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  • Old jet engine...

    http://cockpitfest.21.forumer.com/viewtopic.php?t=628




    One Rolls Royce Derwent jet engine, one of the very first operational jet engines, the Allies had these in WWII and we have two of them! But you can buy one..I will even put it on a pallet for you!

    It is being offered as not likely to be suitable for running but never underestimate the powers of determined home shoppers!
    Last edited by The Artful Bodger; 07-29-2012, 02:58 AM.

  • #2
    John,

    What did it come off of, and how did it get to Ashburton?
    Allan Ostling

    Phoenix, Arizona

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    • #3
      Allan, it is one of two that came with a Gloster Meteor we got from our cousins on the big red island to the west of here.

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      • #4
        It looks very like the "Ghost" engine in D-H "Sea Venom" and "Vampire" single jet engines.

        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/De_Havilland_Venom

        http://www.google.com.au/#hl=en&gs_n...w=1920&bih=851

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        • #5
          Yes, it does look like a Ghost engine but this is a Derwent, smaller, less powerful and older design. This one was in a Gloster Meteor.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by The Artful Bodger View Post
            Yes, it does look like a Ghost engine but this is a Derwent, smaller, less powerful and older design. This one was in a Gloster Meteor.
            The Glouster Meteor was used by RAAF 77 Squadron in Korea but was out-classed by the Russian MIG's and was replaced by the Sabres which were much more up to dealing with some very good Russian/Chinese pilots in Russian MIG's.

            The GM's were retired and replaced by the Australian made/assembled (under licence) USA Sabres.

            The last I saw of the GM was that they were used as a remote-guided/flown target (tracking and firing) for the (piloted) Sabres at the Woomera missile testing range. The Sabres used the "Sidewinder" (USA) missile which were fired at the GM's but "set low" to miss the GM's - didn't always work as planned as every so often a SW would go straight up the exhaust of the GM engine. Some of the remote pilots were prety good but most time the piloted Sabres were better.

            There were often a few of those engines just lying around on the range in the desert - some were a bit mangled from the crash to earth but others may have been OK for display purposes etc..

            It was quite a spectacular sight - and so was a lot of other stuff tested/fired at the Woomera Ranges.

            My family was at Woomera for about 14 years and I and my brother were Apprentices at the (then) Long Range Weapons Research Establishment (in Adelaide, South Australia) and had several transfers to Woomera as part of our Apprenticeship training.

            http://www.google.com.au/search?q=gl...w=1920&bih=851

            http://www.google.com.au/#hl=en&rlz=....,cf.osb&cad=b
            Last edited by oldtiffie; 07-29-2012, 04:31 AM.

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            • #7
              I dont think this one has ever felt a Sidewinder up it's tail pipe!

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              • #8
                This the Meteor in our museum..

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                • #9
                  Not wanting to take this thread OT and only personal views but the engineer in me looks at these engines and it does nothing for me.
                  After decades of seeing all sorts of fantastic piston engines when the jet came in to me it looks like a collection of bean tins when compared to a big radial or Merlin.

                  I accept that this was the way forward as regards power and maintenance but doesn't mean I have to like them - sorry, others have their own opinions which is what this is.
                  .

                  Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



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                  • #10
                    I really prefer propeller planes aesthetically,too,but having ridden in Grumman Gray Goose seaplanes as a teenager in Alaska,I do prefer the smoothness of jets. Those old wwII Gray Gooses would shake your teeth out!! They flew low and slow,and drop 20 feet when they hit an air pocket,hitting the bottom with a huge CLANG!!. Guess it was the tool box in the back or something.

                    I got sick as a dog going from Ketchikan to Sitka when I was in the 4th. grade. Didn't know better than to try to read a Popular Mechanic's magazine on the way there. Weather so rough we had to turn back on the first try. We flew out of Alaska on a Constellation in 1957,which was better. Guess it flew higher.

                    These early,bulky British jet engines made for very fat aircraft,too.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by John Stevenson View Post
                      the jet came in to me it looks like a collection of bean tins
                      .

                      You have no soul John. Jet engines rock
                      The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

                      Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

                      Southwestern Ontario. Canada

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                      • #12
                        I'm not a fan of jet engines, either, especially the tubby ones. But I've always liked the looks of the Meteor. Now that it's an antique, the generous girth of the engine pods lends it a certain quaint charm that wasn't apparent to me back then.

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                        • #13
                          Why not keep the engine there on static display in front of the aircraft?
                          "The Administration does not support blowing up planets." --- Finally some SENSIBLE policy from the Gov!

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                          • #14
                            The Air Zoo in Kalamazoo had an auction about 4 years ago. Sold about 25 jet engines for aprox $400 ea. Theses were about 8' cubed. Thought about one for a lawn ornementm but really want a radial coffee table.
                            "Let me recommend the best medicine in the
                            world: a long journey, at a mild season, through a pleasant
                            country, in easy stages."
                            ~ James Madison

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by cameron View Post
                              the generous girth of the engine pods lends it a certain quaint charm
                              That must mean I have a "certain quaint charm" also.
                              The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

                              Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

                              Southwestern Ontario. Canada

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