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  • #16
    From this forum:

    use to take around two hours to chage up from a boiler. We then ran it on passenge trains starting around 1200 until 1600 then do a shunt. When starting you would fill the boiler up around 2/3s of a glass, then fill up with steam at first the steam would turn to water. But then as pressure rose you would then drain water off via blow vavle, so that water stayed around 2/3s. we would try to get 160ish presure but more offen 140 (the filling boiler being not that good). When first used you could watch the boiler presure fall. but this would go less and less as the boiling presure of the water lowered, the steam that you had boiled the water that you had. At the end of a day you could not see the water in the glass (no lead pug so no worryes).
    Richard

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    • #17

      I've been through Gillette only once, in 1999 when en route to Buffalo and a tent site above Ten Sleep. That is very pretty country. There was a huge RVer convention in Gillette with hundreds of motor-homes the size of Greyhound buses. I don't know why some people think they need to take the kitchen sink along when they go camping.
      That was probably the annual gathering of the Escapees, an RV club devoted to full-timers. Those people aren't "camping", but "living" in their motorhomes.

      We saw a compressed air locomotive in Wallace, Idaho. As interesting as it was, our visit to the Bordello Museum was even more memorable.

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      • #18
        So neither the temperature nor the pressure in the locomotive 'boiler' is very high? It makes my head hurt to think about it too much.

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        • #19
          Well, my great grandfather rode with Jesse James...so who am I supposed to be enemies with?

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          • #20
            It answered some questions I had, about the inefficiency of an isothermal compression stage, followed by an adiabatic expansion which can ice the pipes.
            Compressed air is a miserably inefficient way to store energy, especially when the heat of compression is lost. It can be made a lot more efficient than that machine. By using a "reverse radiator" to absorb heat from the surrounding air the efficiency can be nearly doubled. Even then it isn't a contender with any other system except for fire safety. I wonder if they used copper or bronze tires on the wheels to prevent sparking? Methane is very easy to ignite.

            Beautiful pictures but I dare not visit anyplace at such altitude and that includes flying at all. I won't get enough oxygen.
            Last edited by Evan; 10-07-2012, 05:30 PM.
            Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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            • #21
              Originally posted by MaxxLagg View Post
              typically Missouri way.
              You mean that your great, great grandmother couldn't run faster then her brother.
              The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

              Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

              Southwestern Ontario. Canada

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              • #22
                Originally posted by RWL View Post
                Yes. They had one at the local power plant. Not that particular make, but something very similar. Just pull up to the steam outlet, tank up and go. It was used for switching coal cars in the yard.
                It think they'd have to....that was the impression I was left with in reading about them.

                Allan, you've title it a compressed air engine; do you know this or could it be a steam engine with a heat source? Hard to imagine compressed air getting it down the siding and back
                .

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                • #23
                  I thought they were supposed to be more efficient than similar fired locos?

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Mcgyver View Post
                    Allan, you've title it a compressed air engine; do you know this or could it be a steam engine with a heat source?
                    Open the link in reply #8, by 11 Bravo. You will see that it is a Porter compressed air locomotive. No smokestack. Maybe a whistle.
                    Allan Ostling

                    Phoenix, Arizona

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Evan View Post
                      I wonder if they used copper or bronze tires on the wheels to prevent sparking? Methane is very easy to ignite.

                      Beautiful pictures but I dare not visit anyplace at such altitude and that includes flying at all. I won't get enough oxygen.
                      The ores of Creede were mostly silver, with some gold and zinc. Methane, I suppose, would be more of a problem in a coal mine. It looks like the tires on this locomotive are painted, so it is not easy to tell if it has copper tires.

                      I'm sorry to hear that you cannot visit anyplace at altitudes which are common in Colorado -- 8,000 to 11,000 feet (with a few higher passes). From what I gather it is not possible for you to "acclimatize" your body to the reduced oxygen and pressure by making a gradual ascent, several days perhaps. I wish there was a way.
                      Allan Ostling

                      Phoenix, Arizona

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                      • #26
                        Alot of posters seem to think the smokeless and compressed air locos were used to prevent explosion, but surely that is only one reason and applies to coal mines, not to gold or other safe mines or most factories. The point is that a normal coal-fired loco could not be used underground, or in factories for that matter because of the smoke. My guess is that compressed air locos were ideal underground because of the huge compressed air supplies generally available above and below ground and fireless type were ideal around power stations, factories etc because of the large, economically-produced steam supplies to hand.

                        ps. yes I know coal-fired cranes and locos were used inside works, but I bet they were never popular.
                        Last edited by Peter S; 10-08-2012, 04:33 AM.

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                        • #27
                          A book I have refers to compressed air locos being used in cotton handling facilities, where a lot of combustible dust is around. Might also apply to flour milling, some textile factories, coal handling and crushing areas, some chemical factories, paint making factories, etc, etc.

                          Most factories? not really...... although even a propane forklift is a bit obnoxious to have around, so there would be advantages. Electric via battery is not at all so safe.... they can have the sparking areas shielded and screened, but a major failure would be a problem. All a CA loco can do is go boom... and that is pretty local. Not good if you are near it, but unlikely to blow up the whole place.
                          1601

                          Keep eye on ball.
                          Hashim Khan

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                          • #28
                            What about some type of dieseling effect with a compressed air locomotive?

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by ckelloug View Post
                              What about some type of dieseling effect with a compressed air locomotive?
                              Dieseling, is that not caused by ignition of a fuel-air mixture by glowing carbon deposits? How could you get that in a compressed air engine?
                              Allan Ostling

                              Phoenix, Arizona

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by aostling View Post
                                Dieseling, is that not caused by ignition of a fuel-air mixture by glowing carbon deposits? How could you get that in a compressed air engine?
                                I suspect not at all.... because the heat of compression is what causes ignition in a classic diesel. Glowing bits can do it for a gas engine, with compression no doubt helping.

                                But the air in the loco was compressed a while back, and has cooled, not to mention further cooling as it is throttled to the cylinders, and expanded in them. It would be more likely in the air compressor itself, charging the tank to 1200lb (81 atmospheres, diesels compress to perhaps 17 or so, depending). If oil got atomrized in some way, it might be ignited by the heat of compression.
                                1601

                                Keep eye on ball.
                                Hashim Khan

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