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  • OT: Sharpening Scissors

    My wife is a quilter. She handed me a box of scissors and asked if I could sharpen them. Well, it's metalworking, sorta, so I agreed to undertake the job, particularly as the alternative is to (gasp!) pay to have someone else do it. So off to the computer and Google, and eventually wind up at Wolff "Twice-As-Sharp" system. I have an 8" slow speed grinder that I like for sharpening wood turning tools, and I thought that the combinatation of the grinder plus the arms and clamp from Wolff would be a good solution. Yeah, I know I could make them, but that is a project too far. Before laying down the credit card I thought I would solicit the experience of the forum. What say you guys? Oh yeah, the budget for this is in the range of $250 US so anything more expensive would have to be converted into a DIY project. I don't really need another one of those, but ......

    http://twiceassharp.com/

    Thanks
    Carl

  • #2
    I always sharpened them by hand on a knife sharpening stone. You only hone the one edge, keep at it until the edge "disappears". It needs to be a smooth edge. What I've done probably isn't as good as a factory edge, or maybe what that grinder can do, but so far they've done OK.

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    • #3
      These videos about how fine scissors are made might give you some inspiration, especially the hand finishing steps.

      http://youtu.be/LHucRh0NTPo

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kjb-NMkMNhg

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      • #4
        Just don't run while your doing it.
        Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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        • #5
          My wife also is an experienced sewer. In addition, she owned, (briefly,) a wool and yarn shop, specializing in embroidery yarns and supplies. As part of her services, she had me sharpen scissors.
          All I did was darken the bevel angle of each blade with a black or blue Sharpie, and then hone the ink away with a hand-held stone or diamond padle. Most scissors only took a few strokes, and the diamond was definitely quicker. A few minutes would serve for most pairs, but if I ran into pin-nicks, they took more time. Was I successful? Everyone who used the service was happy. I cant remember what my wife charged as it was thirty years ago.
          If all you are doing is sharpening scissors for your wife and maybe her friends, then I cannot see how you can justify a sharpening rig.
          BUT, if you want a sharpening rig, and the scissors are an EXCUSE, then THAT is an entirely different matter.
          Duffy, Gatineau, Quebec

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          • #6
            Here's one at Sam's Club... $80.22.





            http://www.samsclub.com/sams/chef-s-...ci_sku=101509S

            You can buy it and try it. If it works for you then keep it... if not, they'll take it back.

            It's also available at stores other than Sam's Club.

            If you want more info, it's a ScissorPro Model 500

            http://www.chefschoice.com/page2a.html

            .
            Last edited by Mike Burdick; 09-21-2012, 03:04 PM.

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            • #7
              Draw file with appropriate needle file.

              This method was used to save the life of six year old son, who used mother's sewing scissors instead of sheet metal shears!

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              • #8
                I have a much simpler method of sharpening scissors. I hold a 1/16" drill bit (even a broken one will work) by the flutes in my left hand and just try to cut the round shank with the scissors. Use heavy pressure. The drill bit should be angled at the same angle as the original sharpened edges of the scissors. The scissors just slide along the drill bit and that hones the edges. A half dozen such strokes is usually enough. I then dry cut with them an additional half dozen times to remove any burr.

                Quick and simple and it produces a very good edge. This method has the additional advantage of not removing any metal from the scissors so they last a lot longer. In some cases a very light dressing with a fine stone can improve the edge after this procedure. VERY LIGHT.

                This method will not work if there is moderate or severe damage to the cutting edges. In this case, the more drastic methods above should be used. Personally, I would use my slow speed, wet wheel for that.
                Last edited by Paul Alciatore; 09-21-2012, 03:29 PM.
                Paul A.
                SE Texas

                And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
                You will find that it has discrete steps.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
                  I have a much simpler method of sharpening scissors. I hold a 1/16" drill bit (even a broken one will work) by the flutes in my left hand and just try to cut the round shank with the scissors. Use heavy pressure. The drill bit should be angled at the same angle as the original sharpened edges of the scissors. The scissors just slide along the drill bit and that hones the edges. A half dozen such strokes is usually enough. I then dry cut with them an additional half dozen times to remove any burr.

                  Quick and simple and it produces a very good edge. This method has the additional advantage of not removing any metal from the scissors so they last a lot longer. In some cases a very light dressing with a fine stone can improve the edge after this procedure. VERY LIGHT.




                  This method will not work if there is moderate or severe damage to the cutting edges. In this case, the more drastic methods above should be used. Personally, I would use my slow speed, wet wheel for that.

                  My grandmother would do that and then take several cuts on a piece of very fine sand paper until she was satisfied her scissors were sharp.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Rustybolt View Post
                    My grandmother would do that and then take several cuts on a piece of very fine sand paper until she was satisfied her scissors were sharp.
                    My grandmother used to do the same thing with a coke bottle, using the section where the cap crimped on.

                    Ken

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                    • #11
                      Dress lightly on a belt sander with a fine (100+) grit belt and a squirt of light lube (WD-40 or whatever floats your boat) on the belt to keep it cool. Sharpen the edges only, not the flat sides that face each other. For a really sharp finish dress with a fine diamond, ceramic, or arkansas stone. Then finish by making a few cuts on paper to remove any remaining burrs.

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                      • #12
                        I remember that now, Singer used to have a little sewing scissors sharpening rod gadget, my Mother had one, it was just a tapered rod in a kind of cardboard matchbook cover, that takes me back!
                        mark

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Duffy View Post
                          My wife also is an experienced sewer...
                          Sewer like where the drain pipes lead to?
                          Just ask'in.

                          --Doozer
                          DZER

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                          • #14
                            I use the shank of a carbide Dremel cutter. Two strokes with the tool flat against the inside of the blade, and one or two with the tool just slightly less than the bevel angle, then repeat on the other blade. That makes them cut nicely and doesn't leave a gap at the end of the blades.
                            Jim

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                            • #15
                              I have a Twice As Sharp that I inherited from my Dad. For quick, easy and precise sharpening of scissors in a high-volume business, they are about the best way to go. For low-volume, occasional sharpening, hand-honing as mentioned in other responses works just fine. If you are going to make your own version of the Twice As Sharp, as mentioned in your original post, be sure to use a deburring wheel after the grinding wheel (Enco sells deburring wheels). To use the TAS, you set the bevel angle, clamp one blade of the scissors in the guide arm and lightly run them across the grinding wheel, just until you can feel a uniform wire burr, then flip over, the clamping arm with the scissors still attached, and run them across the deburring wheel until the burr is gone. Do the other blade the same, then finish by closing the scissors a couple of times while lightly pressing the faces of the blades toward each other.

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