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  • Why not??

    Has anybody besides me ever wondered why there isn't a program on Public TV or on one of the cable channels about metal working? Something similar to that excellent program about wood working called "The New Yankee Workshop"? I may object mildly to it being called "Yankee" but I think there would be a great interest in such a program.

  • #2
    Probably ain't enough of us to make a respectable audience...
    bbfmetalworking

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    • #3
      I did catch parts of some episodes about blacksmithing on the RFD (?) channel.

      I wish I could see it from the beginning.

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      • #4
        I think this was brought up before a while ago we discussed the need then, sadly nothing has been done yet.Even more sadly you can't even get/buy good videos in UK format. What alife Alistair
        Please excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

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        • #5
          Really think there would be a lack of sponsors AND viewers. Take a look at the numbers, HSM maybe 25000 (?) subscribers, FWW and Woodsmith group half a million + (?) each. If there is anyway you can do it........I'll be watching!

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          • #6
            I took a harley fender, sandbag, hammer and beat a special shaped dent into it to hold the 37 chevy tail light. The onlookers thought that was the neatest thing.

            Kinda boring forming metal by hand. Slow and tedious, not very many brain cells needed. Just a lot of sweat.

            Reckon people would want to see a greybearded large man go rap rap rap with a hammer? I think not.

            David

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            • #7
              This is were Neil is going to step in and say, "It's funny you should mention this,we are about to" and so on. As I understand it all it takes is someone to put a demo tape together and sell it to the right people. I for one would support it and I know others who would to. I think between you folks south of the boarder and us on the snowy side, we could certainly put together a million viewers. I think I'm going to get started right now and let my drooping handlebar mustache extend down my throat. Just call me "Paul".

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              • #8
                Ibewgypsie
                David you seem to have a bad habit of underestimating your own talents.I have only seen a few of your things plus your shop half the equipment there is made by you,and it's pretty impressive.I think you ought to take stock of what you have achieved a little more.
                Seems to me and quite a few others your a pretty talented guy (all round) no pun intended so keep up the good work hammer or no hammer regards Alistair
                Please excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

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                • #9
                  I don't know, if it was similar to a American "Chopper" where the "building" is really assembling. lol
                  Does anyone actually read siglines?

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                  • #10
                    Ya,put together a video and send it off to a tv bigwig,seening as how their out of new ideas they might just jump on it.Or if all else fails we could all get together and do a topless video I can see it now"Machinists gone wild"
                    I just need one more tool,just one!

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                    • #11

                      American chopper has conflict, they cry like babies, argue. I hate conflict and can not understand why it is still on the air. THe audience must be starved for something new.

                      Hungry for real shows, not work for a millionaire or on a desert island with all these tools, or eating raw worms. Television SUCKS, I rarely watch it.

                      David

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                      • #12
                        <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by ibewgypsie:

                        Reckon people would want to see a greybearded large man go rap rap rap with a hammer? I think not.
                        </font>
                        Dunno,

                        Depends on what your apprentice might look like and how functional the projects are.

                        -SD:

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                        • #13
                          ibewgypsie, by your post I take it you have not kept up on your history lessons. Blacksmithing has been around for 5000 to 6000 years. Blacksmithing is the KING or trades as most of the other trades depend on the blacksmith to make their tools. The blacksmith was the center of any town as the smith was the one who could make or repair anything. The word Blacksmith comes from the word Black for Iron, known as the blackmetal and smith, an artisan or craftsman. To make their lives easier and more productive blacksmiths started inventing machines to help them in their so called (your words - brainless) endevoures to keep the wheels of industry, commerce and daily life working in an orderly and easier fashion. Obviously you have never seen the amazing and intriquite work of Samuel Yellin, Americas most famous Blacksmith, in our nations capital and Philadelphia. All machine tools can trace their roots back to some (brainless) old blacksmith. If you want to get down to the nitty gritty, a modern machinist just uses a sophisticated machine to shape metal to his desires. If you want to really use your brain cells, try shaping the same thing with a forge, anvil, hammer and hand files. Have you the brain cells to cut a keyseat by hand without the aid of a sophisticated machine to do it for you. You should be thankfull to those old smiths who developed the technology and the first machines to do metal work easily. In theory you are a blacksmith as you are a craftsman in Iron. I am a 3rd generation BLACKSMITH and PROUD of it. You Evidently have not been to a living history place or a Steam Show, as there is always a crowd around the blacksmith marvelling at his skill to manipulate iron into something useful and beautiful. I do blacksmithing, welding and machine work, but I list my occupation as BLACKSMITH.

                          I have tempered my emotions and language in this post, as you set my emotions and my few brain cells into high gear with your post.

                          irnsrgn
                          Necessity is the mother of Invention

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                          • #14
                            What's TV
                            I can't find mine ever since high speed!!
                            please visit my webpage:
                            http://motorworks88.webs.com/

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                            • #15
                              Irn..

                              Don't be so sensitive and offended, I meant no insult to a trade I know nothing about.

                              Shaping sheetmetal with a small hammer over a sandbag is a long way from black smithing.

                              Long way. I am amazed at what they used to accomplish. The english wheel was fashioned to produce armor. I ain't got a clue how, thousand years of development probably. There is a market for knightly armor.

                              Even the plains indians that fashioned arrowheads from the iron skillets they stole from the whites.. HOW? did they hammer them out? They didn't have saws, cutting torches, or files?

                              You are reading something I didn't say.
                              I did say shaping the sheetmetal with a hammer was kinda mindless. You do keep a mental image of the end result and work toward it.

                              David

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