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  • Plans and drawings

    Hi to all,

    When you read the home shop machinist magazine and see all those nice plans and drawings, I always wonder what kind of software they use to make them. Anybody knows??

    Mario

  • #2
    George does an excellent job of getting the drawings into printable form. I think he uses Solidworks, but he can tell you better. For my articles I submit .DXF files that I generate from an ancient version of AutoSketch. Others use newer software and still others (literally) submit hand sketches on cocktail napkins or brown paper bags. However it comes in, George renders it worthy to go into the magazine.
    Weston Bye - Author, The Mechatronist column, Digital Machinist magazine
    ~Practitioner of the Electromechanical Arts~

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    • #3
      If you get a chance, get a hold of and learn Solidworks.
      It is so great. Just saying.

      --Doozer
      DZER

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      • #4
        AND SOOOOOOO expensive!!!
        not the kind of thing you buy just to do "pretty modeling and drawings.
        there are much cheaper and some free program that will do instead. Solidworks is a "production tool" unless you can aford expensive toys.
        that said I love mine and forget how to use most of it if I don't use it at least once a month!

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        • #5
          What about "Sketch Up"?

          http://www.google.com.au/#hl=en&rlz=...w=1920&bih=851

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          • #6
            I haven't submitted anything to any magazine. For drawing things I use DeltaCad. It was inexpensive and is pretty intuitive to use. I can put together drawings that make sense to me even if I don't use it for several months.

            I had a copy of autocad and could barely draw a square box with it. Got to the point that I could finish a drawing but then if I didn't use it for a little while I had to learn it all over again.

            Just my opinion of course.

            Jeff

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            • #7
              As most here know I like and use SketchUp. Some people sneer at it but I am looking forward to see what Trimble Corp does with it since they bought it and the staff from Google earlier this year. Even version 8 which I use can do far more than most people give it credit. Right now I just finished a much bigger and more accurate model of Gale Crater on Mars. Ask most people familiar with it and they will tell you what I am doing is impossible on Sketchup. The model has nearly a million edges and over 1/3 million faces and saves at 173 megabytes.
              Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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              • #8
                Lot's of tools, just depends on your budget and ambitions.

                I have done 3D using ProgeCad (a $00.00 AutoCad clone) and AutoCad. For many things 3d, Progecad seemed to behave better than AutoCad 2007

                For 2D I have used a freebie from the same folks that make SolidWorkds called DraftSight. It is also an AutoCad 2D clone, but is able to render a 3D drawing.

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                • #9
                  I use Visio 2010 for tiny parts to entire mutli-story building.. it has an excellent 2D CAD mode and can export/import to just about anything.

                  I have a decent autocad clone, but just haven't got into it. Same with BoBcad 23.

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                  • #10
                    I use AutoCad LT. Mine is LT98, and I need to upgrade it to 2002 to be compatible with some other folks I need to send stuff to and accept from.

                    Anyway, I drew all the stuff for my articles with it, and the drawings were used as-is. The key is using lineweights correctly..... in AutoCad that is best done with polylines, which have assignable lineweights. In other CAD packages it may be some other name.

                    VP pays better if they can use your drawings directly. And if you include lots of pictures
                    CNC machines only go through the motions.

                    Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
                    Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
                    Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
                    I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
                    Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

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                    • #11
                      Why should any CAD package generate "Instant Draughtsmen (Draftsmen)"? The computer must be one of the most job destructive machines invented. It is really surprising that many blame the far eastern manufacturing companies for inducing people to dig into their pockets, buy crap, gloat and then complain about the demise of Old School machinery. With a slack handful of CD/DVDs, everybody can be an "Expert" on any subject.The English language suffers in some part due to "Txtng" thanks to mobile phones.

                      Haven't seen any on Instant Brain surgery but it can't be long.

                      Regards Ian.
                      You might not like what I say,but that doesn't mean I'm wrong.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
                        I use AutoCad LT. Mine is LT98, and I need to upgrade it to 2002 to be compatible with some other folks I need to send stuff to and accept from.

                        Anyway, I drew all the stuff for my articles with it, and the drawings were used as-is. The key is using lineweights correctly..... in AutoCad that is best done with polylines, which have assignable lineweights. In other CAD packages it may be some other name.

                        VP pays better if they can use your drawings directly. And if you include lots of pictures

                        You may be surprised at the power of some of the free autocad clones out there! I've been an autocad user since version 8, and since I'm now retired, I use both Progecad Smart, and Draftsight (by Dassault Systemes). I originally started using Draftsight because they had a Linux version (also have mac and windows versions) which I installed on a linux box. Both programs can read and write newer .dwg and .dxf formats. Another freebie I've used is doublecad xt which has the ability to work with Sketchup files. You'll find the interface of all of these extremely familiar if you have autocad experience, to the point where the only learning curve is figuring out how to configure your drawing environment the way you like it. (especially draftsight)

                        Regards
                        Bob

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                        • #13
                          George uses Solidworks. I have had two articles run in that magazine and spoken to George. He uses the same software as I do.---Brian
                          Brian Rupnow
                          Design engineer
                          Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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                          • #14
                            To answer the OP’s question, I use SolidWorks for all the drawings in The Home Shop Machinist, Machinist’s Workshop, and Digital Machinist magazines. Neil Knopf does the drawings for Live Steam, using an older version of SolidWorks.

                            It’s a great program and there is no way I would be able to move the same amount of drawings across my desk without it. My CFO chokes every time he gets the maintenance bill but it really is a must have item for our business.

                            As much as I like the program though, there is no way I could justify the cost for my home shop and I use either CADKey or an old seat of MasterCAM draft at home.

                            Even though I get more and more CAD files these days, it all has to go through my SW box for adjustments unique to the requirements of the magazines. Line weights and font sizes must be adjusted with the capabilities of the printing press in mind, as I was recently reminded when I used an author’s drawing in DM and found that the lines were invisible. Looked fine on my monitor and my laser printer, but the press is a different beast and the guy proofing the press signature had no way of knowing that components were missing from the drawing.

                            Control over the size and resolution of the file required by the art department is another reason I must rework every drawing.

                            As Jerry mentioned, we do pay more for pages with drawings on them, provided the author gets credit. With me reworking every drawing, how do we determine who gets credit? Basically, I take all of the work to get it through our press and into the magazine out of the picture. If the drawings are complete enough that someone could build the project, and have it turn out correctly, then the author gets credit, no matter what format it comes in on. If the drawings are full of errors, are incomplete, or require me to reengineer the entire part, the author won’t get credit.

                            Probably more of an answer than you were looking for!
                            George
                            Traverse City, MI

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                            • #15
                              I do a lot of consultancy for a company that uses www.nanocad.com - a freebie autocad-type bit of software.

                              Although you have to put in your name/email address to get a download link i can say from experience that they do NO spam you or give your email address to other people.

                              Personally i use solidworks but if i had to use a freebie nanocad would be high on my list.

                              Disclaimer : no affilliation with the company just a happy customer/user...

                              Cheers
                              Batt

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