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OT: Do Cyclotrons Only Consume Power

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  • Evan
    replied
    Read up on the history of Berkeley. You may change your mind.

    If that were true our town would become a tribe if a Native American were elected Mayor.
    Bad analogy. It isn't applicable to civic politics.

    Leave a comment:


  • danlb
    replied
    Originally posted by Evan View Post
    Other than city council financially supporting the local communist party and other similar activities, you are only partially correct. I was born in Berkeley and grew up there. Berkeley has a long history of socialism.

    Wilson was a member of the Finnish Comrades' Association.

    http://www.sjsu.edu/faculty/watkins/finntown.htm
    I'm fairly certain that electing a member of a socialist party as Mayor in a democratic election does not change the political structure to being communist. If that were true our town would become a tribe if a Native American were elected Mayor. Berkeley politics do have a distinctly socialist lean, but that is within a normal city structure.

    It seems there are a lot of reactors around. I can point out 2 "research reactors" within 15 miles of my house. Google maps give a good overview of one installation, but no street view. https://maps.google.com/?ll=37.60865...25663&t=h&z=16


    Daniel

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  • Evan
    replied
    Has never been true.
    Other than city council financially supporting the local communist party and other similar activities, you are only partially correct. I was born in Berkeley and grew up there. Berkeley has a long history of socialism.

    In the 1911 Berkeley elected a Socialist Party mayor, J. Stitt Wilson. A Socialist Party member was elected to the Berkeley City Council. About eight hundred people filled the Finnish Hall for a pre-election rally and later a victory celebration.
    Wilson was a member of the Finnish Comrades' Association.

    http://www.sjsu.edu/faculty/watkins/finntown.htm

    Leave a comment:


  • alanganes
    replied
    Originally posted by Evan View Post
    It's the collected columns of C L Stong who wrote the Amateur Scientist column in Scientific American. I am pretty sure you won't be buying it although it is available.

    http://www.amazon.com/Scientific-Ame.../dp/0970347626
    That seems to be one of those moronic Amazon prices for stuff that is no longer in print but, still around if you look enough. I have a hard copy of the CL Stong book that I got on one of the on-line book sellers for 30 or so bucks maybe three years ago.

    There was also the CD of the entire SA "Amateur Scientist" column in the above link that was available. I have an original of one of those as well that I bought when the Society for Amateur Scientists" first published it. There are downloadable copies of that floating around the web, and torrents of it as well, if one looks around enough.

    I wanted a particle accelerator too. Not sure why, but why not? I get to run one at work now form time to time, and I climb all over one almost daily.

    Leave a comment:


  • Void
    replied
    Originally posted by Evan View Post
    What makes me laugh when I think about it is that right in the middle of Berkeley, California, one of the only towns in North America to have a communist government
    ...

    Has never been true.

    and the centre of everything that is anti-everything,...
    Partially true

    there is, at the University a nuclear reactor in the basement of one of the halls. It's a small research reactor that can even run under remote control but is still a reactor. I wonder how many of the professional protesters know about it?
    Has not been true for 25 years. It was shut down in 1987 and everyone knew about it (which is one of the main reasons it was shut down.)

    -DU-

    Leave a comment:


  • Evan
    replied
    It's the collected columns of C L Stong who wrote the Amateur Scientist column in Scientific American. I am pretty sure you won't be buying it although it is available.

    http://www.amazon.com/Scientific-Ame.../dp/0970347626

    Leave a comment:


  • Forestgnome
    replied
    When I was a kid there was a science fair projects book in the library that showed how to make a linear accellerator. It looked like the one Evan posted. I can't seem to find the book online though.

    Leave a comment:


  • Evan
    replied
    The new discoveries in Northeast BC ensure that gas will remain cheap in Canada for a long time. There is enough natural gas there to fill three 46" pipelines to the coast and still satisfy Canadian demand.

    Leave a comment:


  • J Tiers
    replied
    Originally posted by Evan View Post
    Natural gas is dirt cheap and will stay that way for quite a while now.
    Maybe not...... one big way it is cheap is "fracking", and that is getting somewhat close to being regulated out of existence in some places at least.....

    It's still "hot", because the hydrogen component obviously contributes only one of the more potent greenhouse gases around*, but NOT CO2..... so since NG has less CO2, even WITH the bad GG content, it's considered better, and is displacing coal..

    *Water vapor... sorta hard to get away from, but still a potent GG.

    Leave a comment:


  • Evan
    replied
    I used to help out my father there on his experiments on fusion. He was in the first program to figure out confinement which of course failed miserably. He was running an axial solenoid confinement machine and it all leaked out the ends. Then they tried end mirrors and it leaked out around the edges of the mirrors. Then they extended the mirrors along the axis and the plasma went snaky and contacted the chamber walls and on and on... The Bevatron had just gone into operation then and I watched one run where the beam was directed into free air on the opposite side from the control room. It made a flashbulb like bar of solid blue/purple ionized nitrogen about 20 feet long. The 88" machine was one of the first ones there if I recall correctly.

    Leave a comment:


  • gearedloco
    replied
    Originally posted by Evan View Post
    What makes me laugh when I think about it is that right in the middle of Berkeley, California, one of the only towns in North America to have a communist government and the centre of everything that is anti-everything, there is, at the University a nuclear reactor in the basement of one of the halls. It's a small research reactor that can even run under remote control but is still a reactor. I wonder how many of the professional protesters know about it?
    Nope - it's long gone . Not enough Nuclear Engineering students to justify it's existence, given the usual background level noise from the
    Bird and Bunny people. The attached office/class room building is now used by the Computer Science people. I don't know what was done
    with the space occupied by the reactor. Probably some college or other is growing organic mushrooms in it. Or maybe it was just filled in.

    As far as I know, the only cyclotron still operating at UC/LBNL is the 88" machine on the Hill, and maybe it's gone since I retired. The 184"
    machine building is now occupied by the Advanced Light Source. The Bevatron is gone - all of the measurably "hot" bits were hauled to Washington and buried somewhere on the Hanford reservation. I forget what the building planned for the site is to be used for.

    Leave a comment:


  • bob_s
    replied
    Originally posted by Evan View Post
    Natural gas is dirt cheap and will stay that way for quite a while now. I suspect they may be enlarging the Gas generating plant down by the river.

    Yep, I was right. In 2008 and 2009 they commissioned 243 megawatts of gas powered capacity at the Clover Bar Energy Centre.

    http://www.capitalpower.com/generati...rgyCentre.aspx
    The main U of A campus has its own power plant. I don't doubt that the new facility would have its own also.

    Leave a comment:


  • Evan
    replied
    Natural gas is dirt cheap and will stay that way for quite a while now. I suspect they may be enlarging the Gas generating plant down by the river.

    Yep, I was right. In 2008 and 2009 they commissioned 243 megawatts of gas powered capacity at the Clover Bar Energy Centre.

    http://www.capitalpower.com/generati...rgyCentre.aspx
    Last edited by Evan; 09-28-2012, 06:09 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • wierdscience
    replied
    Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
    A cyclotron can be pretty small..... the size of an MRI machine, perhaps, and can consume about the same power or less. Not some sort of atomic bomb that will suck you all into a black hole. They are straightforward machines, and do what they do nicely.

    Y'all need to worry about something important instead.
    Yep,one of the guys at work used to moonlight as a curier for the finished products.The company had three or four units in different locations.They were no bigger than an MRI.

    Leave a comment:


  • EddyCurr
    replied
    I think your neighbor's might be bigger than my neighbor's.

    It seems as though Advanced Cyclotron Systems Inc. may be the vendor on this
    build. If so, their product range operates in the 14 to 30 MeV spectrum.

    Originally posted by J Tiers
    Y'all need to worry about something important instead.
    It's the bigger picture I'm interested in. T'aint the cyclotron that riles me.

    Mind you, wondered early on about the process associated with locating it up the road
    in the heart of a residential district. If you can imagine, in May 2011 two plans for the
    site were presented to an adjacent community: A) vehicle maintenance pool; B) medical
    research and prod'n facility. Oil changes or isotopes - decisions, decisions.

    In October 2011, Plan B was announced and the tender process was begun.

    Now less than a year later, the site work is nearing completion ? Howzat possible?
    There are modest home renovations underway around here that are running past 14 mo.

    With 600 acres to build up and 20k people to accomodate, there is a lot that can happen.
    However it shakes out, there will be a vast change to the landscape.

    .

    Leave a comment:

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