Plasma is not limitted to cutting steel either as it will pretty well cut any metal that conducts electricity.

            Comment


            • #7
              I've always used an angle grinder, a little slower maybe but cuts up to 1" by anything! (2" if you flip the part over) Also it can "plunge cut" in sheet materials, as long as the thickness is pretty small compared to the hole size (e.g. cutouts for sockets in electrical boxes and the like). With a bit of care it can cut within a degree or so of square, better if you have it in a "chop saw" adaptor with a vice and hinge, or clamp on a piece of angle a a guide. A lot smaller than a shear / guillotine / plasma cutter to store, too!

              Dave H. (the other one)
              Rules are for the obedience of fools, and the guidance of wise men.

              Holbrook Model C Number 13 lathe, Testa 2U universal mill, bikes and tools

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by vpt View Post
                What is the size of the shear loose nut? Happen to have a pic? I have no idea what size overall of a shear is needed for 1/4" bar and fairly heavy sheet. $100 is a steal compared to what I am seeing. Unless I am looking at too big of shears.
                It will shear 10 to 12", sorry I don't have a picture but it is the kind that has a handle that you pull down to pull the top blade across the fixed lower blade, like a pair of scissors.

                P.S.

                I found this which is similar to the type I have

                http://www.busybeetools.com/products...-12IN.-HD.html
                Last edited by loose nut; 07-27-2012, 10:37 AM.
                The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

                Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

                Southwestern Ontario. Canada

                Comment


                • #9
                  After your original post, spent some time looking and I am left with the impression this is one of those times you really get what you pay for in terms of quality, reliability, ease of use v. dollars spent.
                  I am a bit surprised at the difference in cost between "slitting shear" and "Beverly shear" [also informative since I did not know there were considerable differences]...I am also assuming most of the bigger dollar ones are/were originally meant for production shops, unless I were to change what I am now doing, most of those would be overkill BUT then it becomes the classic case of trying to find something between dirt cheap which will be a project from day one and always needing attention and say a Beverly shear for around $1200 that there is almost no way I will get that amount of value out of...

                  Edit: I was under impression "Beverly shear" was proper name and it maybe but some info has it looking like it may have been a particular shear made by the Beverly Company and so different the name stuck to the tool in general...found some pics where a slitting shear was labeled as "made by Beverly"
                  Last edited by RussZHC; 07-27-2012, 11:24 AM.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by oldtiffie View Post
                    If space (and money) are problems, why not use Oxy/Acet or plasma for cutting larger items and "nibblers" (hand-held) which will cut up to 2.5mm (~0.100").

                    Plasma is not limitted to cutting steel either as it will pretty well cut any metal that conducts electricity.

                    Only issues I have with gas is rough edges, edges need to be ground off to be able to TIG weld (contamination), gas and oxy cost money and is slow to cut and makes a mess. I have been wanting a plasma cutter for awhile but nearly the same deal with having to grind the cut for TIG welding, drops slag on the floor, and is still kind of an ordeal to pull out, plug in, set up, then cut.

                    Originally posted by Hopefuldave View Post
                    I've always used an angle grinder, a little slower maybe but cuts up to 1" by anything! (2" if you flip the part over) Also it can "plunge cut" in sheet materials, as long as the thickness is pretty small compared to the hole size (e.g. cutouts for sockets in electrical boxes and the like). With a bit of care it can cut within a degree or so of square, better if you have it in a "chop saw" adaptor with a vice and hinge, or clamp on a piece of angle a a guide. A lot smaller than a shear / guillotine / plasma cutter to store, too!

                    Dave H. (the other one)
                    I am trying to avoid using consumables and making a mess in the shop. An angle grinder/die grinder is normally my very last resort for trying to get something cut. I don't have a shortage of cutting tools, I've got everything from a chop saw and bandsaw to a dremmel tool. The reason I am looking into a shear is for the speed, cleanliness, and no consumables (buy it once and done).

                    Originally posted by loose nut View Post
                    It will shear 10 to 12", sorry I don't have a picture but it is the kind that has a handle that you pull down to pull the top blade across the fixed lower blade, like a pair of scissors.

                    P.S.

                    I found this which is similar to the type I have

                    http://www.busybeetools.com/products...-12IN.-HD.html


                    That seems to be the common one. Does it have a hard time cutting 1/4" bar stock? It looks to be a nice compact shear that can be mounted on the end of a bench. Is there an in between shear that is bigger than this 10-12" but not the huge 36"+ ones? Thats all I seem to be finding is these 10-12" or the big ones.
                    Andy

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      There are different versions, although they all look alike to me. I use mine for sheet metal with the occasional 1/8" or 3/16" piece of flat bar and very rarely a bit of 1/4" x 2" and it has done it all without any trouble. The
                      write up that came with mine said 1/8" max but it only has a short handle. Most seem to claim 1/4" max but have a much longer 2 piece handle. There use to be bigger industrial models but I haven't seen one for a long time, power shears are the norm now.
                      The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

                      Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

                      Southwestern Ontario. Canada

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        A power shear would be nice but they take up quite a bit of room. I am hoping for something that can be bench mounted. I think I will be getting rid of a few tools that I haven't used in the last 5 years like my chop saw to make up some room.
                        Andy

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by RussZHC View Post
                          I was under impression "Beverly shear" was proper name and it maybe
                          but some info has it looking like it may have been a particular shear made by the
                          Beverly Company and so different the name stuck to the tool in general.
                          My vote is that Beverly Shear has become synonymous with throatless shear,
                          in the same way Jet Ski (trademark of Kawasaki) and, once upon a time, Sea-Doo
                          became synonymous with personal watercraft.

                          Unlike the manual sheet metal shear in loose nut's BusyBee link which is essentially
                          limited to making straight cuts, a throatless shear is capable of cutting curves as
                          well as straight sections. A video of the differences:

                          Originally posted by vpt
                          I'd like to be able to cut 2x1/4" bar and smaller as well as 16 or so gauge by 10-12"(maybe
                          more?) and thinner.

                          Is there an in-between shear that is bigger than this 10-12", but not the huge 36"+ ones?
                          Another very important criteria is the type of material: steel, aluminum, stainless ...

                          It is my belief that your requirements limit your selection to a large bench-mounted
                          plate shear, a big brother to the style shown in the BusyBee link.

                          The 3-in-1 shear-brake-roll machines that I know of are all rated optimistically at
                          20 ga for mild steel, in practice this should be held back to 22 ga. I think these
                          usually jump from 12" to 30" and grow wider from there, although someone may
                          offer a 24". (An HSM member has modified his machine to beef up the moving
                          shear and the bed of his 3-in-1 but he still isn't using it for 16 ga, IIRC. I will
                          look for a thread where he discusses his modifications.)

                          Old school foot shears rated for 16 ga are sizable pieces of equipment. Here
                          is a link with pictures of a Brown-Boggs #169b that will give you an idea of what
                          kind of mass was deemed necessary to produce a reliable shear in those days.

                          The MetalMeet forum might be another resource to explore.

                          .

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by EddyCurr View Post
                            (An HSM member has modified his machine to beef up the moving shear and the bed of his 3-in-1
                            but he still isn't using it for 16 ga, IIRC. I will look for a thread where he discusses his modifications.)
                            The member I have in mind is CCWKen

                            Here is a link to his thread "For EddyCurr and those following the 3in1 Machine mods" (2012.01.19).
                            In it he writes that he has cut 18 ga mild steel in 24" lengths with some protest.



                            .

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by EddyCurr View Post
                              ... although someone may offer a 24".
                              Of course, the Di-Acro Model 24 Hand Shear is rated for 16 ga.

                              Pricey. There are some examples on eBay.

                              .

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